A 4 player trick-taking card game where opposing partners try to either take the number of tricks they bid or prevent their opponents from doing so.

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3
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2answers
378 views

In bridge, what opening bid(s) should be made with a high card point in “no man's land”?

Recently, I was dealt a hand with a high card point and distribution too strong to open 1 NT but not enough to bid 2 of a suit, i.e. in "no man's land". Any advice you can provide about how I should ...
0
votes
2answers
365 views

What to bid in this situation (xx-Kx-AQTxx-AQxx, 1D-1S-2C-2D…)? (System: Simple SAYC)

I open 1D -- Partner 1S -- I bid 2C (my holding was xx-Kx-AQTxx-AQxx) -- Partner bids 2D -- What do I bid, and why? (since I have to respond when partner keeps changing suit and no NT has been yet ...
4
votes
1answer
238 views

Simplest form of RKCB - asking for kings after asking for queen

According to wikipedia on RKCB, after an 03 or 14 response ...the 4NT bidder may ask about [the queen] using the cheapest bid other than five of the trump suit. The code for replies to that "queen ...
4
votes
4answers
610 views

When and how do you use suit preference signals in bridge?

One example is when you (West) lead a singleton against a trump contract, hopefully to your partner's ace, s/he takes it, and then East leads back a spot card in the suit for you to ruff. Besides the ...
3
votes
2answers
224 views

In bridge, if a 1 NT bidder is doubled, is it right to “redouble for rescue?”

Suppose South opens with 1 NT (15-17). After two passes, East doubles, showing possession of most of the remaining 23-25 high card points not held by South. 1NT P P Dbl South has a flat 4-3-3-3 ...
4
votes
2answers
373 views

How do I bid using “weak Stayman” (or garbage stayman)

People like Marty Bergen have written things like, "almost anytime you're responding to your partner's 1NT and you have few clubs, you should respond 2 clubs," Stayman (this is a paraphrase, not an ...
1
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2answers
62 views

In bridge, is there a way to determine when and where to “transfer control” to defeat a squeeze?

I am West, defending a no trump contract. (No bids by our side, no other bids than NT by the opponents.) We're down to the last few cards, and I have two suits, call them diamonds and clubs, like ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

In rubber bridge, when should you “lead your partner's suit rather than your own?”

With equal vulnerability, opponents bid 1 club, 1 spade, 1NT, 3NT. I'm sitting West, opening from: (s) xxx (h) J8732 (d) T9x (c) xx. I don't fancy leading my ragged hearts suit with no side entry. ...
2
votes
3answers
186 views

In bridge, how much support do you need to raise a responder?

Suppose I bid one of a (short) minor. Partner responds one of a major (one-over-one), showing at least four cards in the suit. What do I need to raise his major to two? Some books say I need four ...
3
votes
4answers
197 views

I open 1C — Partner: 1D — I bid 1S — Partner bids 2NT - What 2NT means (System: Simple SAYC)

I open 1C -- Partner 1D -- I respond 1S -- Partner bids 2NT - What 2NT means, and how do I respond to it with this hand: Kxxx-Kx-xx-AQxxx? Note: since I'm studying simple sayc what concerns me is ...
4
votes
1answer
125 views

How is bridge for beginners taught in Taiwan or Italy today, Precision or another method?

I play duplicate bridge, and have recently begun studying the Precision bidding system on my own. Precision was invented by C.C. Wei in the 1960's with Truscott's assistance, and was used with great ...
3
votes
2answers
290 views

Opening bids with no long suits

My partner and I play a strong NT and 5 card Majors. However, we're unsure how to open strong hands with no long suits. For example, how do we open a 4432 hand with 16-19 high card points or 20-22 ...
9
votes
3answers
152 views

American Five Card majors - using Jacoby to respond to a 2NT opening bid

Playing Bridge last night my partner opened 2NT, showing 20-21 points. I had 11 HCP and a five card major. I used Jacoby Transfer, calling 3 hearts and my partner responded 3 spades (all OK so far) I ...
7
votes
3answers
351 views

Why it is important to make a delayed raise and not jump directly to 4-lvl? (System: simple SAYC)

On responding with 13 pts and 4-card major support why it is important to make a delayed raise (e.g. change suit and only then jump to 4-lvl) and not jump directly to 4-lvl- what added value does it ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Responder' rebid with unbalanced hand (system: Simple SAYC)

I have 1S-4H-4D-4C, 15 PTS. I open 1D -- Partner: 1S --> Now my options are: I can't bid 1NT (no nt distribution). I want to show that I have more than minimum (12-14 pts), so I don't want to bid ...
2
votes
3answers
230 views

Bidding game (simple SAYC)

Partner opens 1D -- I respond 1H -- Partner responds with 2D -- (I have 3 spades, 5 hearts, 1 clubs, 4 diamonds, 13 hcp) --> I'm tempted to bid 3NT now. Should I always get to game with me and partner ...
3
votes
2answers
198 views

Does one need to bid Stayman with a flat distribution?

