A 4 player trick-taking card game where opposing partners try to either take the number of tricks they bid or prevent their opponents from doing so.

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9
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7answers
893 views

Simplest bidding system for introduction into bridge

What is the best bidding system which can be used for teaching beginners (who never played bridge before)? I suspect that showing any complicated system, or asking to learn some long manual would ...
10
votes
5answers
397 views

What is the point in disclosure of the bidding system to opponents?

I fully understand and agree with the rule "do not communicate in illegal ways" (pose, tone of voice, etc), but I don't quite understand the point in requiring the disclosure of one's bidding system ...
4
votes
2answers
199 views

Which bidding system is assumed by default at BBO?

Which bidding system is assumed by default at Bridge Base Online (for humans)? I asked in chat several times in different games (ten times I think) and nobody answered. Is it Bridge base basic? Or ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Interpreting bidding by partners

RHO: 1C --> LHO: 1S --> RHO: 2D Does this mean 4-4 in clubs/diamonds, or 5-4 in clubs diamonds. Is it a reverse? (e.g.18+ pts?). Assuming opponents play SAYC.
-1
votes
1answer
125 views

Analyzing bidding sequence

My left opponent opened 1S - Right-side opponent responded 2H (I understood: 11+, 4+ card heart suit, shortness in spades) - L.O. responded 2S - R.O. responded 3D (has shortness of spades). R.O. : 4 ...
2
votes
3answers
232 views

Responding to a simple overcall (SAYC)

LHO opened with 1C – Partner overcalled with 1S – (I have 6 pts, 4 Spades) → Do I respond with 2S? P.S. rho pass. EDIT : what my gripe with this is, that according to textbooks, you respond to ...
0
votes
3answers
539 views

What is the meaning of “count your losers” at no trump, and “count your winners” for a trump contract?

Are no trump bidders taught to "count your losers" because their 25-26 points represents enough material for nine tricks so that they should "play not to lose" (i.e. to prevent their opponents from ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Overcall of 3S over 1C opening, what does it show? (assuming bidding system SAYC)

I assumed it was 10+pts, and 7 Spade suit -- am I correct?
1
vote
1answer
183 views

In bridge, what level of strength do different systems require to bid a short minor?

Most players will bid 1 spade with (s) AKJxx (h)Axxx (d)xx (c)xx. That is, 12 hcp and a five card major. If you "redistribute" the two spade spots, you get: (s) AKJ (h)Axxx (d)xxx (c)xxx. Many ...
3
votes
2answers
388 views

In bridge, what caused bidding “standards” to decline post Goren?

I was weaned on "Goren" in the 1960s, and as some readers of my other questions have pointed out, am not totally comfortable with "Standard American" or other newer standards. These may be some ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

Is there a way to quantify the effects of luck versus skill in rubber bridge?

Duplicate bridge was created to "eliminate" the luck factor. That is partnerships are compared only against other partnerships playing the same cards. Rubber bridge is a different animal. Here, "luck ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Question on leading

In bridge, what is the priority in leading when partner bid spades, and contract is clubs, and I have ace and queen of spades. Does the rule "do not underlead an ace" here override the rule "lead with ...
0
votes
2answers
180 views

In bridge, does a declarer “need to” locate all 52 cards during the play of a trump contract?

This was recommended by author Terence Reese (and several members of the site). But I was taught differently, at least as declarer. That is, I was taught to count "trumps and honors." So, if you are ...
7
votes
5answers
420 views

In bridge, how can you “see” (locate) most of 52 cards halfway into the play?

Author Terence Reese wrote that the difference between amateurs and professional was that the former could "see" (locate) only 26 cards, while professionals could "see" 52 before the hand was over. ...
3
votes
2answers
129 views

Opener rebid priority

I'm playing/studying SAYC. So I know that game in major comes first then notrump then game in minors. When I open with 1 Club partner responds with 1 Spade -- I have 18PTS and 4 hearts and NT ...
8
votes
2answers
162 views

Question on ethics or rules

I would very much like to know the correct ethical procedure for the following play. Hearts are trump. West led a small club North played a small club East played a small spade I as South played a ...
5
votes
5answers
285 views

What are some good introductory rules to bridge?

I've tried to learn how to play bridge before, but there are so many variations (even on the Wikipedia page) that it's hard to keep track of everything and pin down exactly one way of playing it that ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

In bridge, are “sequences” more valuable than non-sequences of similar point count?

