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At what point do you need to decide which additional actions to choose? To make this question explicit, suppose I play the Village (+1 card; +2 actions). Do I need to decide which two actions I will play immediately, or do I decide on the second action after choosing and completing the first action? For example, if I play the Smithy (+3 cards) as my first additional action, can my second action be an action I just picked up?

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marked as duplicate by Colin D, Paul Marshall, Powerlord, user1873, Johno Sep 23 '13 at 9:01

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Simply? Yes.

Imagine you have a little "action bank". At the start of your turn, it contains "1 Action" which you can spend to play an Action card. If you play a terminal card (like Smithy) then you're down to "0 Actions" and you're done. If you play a non-terminal like Market, after it uses up the action in the bank, it gives +1 Action - so it repays itself, and you can play another Action card. If you play a village/splitter that says "+2 Actions", you get to put both those actions in the bank. So you can then use one to play a Smithy, draw three cards, then use the second action to play any Action card in your hand, including one drawn with the Smithy.

"+1 Buy" and "+1 Coin" work in the same way, except that you can't use either of them until your Buy phase (i.e. once you're done playing all your Action cards), with a slight exception with Black Market. "+1/2/3 Cards" is the only one that's different, in that its effect resolves instantly without choice - when you play a card that tells you to draw cards, you draw them immediately.

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This is probably one of the most common questions for first-time players, along with confusion about whether "+1 Coin" means you take a Copper from the Supply (you don't) or whether you can buy Curses to put in other players' decks (you normally can't). On a related note, it only takes one "action" to play a Throne Room, which then lets you select an Action card from your hand and play it twice, which effectively turns any "+1 Action" card into a village. –  ConMan Sep 16 '13 at 23:39
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To elaborate on ConMan's answer, here is the direct text of the rules:

"+X Action(s)" – the player may play X number of additional Actions this turn. +X Action(s) adds to the number of Actions that can be played in the Action phase. It does not mean play another Action immediately. The instructions on the current Action card must be completed before playing any additional Actions."

As the bolded part indicates, +Actions are treated like a resource pool. You complete the card giving you +Actions, then you may play an additional action, completely resolving that card. You may continue playing actions until you run out of available actions in your "action resource pool" (which is not an official Dominion term, but is useful for explaining the mechanic).

So, in your case, you would resolve Village, which draws you one card and adds two actions to your "action pool." Then, since you have actions remaining, you can choose to play another action card from your hand, completely resolving it. This would be the Smithy in your example, so you would draw 3 cards. Then, you still have an action remaining in your "action pool," so you may choose another card from your hand. At this point, your hand includes the 3 cards that you drew with Smithy, so any of those cards are fair game.

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Amazing how many questions can be answered if people would just read the rules of their games... –  Charles Boyung Sep 17 '13 at 18:37
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