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Whilst playing carrom, if only one piece is remaining of each player, e.g. one white and one black and a queen, and I pot a queen, what happens in the following scenario:

While covering the queen with my piece, mistakenly I cover both the remaining pieces, and now there are no pieces on board.

In such a case, who wins the game?

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I never heard this game but maybe official laws can help you - icf-media.beepworld.de/laws-of-carrom.htm –  Dor Cohen Jul 30 '12 at 13:30
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1 Answer

You win and are awarded 3 points (or 1 point if the score is 22+)

This can be verified on the International Carrom Federation rule book, as long as you made a proper stroke.

102) a) While covering the Queen a player pockets the last C/m of his own together with the last C/m of his opponent by a proper stroke, he shall be awarded 3 points. If the score is 22 or more he shall win by 1 point.

b) While covering the Queen, if a player pockets the last C/m of his own together with the last C/m of his opponent by an improper stroke the opponent shall win by three points. If the score is 22 or more he shall win by one point. if demanded, an additional point for the improper stroke shall be awarded to the opponent.

This is of course assuming that you didn't pocket the Striker as well. In that case you lose.

109) a) If a player pockets the Queen, his last C/m, the last C/m of his opponent by a proper stroke together with the Striker, the player shall lose the Board by 3 points. If the score of the opponent is 22 or more, he shall lose by one point. One additional point for the pocketed striker shall be awarded, if demanded by the opponent.

b) ... improper Stroke ...

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