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I'm building a prototype with stackable tiles in several different shapes. I 3D-printed some tiles that lock together nicely, but it is too expensive to 3D-print all the tiles I need to make multiple copies.

My solution so far is printing out the tiles on card stock, gluing to a bristol (i.e. presentation board) covering with a plastic sheet usually used to cover books. On the bottom I glue a layer of non slide rubber sheet to encourage pieces to stay in place.

I then cut the board into tiles with a utility knife and a straight edge.

  1. Does anyone have better ways of making tiles that don't slide much?
  2. I am making the game board the same way but I am having trouble getting the bubbles out from under the coating. Any tips?
  3. Can a stack paper cutter be used to cut out the tiles which are 4 layers thick?
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You could try cutting several layers of the bristol with a power saw (before gluing). I could imagine chop saw/band saw/circular saw working pretty well. –  Gregor Dec 21 '12 at 18:22
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3D-print one and 3D-photocopy it multiple times! (Sorry, it's the only answer that poped out of my mind. I hope it made you smile despite the fact it wasn't helpful) –  Oltarus Dec 23 '12 at 15:43

2 Answers 2

Best bet for multiple "3d" sets: 3-D Print off a master of each type, then use resin casting to make as many as you need. Or use a single type, and print circular labels that go inside a recess.


As for bubble removal - an insulin syringe. that microfine needle barely leaves a mark, and can suck half a cc of air out.

It's better, however, to not get bubbles in the first place... so, you set an edge past the edge of the meaningful area, the use a rolling pin or squeegee to press it flat from there over. I've also found it better to expose the lamination and put the paper onto it, than to place the laminate onto the paper.

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You could use full sheet magnetic labels. Print onto cardstock, adhere magnetic sheet to the back, cut out tiles.

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