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I remember a simple but interesting dice game, I remember the rules but I don't know its name. I would like to know its name to be able to look up stuff about it.

It is played with two 6-sided dice. The score of a throw is the two-digit number built from the two results, the higher number first, except when the two dice roll the same, these are worth more. For example, 32 is beaten by 51 which in turn is beaten by 22 (double-two).

The players (usually 3, 4 or slightly more) take turns throwing both dice but hiding the result, and announcing it loudly. The next player has to say a bigger score than the previous one (except for a double-six, which, if I remember correctly, can be played on a previous double-six), regardless of his own result. A player, before throwing his own dice, has the possibility to claim that the previous player lied. This, and only this, ends the game. If the previous player told the truth, he wins, if not, the one who exposed him wins.

I hope this is enough to accurately identify the game :)

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1 Answer

Mexicali

It's a variant of Liar's Dice.

The variant in question is, according to Wikipedia, called Mexican or Mexicali, and is typically a drinking game. My preference is for Mexicali.

Other liars dice variants are typically 5 dice, not two, but the play's much the same.

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I was going to say it sounded like a Liar's Dice variant. Sounds cool, I might have to try it some time. –  Johno Jul 28 '12 at 7:52
    
While it sounds very much like what I'm looking for, it seems that this "Mexicali" is only derived from it. The description says that 21 is bigger than 66. This changes a lot of things, because the chance of a 21 is twice as big as that of a 66. –  vsz Jul 28 '12 at 8:58
    
It changes little, vsz - such games have a lot of variations, and the description in Wikipedia is one such local variation misconstrued as more widespread. –  aramis Aug 24 '12 at 4:41
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