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Jandor's Ring

A 2004 Oracle ruling for Jandor Ring, above, states:

If you do not have the card still in your hand, you can't pay the cost. There is currently no way to prove that it was the card you drew except to get a judge or 3rd party involved, or to put cards you draw aside until you decide whether or not to use this.

This sounds incredibly mimsy in an age where the Miracle mechanic exists and is (I would hope) watertight for tournament play.

How does Jandor's Ring work under latest MtG rules?

ETA: If you (say) just resolved Divination, and wanted to use Jandor's Ring, could you discard either of the two cards drawn, just the last one drawn, or what? (Sorry to be so obsessed about the arcane workings of a card which presumably never actually sees non-casual play...)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Jandor Ring doesn't work under the current MtG rules. Luckily, it is too expensive in converted mana cost to see serious tournament play, but if it was your answer exists within the ruling you quoted. The current rules don't support a way of doing this, technically. (Edit: You added an additional question regarding which card could be discarded from a multi-card draw spell. If you examine the Oracle wording in the online Gatherer, you will note that you can only discard the last drawn card.)

402.3. A player may arrange his or her hand in any convenient fashion and look at it as much as he or she wishes. A player can’t look at the cards in another player’s hand but may count those cards at any time.

Because the current rules don't support the card, because there is no easy way to achieve the desired behavior, the rulings tell you how to handle using the card.

get a judge or put cards you draw aside until you decide whether or not to use this.

This is similar to the effect, but even more restrictive than a card like Sylvan Library (which has seen tournament play). With this card, you must keep cards you drew this turn separate from the cards that are in your hand if you intend on returning one of those cards this turn. (example: Brainstorm cast during your upkeep). The rules don't specifically tell you to keep your hand separate from the Brainstorm cards, but if you intend to return a Brainstorm card, you must keep them separate to preserve the game state.

You might be interested in this thread on the subject of cards currently not supported by the rules.

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+1 for mentioning Sylvan Library as a guide for how to handle this. –  Alex P Jul 30 '12 at 16:28
    
Mm, I guess there's no realistic way of working this apart from keeping drawn cards separate, until you make the decision to use the Ring or not. The judge thing perplexed me a bit, does it really mean try to persuade a judge to stand behind you while you have Jandor's Ring in play, to watch that you only discard legally from your hand? I guess that's feasible if they're not too overstretched... –  thesunneversets Jul 30 '12 at 16:28
    
@thesunneversets, like I said in my answer, you don't need to keep it physically separate; you could simply mark it somehow. For example, you could take it out of its sleeve. You could slide a bookmark into its sleeve. You could use a paperclip. You could reveal it and keep it revealed like one does for Miracle. etc. –  ikegami Jul 30 '12 at 16:57
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I read the thread mentioned in the last paragraph and it gave me a headache. –  rahzark Jul 30 '12 at 17:02
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I would advise you to not under any circumstances in a sanctioned match at CREL or higher to intentionally cause a card to become a marked card without first verifying with the head judge that this is an acceptable way to manage the ability in their tournament. (I would tell you not to do it and keep the card separate, since I basically have no choice but to give you an infraction if you accidentally shuffle it back in without un-marking it.) –  Affe Jul 30 '12 at 20:11

To answer your edit, "Draw two cards" is parsed by the rules as "Draw a card. Draw a card." For the current oracle wording of Jandor's Ring, "the last card you drew this turn" is in fact distinctly the second one picked up from Divination. It's two draw events in succession, not a simultaneous addition of two cards.

120.2. Cards may only be drawn one at a time. If a player is instructed to draw multiple cards, that player performs that many individual card draws.

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Miracle achieves it's function by revealing the card and keeping it revealed.

702.92b If a player chooses to reveal a card using its miracle ability, he or she plays with that card revealed until that card leaves his or her hand, that ability resolves, or that ability otherwise leaves the stack.

Jandor's Ring it better that Miracle since you don't have to reveal the card. All you have to do is set it aside (literally or by marking it). For example, you could take it out of its sleeve. You could slide a bookmark into its sleeve. You could use a paperclip. You could reveal it and keep it revealed like one does for Miracle. etc.

put cards you draw aside until you decide whether or not to use this.

(From a ruling for Jandor's Ring.)

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