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How does the regeneration work? I know that if my creature is destroyed then I can spend X mana then tap my creature and move it out of combat. Is it attackable in any way after that? With spells or instants?

Edit: What I really wanted to know is that if someone uses for example Shock on my creature can I say at that moment "Ok, I will spend 2 mana and regenerate my creature" or when that Shock is played it is resolved immediately any my creature is destroyed (assuming that it has 1 toughness and no regeneration shield on it)

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After reading your edit, I think this article on Priority and the Stack may be helpful for you. After the Shock is played you have priority to respond. –  ghoppe Aug 23 '11 at 20:59
    
Thanks, it was! –  Adam Arold Aug 26 '11 at 13:24
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A creature is destroyed when a resolved spell or effect says so (destruction by effect), or when the total damage it received this turn from anywhere is equal to or greater than its current toughness (destruction by game rules).

At any time you can regenerate a creature with an appropriate spell or effect. The only condition is that the regeneration has to happen before the destruction effect. You can regenerate a creature as often as you like, anytime. For each time you regenerate it, the creature gets a "regeneration shield" that lasts until the turn ends or until it is used up by a destruction effect, whatever happens first. If a destruction event would happen and the creature has a "regeneration shield" active, the following things happen:

  • One of those shields is removed
  • All damage received by the creature this turn is removed
  • If a destruction effect caused the event to trigger, it resolves but has no effect
  • The creature gets tapped (Note that this is an effect of regeneration. The creature does not have to be untapped to regenerate it)
  • The creature gets removed from combat, if it was regenerated during combat

Note that certain spells or effects state something like "Destroy target creature. It can't be regenerated.". In that case, you can still respond with a regeneration shield, but the regeneration effect is ignored and the creature still gets destroyed.

Is it attackable in any way after that? With spells or instants?

"Attack" has a defined meaning in M:TG: You attack with creatures only, during a combat phase. The only valid targets for an attack are opposing players and Planeswalkers. The correct term to use for spells and effects is "target", if it is a targeted spell or effect. And yes, regeneration provides no further protection from multiple damage sources or spells/effects. You can, as stated above, provide multiple regeneration shields, so as long as you can pay the costs, you can regenerate as often as you want.

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Thanks for the answer, I edited my question. –  Adam Arold Aug 23 '11 at 13:08
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@edem Regarding your edit: Both Shock and the regeneration ability, as all spells and effects, use the stack. Therefore a Shock never resolves immediately, and you can always respond to it, unless (as always) another effect or ability prevents you from doing so. For example, as long as a spell with the Split Second ability is on the stack, nobody can put other spells/effects on the stack. –  Hackworth Aug 23 '11 at 13:43
    
Thanks. Accepting your answer. –  Adam Arold Aug 24 '11 at 8:32
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What I really wanted to know is that if someone uses for example Shock on my creature can I say at that moment "Ok, I will spend 2 mana and regenerate my creature"

Short answer: Yes.

Longer answer: I linked this nice article as a comment to your question that has a very thorough discussion, with examples, of how the Stack and Priority works in MtG. I thought I'd give the summary here. Note in this synopsis I will ignore any rules, cards or keywords that may modify these rules. (ie. Split Second, Flash)

  1. When a player plays a spell or ability, that player keeps priority. The Spell/Ability is on the stack but doesn't resolve yet (ie. Shock).
  2. When a player with priority passes priority with a Spell/Ability on the stack, the next player may play an Instant or activate an ability (ie. regenerate). If they do, it goes on the top of the stack but doesn't resolve yet.
  3. The Spell/Ability on top of the stack resolves when both (or all, in multiplayer games) players pass priority in a row.
  4. When a spell resolves, the active player (the player whose turn it is), gets priority. If there are still spells or abilities on the stack, go to step 2.

