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I understand that Blackjack in Atlantic City casinos is regulated by the state and that they determine the rules of Blackjack that all the casinos must adhere to.

Specifically, I would like to know:

  • Is the dealer required to stand on a soft 17?
  • How many decks are used?
  • Is the shoe normally played to the last card or is it shuffled before being empty?
  • How many times can you split?
  • Can you double down after splitting?
  • Can you double down after splitting Aces?
  • Can a split Ace be dealt more than one card?
  • Does a split Ace and ten value card count as Blackjack or 21?
  • If the dealer has Blackjack and you have 21 (but not Blackjack) do you lose the hand?
  • What is the payout for Blackjack?
  • Is insurance offered? How much does it cost?
  • Is late or early surrender offered?
  • What is the minimum bet per hand at the major Atlantic City casinos?
  • By how much can you increase or decrease your bet between hands?
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1 Answer 1

Random article from Google

  • Stand on soft 17
  • Eight decks
  • No mention of shoe emptying rules
  • Splitting up to 3 times (total of 4 hands)
  • Double down after splitting is allowed
  • Not explicitly mentioned but unlikely due to one card after split Ace
  • One card each after splitting an ace (and no resplit)
  • Ace and ten after split is 21
  • The dealer does check for Blackjack, so 21 never occurs vs Blackjack
  • Blackjack pays 3 to 2
  • Insurance is allowed and pays 2 to 1, typically insurance is up to half your original bet in this case (not explicitly mentioned)
  • Late surrender is allowed
  • No mention of minimum bet
  • No mention of betting rules
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