In backgammon, for instance, sequences of "points" are more valuable than the same number of points out of sequence. That is the 6-5, or 6-5-4 points, are more valuable than the 6-4, or 6-4-2 points ...
3
votes
2answers
145 views

In bridge, do people go through cycles of under- and -over bidding?

In the board game Go, there are two basic styles, high and low. "High" is all the rage for about ten years, until people have forgotten how to play "low." Then "low" gets "rediscovered," and people ...
4
votes
3answers
141 views

Are there many mandated “time outs” in tournament bridge?

In "Points, Schmoints," Marty Bergen related an instance in which he announced "skip bid," before "jumping" his partner's two diamond bid to the five level (instead of three). According to him, his ...
7
votes
3answers
167 views

Can one ask for a “time out” to study the hand in bridge?

"West" (the opening leader) has to lead before seeing the dummy. Both declarer (South) and partner (East) ought to study the dummy before playing. But often they do not. Suppose South wins the trick, ...
4
votes
1answer
144 views

Is a “drop-finesse” better than a simple “drop” play with a nine card suit in bridge?

Regarding finesses for a missing queen in a key (e.g. trump suit), there is a proverb of "eight ever [always] nine never." Instead, one is supposed to play for a drop. (This, and most other proverbs ...
2
votes
2answers
71 views

In bridge, should a defender play differently with most, about half, or few of the partnership's points?

This example is from Victor Mollo's "Test Your Defense, Where the Points are Won." You are East. The bidding has been 1NT pass 3NT pass. West leads what looks to be the fourth highest spade. You ...
2
votes
4answers
176 views

In bridge, does it make sense to “tighten” or 'loosen" up on bidding depending on vulnerability?

For instance, the minimum standard seems to be about 12 points to open with a five card suit, or 13 points with a four card minor. That makes sense with equal vulnerability (both vulnerable or both ...
2
votes
3answers
275 views

When should a bridge defender return the second, rather than fourth highest card in suit?

Against a bidding sequence of 1NT, 3NT, partner, West, opens with what looks like the fourth highest of a suit. Dummy goes down with two small cards in the suit. I have four to the king in the suit, ...
4
votes
3answers
194 views

Bridge bidding - how do I decide whether or not to bid 1NT with weakness in a particular suit?

If I'm inclined to bid NT with 15-17 points, but am weak in one suit, how weak can I be, and still bid 1NT, as opposed to bidding 1 club, to find out if my partner can show strength e.g. a stopper in ...
7
votes
4answers
358 views

How can I practice my opening leads in bridge?

After playing bridge for several months, I feel my declarer play and bidding have improved to a beginner-intermediate level. However, I think my skill at making an opening lead is that of a novice at ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

What are ways to “read” the shape of your opponents' hands early on?

Toward the end, the shape of opponents' hands can be read by "counting" (playing out two or three suits and inferring the shape of the remaining one(s)). In the beginning, one looks for more subtle ...
12
votes
2answers
195 views

Hesitating as bluff

The contracting player leads a trump. As the next player I make an obvious hesitation before playing my singleton 10 of trumps. At the end of the hand my opponent, who did not call the director, ...
6
votes
3answers
249 views

In bridge, can “good” players get away with bidding “light”?

The conventional wisdom is that it takes 26 points to make a game. But authors such as Terence Reese have written compendiums of how they made games with 23-25 points by "outplaying" the defense; ...
2
votes
3answers
250 views

Should I respond to 1 NT in a suit or NT holding 17 HCP and a void?

My partner opened a "strong" one NT. I am holding: ♠ void ♥ KJxx ♦ AKQxxx ♣ KJx What should I bid?
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Which way to capture a queen?

This is a problem from today's New York Post. You (South) are in a stretchy major suit contract with only 22 high card points. You have four top tricks outside the trump suit, and have just won a ...
4
votes
2answers
186 views

In bridge,should a responder devalue her hand if short in opener's suit?

I opened a "strong two clubs." Partner bid 2 NT, which between us, meant "9-plus points, slam interest." I bid my suit, 3 spades, with the following: (s) AKQxxx (h) AKx (d) Ax (c) xx. That's a ...
4
votes
1answer
225 views

In bridge, what are exceptions to “third hand high?”

