Take the 2-minute tour ×
Board & Card Games Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who like playing board games, designing board games or modifying the rules of existing board games. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to have an idea of my level in go (in kyu). This would for instance help me choose the most appropriate go books to read. I would like to do this through playing against a program—because I can play anywhere anytime.

I read on Wikipedia that each difference of one point in kyu is equivalent to one stone of handicap, and also that one stone is valued to 13–16 points in score difference. So, if I knew the level of the program I play against, this would allow me to quickly adjust the handicap (depending on the score difference) so that games are balanced, and then counting one kyu of difference for each stone of handicap.

But what is the level of computer/tablet programs? Is there a reference somewhere, or some resources that would give some information on that? In my case, I would love to have some idea of the current level of Little Go on iOS (which is based on Fuego), for 19x19 go.

share|improve this question
1  
Though it would be a bit tedious, one way to test this would be to play a few games between Fuego and another bot with known level. You can easily find such bots on KGS. –  Gregor Jul 30 at 15:56
1  
As it is now, it seems this question is too specific and will quickly get outdated. Would you mind rewriting it, for instance along the lines of "How can I quickly estimate my level in Go?", that would allow for more broadly helpful answers, and your particular examples may still be mentioned, possibly with a date or version. –  mafu Jul 31 at 2:14
    
@Gregor, thanks, that's an idea. I guess someone has an idea about the level of Fuego on a tablet, though? –  EOL Jul 31 at 4:30
    
@mafutrct, this makes sense. I did edit my question. Before posting it, I looked for the posting guidelines but failed to do find them in a reasonable amount of time… :) PS: Ah… found the answers under "Help": boardgames.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic, boardgames.stackexchange.com/help/dont-ask. –  EOL Jul 31 at 4:31

2 Answers 2

Usually when one has no hint about is level in go it's because he is just a beginner that is between 25 kyu and 15 kyu.

The level of Fuego on iOS is probably something between 3 kyu and 1 dan. So if you win at 9 handicap on 19x19 it's already very good on. If you success, try to decrease the handicap one stone each time.

For book reading really good books are graded go problems for beginners volume 1 and volume 2

share|improve this answer

There are several rating systems, for most players their KGS rating and EGF rating will be different, and it can be different from national rating systems (e.g. it is often assumed that French and British ratings for the same player are 2 stones different). So, in a sense, your question cannot be answered unless you specify the rating system you want to be measured against.

The benchmark could be a KGS rating, because KGS is so widely used. The best way to know your rating is to play on KGS with the real players, and KGS will answer your question.

It might be more psychologically comfortable to play against robots, but, from a personal experience, I would not recommend it, they do not help you to improve at the rate that the games against humans will. Also, they have flaws that you might identify and this will allow you to win the games against these robots, but this won't translate in your improved ability to play against humans.

share|improve this answer
    
The question can be answered: it just has to specify a level along with its rating system (very much like units are important in a speed like 3 km/h). :) Also, playing a robot is more than psychologically more comfortable: it is also very convenient, as one can play anywhere, anytime, and even interrupt and restart a game if needed. That said, what you write about humans being more interesting opponents is very reasonable (and shared by many). –  EOL Oct 3 at 12:25
1  
Yes, this is good way to rephrase my answer. –  Yulia V Oct 3 at 12:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.