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Let's say my opponent has out Akroma's Memorial, Asceticism, Darksteel Forge, or something similar that uses the word "have" to give abilities. If I use a Clone effect to copy a creature my opponent controls that has any of these extra abilities, will my clone also have Indestructble, Hexproof, or similar?

If not, why does the Clone of a token produced with Twinflame have haste?

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Welcome to B&CG! –  Pat Ludwig Jul 20 at 17:44

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No, they will not. You only get to copy what is actually printed on the card; not any information that has changed the properties of that object.

See this ruling on Clone:

Clone copies exactly what was printed on the original creature and nothing more (unless that creature is copying something else or is a token; see below). It doesn't copy whether that creature is tapped or untapped, whether it has any counters on it or Auras attached to it, or any non-copy effects that have changed its power, toughness, types, color, or so on.

The actual rule that explains this:

706.2. When copying an object, the copy acquires the copiable values of the original object’s characteristics and, for an object on the stack, choices made when casting or activating it (mode, targets, the value of X, whether it was kicked, how it will affect multiple targets, and so on). The "copiable values" are the values derived from the text printed on the object (that text being name, mana cost, color indicator, card type, subtype, supertype, rules text, power, toughness, and/or loyalty), as modified by other copy effects, by “as . . . enters the battlefield” and "as . . . is turned face up" abilities that set characteristics, and by abilities that caused the object to be face down. Other effects (including type-changing and text-changing effects), status, and counters are not copied.

Copying tokens works a little differently, just because there is no literal "card text" to copy. Instead, a token's copiable values are determined by the effect that created the token.

110.5b The spell or ability that creates a token may define the values of any number of characteristics for the token. This becomes the token's "text." The characteristic values defined this way are functionally equivalent to the characteristic values that are printed on a card; for example, they define the token's copiable values. A token doesn't have any characteristics not defined by the spell or ability that created it.

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But what about Twinflame? When you clone a token created by Twinflame, the clone has haste. Why does that work? –  Mister Dood Jul 20 at 1:59
    
@MisterDood As tokens have no "text printed on them", there must be separate rules for what you copy when you copy a token; looking for those rules now. –  GendoIkari Jul 20 at 2:02
    
@MisterDood I found this ruling on Cackling Counterpart: "If the copied creature is a token, the token that's created copies the original characteristics of that token as stated by the effect that put the token onto the battlefield." Still looking for the actual rule that addresses this. –  GendoIkari Jul 20 at 2:05
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@MisterDood Found it: 110.5b The spell or ability that creates a token may define the values of any number of characteristics for the token. This becomes the token's "text." The characteristic values defined this way are functionally equivalent to the characteristic values that are printed on a card; for example, they define the token's copiable values. A token doesn't have any characteristics not defined by the spell or ability that created it. –  GendoIkari Jul 20 at 2:06
    
Thanks for the clarification. I didn't realize it was in a separate rule. –  Mister Dood Jul 20 at 2:13

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