This example is from a book. South opens 1NT (15-17) with: (s) AKx (h) JTxx (d) Kxx (c) Axx. North has (s) Qxx (h)Axxx (d) Axx (c) xxx and goes to 3NT. The author (George Coffin) says that North ...
7
votes
3answers
164 views

What general approach should be taken opening hands with 3=1=4=5 and 1=3=4=5 shape?

If my hand is not good enough to reverse, what should I do with a hand like Kxx x KJxx AQxxx That is, a minimum opener with a singleton major, 4 diamonds, and 5 clubs (assuming that I'm playing ...
1
vote
3answers
806 views

Opener's rebid of 2NT (system: Simple SAYC)

I opened with 1H - Partner bid 2C - (I have 5 hearts, 12 pts, 3spades 3diamonds 2clubs). I have to respond, but responding 2NT would mean I have 18 pts (my written source on this is: ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Origin of Puppet Stayman

There are many variations, but I presume there was an initial original version of puppet stayman. Does anyone know who came up with it, and why it is named as such? (A google search has been ...
3
votes
4answers
303 views

Question regarding strong 2c opening

Partner opened with 2C -- I responded with 2D (I have 2 pts)-- Partner responded with 3C. Is the rebid 3C by partner forcing me to bid (I don’t have enough clubs) or can I pass here? It's just that ...
9
votes
7answers
1k views

Simplest bidding system for introduction into bridge

What is the best bidding system which can be used for teaching beginners (who never played bridge before)? I suspect that showing any complicated system, or asking to learn some long manual would ...
10
votes
5answers
437 views

What is the point in disclosure of the bidding system to opponents?

I fully understand and agree with the rule "do not communicate in illegal ways" (pose, tone of voice, etc), but I don't quite understand the point in requiring the disclosure of one's bidding system ...
4
votes
2answers
233 views

Which bidding system is assumed by default at BBO?

Which bidding system is assumed by default at Bridge Base Online (for humans)? I asked in chat several times in different games (ten times I think) and nobody answered. Is it Bridge base basic? Or ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Interpreting bidding by partners

RHO: 1C --> LHO: 1S --> RHO: 2D Does this mean 4-4 in clubs/diamonds, or 5-4 in clubs diamonds. Is it a reverse? (e.g.18+ pts?). Assuming opponents play SAYC.
-1
votes
1answer
144 views

Analyzing bidding sequence

My left opponent opened 1S - Right-side opponent responded 2H (I understood: 11+, 4+ card heart suit, shortness in spades) - L.O. responded 2S - R.O. responded 3D (has shortness of spades). R.O. : 4 ...
2
votes
3answers
266 views

Responding to a simple overcall (SAYC)

LHO opened with 1C – Partner overcalled with 1S – (I have 6 pts, 4 Spades) → Do I respond with 2S? P.S. rho pass. EDIT : what my gripe with this is, that according to textbooks, you respond to ...
0
votes
3answers
685 views

What is the meaning of “count your losers” at no trump, and “count your winners” for a trump contract?

Are no trump bidders taught to "count your losers" because their 25-26 points represents enough material for nine tricks so that they should "play not to lose" (i.e. to prevent their opponents from ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Overcall of 3S over 1C opening, what does it show? (assuming bidding system SAYC)

I assumed it was 10+pts, and 7 Spade suit -- am I correct?
1
vote
1answer
194 views

In bridge, what level of strength do different systems require to bid a short minor?

Most players will bid 1 spade with (s) AKJxx (h)Axxx (d)xx (c)xx. That is, 12 hcp and a five card major. If you "redistribute" the two spade spots, you get: (s) AKJ (h)Axxx (d)xxx (c)xxx. Many ...
3
votes
2answers
553 views

In bridge, what caused bidding “standards” to decline post Goren?

I was weaned on "Goren" in the 1960s, and as some readers of my other questions have pointed out, am not totally comfortable with "Standard American" or other newer standards. These may be some ...
1
vote
1answer
138 views

Is there a way to quantify the effects of luck versus skill in rubber bridge?

