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Say a player casts a card that returns a permanent to the top of owner's library, for example Banishment Decree, and the targeted creature card he chooses has two Auras enchanting it. Where do the Aura enchantments go, to the players hand, graveyard or library?

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Your question doesn't make any sense, what card are you speaking about specifically? Disempower, Excommunicate, or Banishment Decree (some other card). Your title doesn't match the text...what is being targeted, the Aura/Enchantment, the Creature, the player or something else? –  user1873 Nov 22 '12 at 16:35

3 Answers 3

It goes to the graveyard.

You seem to be under the misconception that Auras follow the permanent to which they are attached to the graveyard. That's not the case. It's just a coincidence that both end up in the same place.

When an object changes zone (e.g. goes from the battlefield to the graveyard), it becomes a brand new object. The original object ceases to exist, and a new one is created in the new zone.

400.7. An object that moves from one zone to another becomes a new object with no memory of, or relation to, its previous existence. There are seven exceptions to this rule: [...]

No matter whether the enchanted permanent goes to the graveyard or to the player's library, the object the Aura was enchanting has ceased to exist. The game doesn't tolerate that since Auras are suppose to enchant something, so it sends the Aura to the graveyard.

303.4c If an Aura is enchanting an illegal object or player as defined by its enchant ability and other applicable effects, the object it was attached to no longer exists, or the player it was attached to has left the game, the Aura is put into its owner’s graveyard. (This is a state-based action. See rule 704.)

If it was an Equipment or Fortification instead, it would remain on the battlefield unattached.

704.5p If an Equipment or Fortification is attached to an illegal permanent, it becomes unattached from that permanent. It remains on the battlefield.

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+1 more relevant the differences between Equipment and Auras are, humgh. –  user1873 Nov 22 '12 at 20:02

Assuming when you say 'Enchantment' you specifically mean 'Aura', they are sent to the graveyard.

Bold is mine.

303.4c If an Aura is enchanting an illegal object or player as defined by its enchant ability and other applicable effects, the object it was attached to no longer exists, or the player it was attached to has left the game, the Aura is put into its owner's graveyard. (This is a state-based action. See rule 704.)

Some popular cards, like Rancor and Angelic Destiny, may appear to violate this rule. There are a number of cards that have triggers that will pop the Aura out of the graveyard and send it to your hand. Many players will take the shortcut of simply taking the card from the battlefield to their hand instead of taking the intermediate step of putting it in the graveyard. If there's any confusion about such a short cut, make sure to ask your opponent or call a judge, because you do have an opportunity to respond before the trigger resolves while the card is still in the graveyard.

Also, if you were referring to another enchantment type you'll have to clarify. As far as I'm aware, only Auras can attach to creatures and other permanents.

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If an object ceases to exist, and creatures can only exist on the battlefield, any Auras attached to the creature are placed in their owner's graveyard as a state-based action.

303.4c If an Aura is enchanting an illegal object or player as defined by its enchant ability and other applicable effects, the object it was attached to no longer exists, or the player it was attached to has left the game, the Aura is put into its owner’s graveyard. (This is a state-based action. See rule 704.)

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