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In collectible card games there is usually a maximum number of each card one can use in a deck for constructed formats. As a reference, take Magic: The Gathering where most formats allow for 4 of each card (except basic lands) to be played in each deck.

Is there a similar limit to the number of cards in a Netrunner CCG deck?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Nope, there are no card limits. (Except for the Agenda limit in the Corp deck, there are no deck design limits of any kind.)

This was a reaction by Richard Garfield to a design mistake in Magic. Originally he thought rarity alone would keep powerful cards balanced, not anticipating the way the collector market would grow. WotC shortly learned that rarity was irrelevant for this; powerful cards also needed to be high-cost.

In the next two games, Jyhad and NetRunner, the design team tried to make sure that every card was costed correctly and not game-breaking even en masse. So neither game had a card limit.

(They didn't always do a perfect job, so some tournaments impose card limits, but the game rules don't.)

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Really interesting, but basically my dream of having a 'playset' of every card in the game seems rather unfeasible. –  rahzark Jan 16 '12 at 15:04
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@rahzark: Well, it doesn't mean that you would put mass multiples of every card in the deck, only that it's legal. In practice, you very rarely play more than 2-3 of most cards. The exceptions are (1) single-card-based 'trick' decks and (2) a few key cards that work so well you often see 6-10 of them in a deck. (The typical example is "Accounts Receivable" for the Corp; "Misleading Access Menus" is also common. Runner decks are much less likely to play more than 6 of any card, unless they're built around one card.) –  Tynam Jan 16 '12 at 15:18
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