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The definition of storm (such as in Grapeshot) is:

Storm (When you play this spell, put a copy of it onto the stack for each other spell that was played before it this turn. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for any number of the copies.)

Does Storm count the spells played by the opponent?

This definition does not specify if the spell are played by the controller of the "Storm-card" or by the opponent. I read this article and it does not clarify my doubt.

I ask this because the owner of my local shop told me that Storm does not count enemy spells and he is a kind of judge.

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3  
As the answers show, this is one of many cases in which Magic cards (or rules, really) are meant to be read literally. – David Z Jan 29 at 7:59
2  
That is true. The effect "Exile target permanent" is VASTLY more powerful than "Exile target permanent you control". Unspecified target or reference are literally unspecified, so anything will trigger. Note that judges can get it wrong too. MtG has TONS of rules, and there are tons and tons of legacy stuff that... can happen, but are really obscure, like Enchantments that become a create and then get turned into a land and then clone happens and then all sorts of fun stuff... – Nelson Jan 29 at 9:07
2  
Many years ago Wing Shards was a very popular card in my play group. That card teached me it's best to cast your spells in your second main phase in most cases :) – Ivo Beckers Jan 29 at 11:14
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You get a copy for every previous spell, not just the ones you cast. The Storm rules (that you linked to) define Storm in rule 702.39a:

Storm is a triggered ability that functions on the stack. “Storm” means “When you cast this spell, put a copy of it onto the stack for each other spell that was cast before it this turn. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for any of the copies.”

As you can see, it uses the same wording as the reminder text you quote. It does not mention who cast the previous spells, so it counts all previous spells.

Cards that care about which player did something always say so. If any trigger event, or description, or bit of text that cares about information does not mention a player, then it does not distinguish between players.

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You pretty much figured this out yourself. It doesn't say the spells have to be yours, or that they have to be your opponents' (or that they can't be), so it counts all spells that have been cast.

By the way, the rule you quoted in your question appears to be from an older version of the comprehensive rules. The current version is:

702.39a Storm is a triggered ability that functions on the stack. “Storm” means “When you cast this spell, put a copy of it onto the stack for each other spell that was cast before it this turn. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for any of the copies.”

If a judge (or a "kind of" judge) told you that it didn't count opponents' spells, well, they were wrong.

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