Duplicate bridge was created to "eliminate" the luck factor. That is partnerships are compared only against other partnerships playing the same cards. Rubber bridge is a different animal. Here, "luck ...
1
vote
2answers
78 views

Question on leading

In bridge, what is the priority in leading when partner bid spades, and contract is clubs, and I have ace and queen of spades. Does the rule "do not underlead an ace" here override the rule "lead with ...
0
votes
2answers
228 views

In bridge, does a declarer “need to” locate all 52 cards during the play of a trump contract?

This was recommended by author Terence Reese (and several members of the site). But I was taught differently, at least as declarer. That is, I was taught to count "trumps and honors." So, if you are ...
7
votes
5answers
563 views

In bridge, how can you “see” (locate) most of 52 cards halfway into the play?

Author Terence Reese wrote that the difference between amateurs and professional was that the former could "see" (locate) only 26 cards, while professionals could "see" 52 before the hand was over. ...
3
votes
2answers
141 views

Opener rebid priority

I'm playing/studying SAYC. So I know that game in major comes first then notrump then game in minors. When I open with 1 Club partner responds with 1 Spade -- I have 18PTS and 4 hearts and NT ...
8
votes
2answers
184 views

Question on ethics or rules

I would very much like to know the correct ethical procedure for the following play. Hearts are trump. West led a small club North played a small club East played a small spade I as South played a ...
5
votes
5answers
333 views

What are some good introductory rules to bridge?

I've tried to learn how to play bridge before, but there are so many variations (even on the Wikipedia page) that it's hard to keep track of everything and pin down exactly one way of playing it that ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

In bridge, are “sequences” more valuable than non-sequences of similar point count?

In backgammon, for instance, sequences of "points" are more valuable than the same number of points out of sequence. That is the 6-5, or 6-5-4 points, are more valuable than the 6-4, or 6-4-2 points ...
2
votes
2answers
180 views

In bridge, do people go through cycles of under- and -over bidding?

In the board game Go, there are two basic styles, high and low. "High" is all the rage for about ten years, until people have forgotten how to play "low." Then "low" gets "rediscovered," and people ...
4
votes
3answers
154 views

Are there many mandated “time outs” in tournament bridge?

In "Points, Schmoints," Marty Bergen related an instance in which he announced "skip bid," before "jumping" his partner's two diamond bid to the five level (instead of three). According to him, his ...
7
votes
3answers
189 views

Can one ask for a “time out” to study the hand in bridge?

"West" (the opening leader) has to lead before seeing the dummy. Both declarer (South) and partner (East) ought to study the dummy before playing. But often they do not. Suppose South wins the trick, ...
4
votes
1answer
175 views

Is a “drop-finesse” better than a simple “drop” play with a nine card suit in bridge?

Regarding finesses for a missing queen in a key (e.g. trump suit), there is a proverb of "eight ever [always] nine never." Instead, one is supposed to play for a drop. (This, and most other proverbs ...
2
votes
2answers
77 views

In bridge, should a defender play differently with most, about half, or few of the partnership's points?

This example is from Victor Mollo's "Test Your Defense, Where the Points are Won." You are East. The bidding has been 1NT pass 3NT pass. West leads what looks to be the fourth highest spade. You ...
2
votes
4answers
197 views

In bridge, does it make sense to “tighten” or 'loosen" up on bidding depending on vulnerability?

For instance, the minimum standard seems to be about 12 points to open with a five card suit, or 13 points with a four card minor. That makes sense with equal vulnerability (both vulnerable or both ...
2
votes
3answers
308 views

When should a bridge defender return the second, rather than fourth highest card in suit?

Against a bidding sequence of 1NT, 3NT, partner, West, opens with what looks like the fourth highest of a suit. Dummy goes down with two small cards in the suit. I have four to the king in the suit, ...
4
votes
3answers
214 views

Bridge bidding - how do I decide whether or not to bid 1NT with weakness in a particular suit?

If I'm inclined to bid NT with 15-17 points, but am weak in one suit, how weak can I be, and still bid 1NT, as opposed to bidding 1 club, to find out if my partner can show strength e.g. a stopper in ...
7
votes
4answers
441 views

How can I practice my opening leads in bridge?

After playing bridge for several months, I feel my declarer play and bidding have improved to a beginner-intermediate level. However, I think my skill at making an opening lead is that of a novice at ...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

What are ways to “read” the shape of your opponents' hands early on?

Toward the end, the shape of opponents' hands can be read by "counting" (playing out two or three suits and inferring the shape of the remaining one(s)). In the beginning, one looks for more subtle ...
13
votes
2answers
229 views

Hesitating as bluff

The contracting player leads a trump. As the next player I make an obvious hesitation before playing my singleton 10 of trumps. At the end of the hand my opponent, who did not call the director, ...