Take the 2-minute tour ×
Board & Card Games Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who like playing board games, designing board games or modifying the rules of existing board games. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Example 1) Let's say I have some random creature with protection from white, and my opponent plays Day of Judgment, a white card with the effect "Destroy all creatures." Can my creature with protection from white be destroyed by a white card that isn't actually targeting it specifically?

Example 2) I was playing a match with a friend where I had Elite Inquisitor on the field against his 3 zombies. Is he able to declare his zombies as blockers even though Elite Inquisitor has "protection" from zombies? If he can declare them as blockers, does protection mean that no damage is dealt by the zombies to Elite Inquisitor?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes, Day of Judgement will destroy a creature with Protection from White.

(from AlexP) No, Elite Inquisitor cannot be blocked by Zombies. Elite Inquisitor can, block Zombies normally. If a Zombie would assign combat damage to him, it is prevented and he takes no damage instead.

Protection from {quality}, grants four different things that can be easily remembered from the acronym, DEBT.

Creatures with Protection from {quality} cannot be:

  • D amaged, by sources with that quality (the damage is prevented).

  • E nchanted / E quipped, by cards with that quality.

  • B locked, by creatures with that quality.

  • T argeted, by spells or abilities from sources with that quality.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding the E for Equipment/Enchantment, this skill could work against my creature, right? Let's say I have protection from White, and that I have a nice White Enchantment or White Equipment in my own hand that will give my creature +3/+3, but since my creature is "Protected from White" it won't be able to assign the Enchantment/Equipment to my creature, I am right? Or the protection is only from cards played by other players? –  Abel Morelos Sep 17 '12 at 22:18
    
@AbelMorelos, normally you should ask this in a different quesrion, but...It works regardless of the controller of the Enchantment/Equipment. I.E. Pasifism won't be able to enchant a pro-white creature, and neither will Behemoth Sledge. –  user1873 Sep 18 '12 at 1:29
    
Protection also prevents Fortification by cards with {quality}, but that breaks the nice mnemonic, and there's only one card with Fortify anyway. :) (The technical term replacing Enchant, Equip, and Fortify is that you can't Attach objects with {quality} to the protected permanent.) –  Brian S Aug 25 at 14:56

Protection is a rather busy keyword. The easiest way to remember it is the mnemonic "DEBT".

A permanent or player with protection from a quality cannot be: (from user1873's answer)

  • D amaged, by sources with that quality (the damage is prevented).

  • E nchanted / E quipped, by cards with that quality.

  • B locked, by creatures with that quality.

  • T argeted, by spells or abilities from sources with that quality.

So, in your example:

Elite Inquisitor cannot be blocked by Zombies.

Elite Inquisitor can, however, block Zombies normally. If a Zombie would deal combat damage to him, it is prevented and he takes 0 damage instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Nit: s/and he takes 0 damage instead/and he takes no damage instead/. One cannot deal 0 damage. –  ikegami Jun 24 '12 at 8:47

Zombies cannot be declared as blockers against a creature with Protection from Zombies.

The Comprehensive Rules:

702.15f Attacking creatures with protection can't be blocked by creatures that have the stated quality.

If the Zombies somehow deal damage to the Elite Inquisitor, like with an Ulvenwald Tracker:

702.15e Any damage that would be dealt by sources that have the stated quality to a permanent or player with protection is prevented.

See Section 702.15 for more information about Protection.

share|improve this answer

Yes, it can.

In a nutshell, Protection from X on a creature means:

  • The creature can't be targeted by X spells or abilities from source with X.
  • It can't be blocked by X creatures.
  • Damage from X sources is prevented.
  • Auras with quality X on that creature are destroyed, equipments with quality X fall off (but are not destroyed).

Day of Judgment or similar cards do not target any creatures, and they deal no damage. Therefore, Protection would not protect that creature.

Reference:

702.15. Protection

702.15a Protection is a static ability, written "Protection from [quality]." This quality is usually a color (as in "protection from black") but can be any characteristic value. If the quality happens to be a card name, it is treated as such only if the protection ability specifies that the quality is a name. If the quality is a card type, subtype, or supertype, the ability applies to sources that are permanents with that card type, subtype, or supertype and to any sources not on the battlefield that are of that card type, subtype, or supertype. This is an exception to rule 109.2.

702.15b A permanent or player with protection can't be targeted by spells with the stated quality and can't be targeted by abilities from a source with the stated quality.

702.15c A permanent or player with protection can't be enchanted by Auras that have the stated quality. Such Auras attached to the permanent or player with protection will be put into their owners' graveyards as a state-based action. (See rule 704, "State-Based Actions.")

702.15d A permanent with protection can't be equipped by Equipment that have the stated quality or fortified by Fortifications that have the stated quality. Such Equipment or Fortifications become unattached from that permanent as a state-based action, but remain on the battlefield. (See rule 704, "State-Based Actions.")

702.15e Any damage that would be dealt by sources that have the stated quality to a permanent or player with protection is prevented.

702.15f Attacking creatures with protection can't be blocked by creatures that have the stated quality.

702.15g "Protection from [quality A] and from [quality B]" is shorthand for "protection from [quality A]" and "protection from [quality B]"; it behaves as two separate protection abilities. If an effect causes an object with such an ability to lose protection from [quality A], for example, that object would still have protection from [quality B].

702.15h "Protection from all [characteristic]" is shorthand for "protection from [quality A]," "protection from [quality B]," and so on for each possible quality the listed characteristic could have; it behaves as multiple separate protection abilities. If an effect causes an object with such an ability to lose protection from [quality A], for example, that object would still have protection from [quality B], [quality C], and so on.

702.15i "Protection from everything" is a variant of the protection ability. A permanent with protection from everything has protection from each object regardless of that object's characteristic values. Such a permanent can't be targeted by spells or abilities, enchanted by Auras, equipped by Equipment, fortified by Fortifications, or blocked by creatures, and all damage that would be dealt to it is prevented.

702.15j Multiple instances of protection from the same quality on the same permanent or player are redundant.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.