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Whip of Erebos says

Return target creature card from your graveyard to the battlefield. It gains haste. Exile it at the beginning of the next end step. If it would leave the battlefield, exile it instead of putting it anywhere else. Activate this ability only any time you could cast a sorcery.

Does that mean that the creature will remain on the battlefield for the rest of the current turn and pretty much all of the next turn, too, save for the end of that turn? eg. could I attack with the resurrected creature twice?

And what happens if I bounce it back to my hand? I assume it doesn't go to the graveyard from my hand?

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By the way, you left out part of the text of the ability that was clearly relevant to the question. That's probably not a good idea if you want to get the correct answer. –  murgatroid99 Apr 8 at 5:00

2 Answers 2

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The creature will remain on the battlefield for the remainder of the turn that it came into play. The last phase of each turn is the ending phase, and the first step of that phase is the end step. When that step starts, the triggered ability "Exile it at the beginning of the next end step" will trigger and you will exile the creature.

The next part of the ability says "If it would leave the battlefield, exile it instead of putting it anywhere else." This means that if it would go to your hand from the battlefield (you "bounce" it), it is exiled instead.

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Re "The creature will remain on the battlefield for the remainder of the turn that it came into play.", ...unless Sundial of the Infinite is used. –  ikegami Apr 8 at 17:44
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Sundial of the Infinite is a special case, so it's not really worth mentioning every time there's a discussion of an ability that triggers at a specific step or phase. –  murgatroid99 Apr 8 at 18:00
    
It's funny you should mention abilities that trigger at a specific step, because it's pretending it didn't have anything to do with steps ("for the remainder of the turn that it came into play") that opened the door to mentioning the Sundial. –  ikegami Apr 8 at 18:28
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Actually, you can't do that. The ability specifically says "Activate this ability only any time you could cast a sorcery." So besides Sundial, the creature will always leave play the turn it entered. "Remainder" is an approximation that very rarely matters in practice. –  murgatroid99 Apr 8 at 18:46
    
I was referring to the ability being used in the end step and the whip's activated ability. Without that, sundial is the only special case. –  murgatroid99 Apr 8 at 19:56

The whipped creature will be exiled at the beginning of the next end step, so it will normally only be able to attack once.

There is a way to keep it permanently in play if you Exile the creature, then return it to the battlefield with something like Cloudshift. This way, the replacement effect on leaving the battlefield will not occur (Whip doesn't send the creature to exile, because it's going to exile anyway). Then after Cloudshift returns it to play it is a new creature and Whip of Erebos won't be able to find it to Exile it at the end of the turn.

You could also phase it out before the end of the turn, since Phasing Out doesn't leave the battlefield.. The creature would then be unable to be exiled at the end of the turn as its phased out. The replacement effect from the Whip would still be in effect, so if the creature later leaves the battlefield it would be exiled instead.

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If the Whipped creature phases out, it will not be exiled at the end step (it "doesn't exist"). However, it is still the same object, so after it phases back in, if it leaves the battlefield, the replacement effect will still kick in and exile it. –  Brian S Apr 8 at 16:05

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