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RHO: 1C --> LHO: 1S --> RHO: 2D

Does this mean 4-4 in clubs/diamonds, or 5-4 in clubs diamonds. Is it a reverse? (e.g.18+ pts?).

Assuming opponents play SAYC.

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1 Answer 1

  • Definitely a reverse, say 15-16+ HCP + distributional values.
  • Promises 5+ clubs.
  • Can be a "waiting reverse" with only 3 diamonds to elicit more information from partner, with either 3 hearts or 6+ clubs.

The point to a "waiting reverse" is when opener has multiple options for a non-ideal bid, and wishes to set the denomination after responder rebids. It should be done only in a suit below 2 of responder's suit, unless opener is stronger than a minimum reverse. As noted it is often done with 3 of responder's suit to see if responder can rebid it. It often implies slam interest, as the extra information communicated may be of more use to the defence in merely a game contract.

With a minimum reverse, opener must be able to retreat to either 3 of responder's suit or 3NT if the reverse suit is raised.

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Thank you for thorough explanation. so answering higher ranked suit on higher level definitely means reverse, right? How would you go if you had minimum opening points (12pts), 4C-4D-4H-1S, opened 1C, partner responded 1S (forcing). You can't show 2D due to minimum opening points & you can't bid 1nt. –  user5185 May 20 '13 at 18:59
    
Open 1D instead of 1C. If you can't handle all possible responses by partner, then you don't have an opening 1-bid. –  Pieter Geerkens May 20 '13 at 20:40
    
Rephrasing slightly: Open 1D instead of 1C. If you can't rebid over all possible forcing responses by partner, then you don't have an opening 1-bid –  Pieter Geerkens May 26 '13 at 18:28

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