You are sitting "East" (with dummy to your right), and your partner West leads a low (presumably fourth best) card in a suit against a 3 no trump contract. When dummy plays low from "nothing," and you ...
9
votes
2answers
150 views

Can't understand the meaning of 'heart finesse'

What does the phrase heart finesse mean? It appears to be a card term: http://www.confsudbridge.org/hits/brbm0014i.aspx Think about it a little: if the heart finesse was necessary to the ...
1
vote
3answers
143 views

Are there times to pre-empt with a “strong” six trumps in bridge?

Suppose you have something like AQJxxx of clubs (and no other values). If it were any other suit than clubs, I'd open with a with a "weak two" bid. But two clubs is the STRONG two bid. Meaning that ...
3
votes
1answer
179 views

In bridge, how do you tell when to use holdup versus blocking plays?

You are the declarer at a 3NT contract (1NT, 3NT, no opposing bids). West leads what appears to be a five card suit, and you have Axx in dummy. Your main concern is that East can get the setting ...
2
votes
2answers
161 views

Different kinds of “two direction” finesses in bridge?

I once read in a book about a "backward" finesse. You, declarer, have AJ9, and dummy has Kxx. Ordinarily, you would finesse twice from dummy toward AJ9. Except that your left hand opponent has ...
4
votes
3answers
321 views

In bridge, are there some 13 point hands that should not be opened?

Suppose you have: (s) Jx (h)KQxx (d) KJxx (c) Kxx. That's 13 points, by the usual count. But I can think of at least two things wrong with it. First, there are no aces, meaning that the hand has ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

In bridge, is an “uppercut” a special case of a “forcing game?”

In a standard forcing game, you the defender, may have four (or more) trumps, and ypu lead a long suit in which declarer is void in order to force him to ruff, thereby shortening his trumps to your ...
3
votes
2answers
123 views

How to identify when to try a “Merriamac Coup” in bridge?

A "Merrimac Coup" in bridge usually refers to the "suicidal" lead of a king, in order to force out an opposing ace before the opponent is ready to use the ace as an entry. If that hand (usually dummy) ...
2
votes
2answers
127 views

How do you decide which way to finesse for an ace?

This is from the New York Post, which is to say that it is a "problem." You are declarer (South) in a 3 no trump contract. You get a "friendly" lead in a suit where you have three winners (two in ...
6
votes
2answers
172 views

In Bridge, what is the punishment for misclaiming tricks?

Down to the last two rounds in rubber bridge. Declarer claims remaining tricks only to discover that he has miscounted. He claims the two tricks with Q-10; however, opponent holds the J and ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Bridge - Counting and Visualising

Been playing Bridge for a couple of years now. Have improved in bidding, strategy and other stuff. But one place where there is no improvement is counting and visualising. At best, I can keep track ...
3
votes
3answers
259 views

Can a takeout doubler pass a redoubled contract?

South opened one diamond. West doubled for takeout with the following hand: s) Axxx (H) Kxx (D) Kxx (C) Qxx North redoubled. This took me (East) off the hook with something like s) xxx (H) xxx (D) ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

Response to “convenient” minor bid.

My partner opened 1 Club. I held Spade J732, Diamond Axxxx, Club QJxx, Heart VOID. She was upset that I bid two clubs rather than 1 Spade. I did not think the Spade suit was good enough to bid. What ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

In Bridge, should a defender “encourage” with a "stranded honor?

In the example in Today's New York Post, the bidding went: S 1 spade, N 2 clubs, S 2 NT, N3 spades, S 4 Spades (East and West passed throughout). West led the 9 of hearts, which as between these ...
8
votes
2answers
269 views

In bridge, what are some exceptions to “second hand low?”

Most beginners are taught to play "second hand low." That is, play a low card if one is led to them, to give the partner a chance to take the trick. This is particularly to avoid situations where ...
1
vote
2answers
314 views

In bridge, can the “rule of 20” be used outside of opening bids (e.g for takeout doubles)?

Here's another example from today's New York Post. West opened 1 club. (He had a 19 point 1NT hand, and was planning to re-bid 2NT.) North made a (takeout) double with (s) KQxxx (h) Qxxxx (d) xx (c) ...
3
votes
1answer
120 views

Is it right to refrain from making a takeout double in borderline situations?

In today's bridge column, this example was given: North opened with one diamond. East doubled with (s) Qxx (h)AQxx (d) x (c) ATxxx. This double technically met my 14 point requirement (12 for high ...