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Let's say a player casts a spell, completely allows it to resolve, and accepts its consequences - then realises that was a bad idea, or there was something better to do. That player realises there was a better card to play, or that the spell will do something they don't want to happen, such as deal enough damage to that player to kill them.

Does the caster have the opportunity to go back and fix that mistake (and to stay alive), even though they already accepted the consequences?

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Do you mean using a card illegally (i.e. it shouldn't have been possible to cast that card in the first place) or someone completely legally casting a card, then realising there was probably something better to do? –  Jonathan Hobbs Mar 23 at 4:16
    
I mean that if someone misread the card like to protect them self from damage and then accepting the damage dealt to them but then realizing that the Card was used wrong after he accepted the amount of damage that would have killed him wouldn't the game have technically already ended? Or would he be aloud to correct his mistake –  Marath the commander Mar 23 at 16:01
    
Once a game has ended, it's ended. While you're welcome to do whatever you like in casual play, no tournament would return to a finished game or retroactively change the result due to a mistake. –  Studoku Mar 23 at 23:14
    
Sorry, even with your comment clarification, I don't understand what you mean. By "used wrong", do you mean he did something with the card that the card doesn't do (like he dealt himself 3 damage even though the card only says to deal him 2 damage), or that he just realized that the 3 damage the card does will kill himself and he wants to not play it because of that. –  GendoIkari Mar 24 at 13:31
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Can you please post the exact cards involved here, rather than paraphrasing their effects? –  Studoku Mar 24 at 22:38
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2 Answers 2

Depends on what you mean by "misused".

If the card was cast illegally, such as trying to Shock a creature with Hexproof, the game is rewound to the point immediately before the spell was cast. This does depend on how much time has passed- if so much time has passed that fixing it would be difficult, just correct anything currently illegal and continue the game.

If a player just did something silly, like trying to Shock a creature that actually had 3 toughness because of a Glorious Anthem, the answer is no in any tournament setting. Once you've taken an action, you can't suddenly change your mind. In casual play, it's up to the opponent. If the opponent decides it's sporting to allow take-backs, they can allow them.

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The asker has left comments clarifying what they mean by misused. –  Jonathan Hobbs Mar 24 at 4:59
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@JonathanHobbs and those comments are no more clear than the original question –  Charles Boyung Mar 24 at 20:09
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It would entirely depend on the type of game you're playing.

If you're playing in any sort of tournament or other "serious" venue, you're SOL.

In a casual setting, it would depend on your opponent, I suppose. If they agree to rewind, then you're good.

But to put a proper answer in, strict RAW says that once you've done it, you've done it.

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And if you're running into things like this (misreading a card you're playing with) sounds pretty likely it's a pretty casual setting. –  Jefromi Mar 24 at 17:55
    
@Jefromi I've seen instances of people playing cards in tournaments not realizing that it won't do what they expect (due to card interactions or just a mental misfire). So it's possible for this to happen in a game where the results matter. –  Allen Gould Mar 24 at 18:17
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