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I play in a bridge "round robin" using Chicago scoring, with three other people. Call them, A, B, and C, with three different styles. A will open, say one spade with as few as ten high card points (HCP) and a 6-4 or 5-5 distribution, or 11 hcp and a 5-4 distribution using the "rule of 20." (The sum of hcp and length in the top two suits needs ot equal 20.)

B bids "Standard American."

C will never open with less than 13 hcp, sometimes passing with them, and needing 14.

Suppose I have 6 points as a responder. I will sometimes pass with A, unless I have something extra, like a fourth trump or a good sequence (KQ, or QJT), but bid with B. With C, I may shade my points down to 5 with "something extra."

In a tournament, when paired with A or C, I should disclose our unusual bidding practices, right?

But suppose I do this in a round robin when I will be partnered with A for four hands, B for four hands, and C for four hands, etc. Is this objectionable?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It is legitimate, as long you disclose the known tendencies to the opponents.

If you don't, it is similar to having undisclosed agreements.

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In a tournament, I'd have to disclose. In a round robin, I'm assuming that A, B, and C "know, or ought to know" each others' tendencies. –  Tom Au Jul 2 '12 at 13:57
    
@TomAu: "Know or ought to know" is not good enough reason to not disclose when relevant. –  Aryabhata Jul 2 '12 at 15:55

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