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Courser of Kruphix says:

Play with the top card of your library revealed. You may play the top card of your library if it's a land card. Whenever a land enters the battlefield under your control, you gain 1 life.

Does this mean if the top cards in my deck are a series of land cards they will all be played as they are revealed or is it still limited by the one land per turn rule?

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This is a common point of confusion because people remember Oracle of Mul Daya, which is a very similar card that did have that extra clause. Courser doesn't. Watch out for this mistake, especially at tournaments. –  Alex P Mar 8 at 1:18
    
See also: Future Sight/Magus of the Future, which have the same limitation. –  Chad Miller Mar 8 at 3:19
    
It simply means you may play it as if it was in your hand. –  ikegami Mar 8 at 5:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You play the land normally, as if it were in your hand, with all the same restrictions. You are still limited by the 1 land per turn rule. In order for a card to let you play more than 1 land, it would need to say "you may play additional lands", or it could say "you may put it onto the battlefield" instead of saying "play."

See the rulings on Gatherer:

1/1/2014 Playing a land with the second ability counts as your land play for the turn. If you play a land from your hand during your turn, you won’t be able to play an additional land from the top of your library unless another effect allows you to.

And of course, the timing restrictions still apply too: you still have to play the land at a normal time, during your main phase when you have priority with an empty stack.

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