And just to be crystal clear, once the Regeneration Shield resolves (replaces a destruction effect) that card can still be targeted again. If your opponent has another Shock and has mana, he can cast the spell on your creature. Of course, if you still have the mana, you can regenerate it again…

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Another useful visualisation exercise could be a creature with "U: This cannot be the target of spells or abilities till end of turn". If you successfully resolved this in response to a Shock, the Shock would "fizzle" (be countered by game rules). But someone could still cast a Shock in response to this ability being played, and potentially kill the creature before the ability resolved... –  thesunneversets Aug 23 '11 at 22:58
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Responding to your edit:

What I really wanted to know is that if someone uses for example Shock on my creature can I say at that moment "Ok, I will spend 2 mana and regenerate my creature" or when that Shock is played it is resolved immediately any my creature is destroyed (assuming that it has 1 toughness and no regeneration shield on it)

How the rules of Magic work is as follows:

Your opponent pays 1 red mana and casts Shock. Shock is now placed "on the stack". Assuming that neither you nor your opponent want to play any spells or abilities in response, Shock "resolves", your creature takes 2 damage, and, assuming its toughness is 2 or less, goes to the graveyard.

However, you do want to do something, which is regenerate your creature! With Shock on the stack, you say "in response, I regenerate" and pay your mana. This puts the ability on the stack, on top of Shock. Now, assuming neither you nor your opponent want to play any more spells or abilities, the objects on the stack start to resolve from top to bottom (LIFO), thus the ability resolves first and a regeneration shield is created. Now Shock is at the top of the stack; assuming neither you nor your opponent want to play any more spells or abilities, it resolves, and your creature is dealt 2 damage, though this time it survives thanks to the replacement effect provided by its regeneration shield.

Here's an interesting case for you: your opponent casts Shock on your creature. In response, you tap two lands, and use your creature's regeneration ability. In response to this, your opponent taps for another red mana and casts another Shock from his hand! You may at this point be out of mana and unable to respond by using the regeneration ability again. In this case your creature is toast, despite trying to regenerate, as the second Shock will resolve before anything else...

Hope this helps you visualise how the stack works - it's quite hard until you suddenly "get it", and then it's pretty easy, I promise you!

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Thanks for the clear explanation. By the way can a regenerate effect be countered by - for example - a blue player who has a lot of counters? And if he counters it can I cast regenerate again for 2 additional mana? –  Adam Arold Aug 26 '11 at 13:26
    
@edem - Regeneration isn't a spell, so it can't be countered by most blue counters (which say "counter target spell"). It can be countered by a spell which says "counter target activated ability", e.g. a Stifle. And yes, if some counters your regeneration ability with Stifle there is nothing to stop you regenerating again, either in response to the Stifle or after it has resolved. –  thesunneversets Aug 26 '11 at 13:30
    
It is a creature ability I think. Thanks anyway. :) –  Adam Arold Aug 26 '11 at 13:33
    
@edem It's still an activated ability, if it has a cost preceding a colon on the card. The other type of ability is a triggered ability ("When [x], [do y]"). An activated ability can appear on any type of permanent, including creatures. –  thesunneversets Aug 26 '11 at 14:10
    
Oh yes, and there are static abilities, which are basically the ones that are "always on". But all abilities fall into one of those three categories, including all creature abilities :) –  thesunneversets Aug 26 '11 at 14:17
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The way regeneration works is that, when a creature is regenerated, it receives protection from the next effect that would put it into the graveyard equivalent to the "destroy" action. So, if your creature would receive lethal damage or be targeted by a Doom Blade or something, you can activate regeneration, and when the effect occurs, the destruction part of the effect is ignored, and instead the creature is tapped, if it wasn't already. (So a creature with lethal damage has the damage removed, but the creature remains in play.) The regeneration "shield" only protects against the first such effect; if your creature has two toughness and there are two Lightning Bolts on the stack targeting it, you'll need to activate its regeneration ability twice to keep it from dying. Regeneration also doesn't protect against effects that exile the creature, sacrifice effects, or effects that specify that the creature is destroyed and cannot be regenerated.

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