A 4 player trick-taking card game where opposing partners try to either take the number of tricks they bid or prevent their opponents from doing so. When asking questions on bidding or play, please specify scoring system (Rubber, Matchpoints, IMPS, ec.), Dealer, vulnerability for both sides, full ...

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165 views

What is a proper bidding sequence after a “weak 2” bid?

In the opening game of a rubber, I dealt and opened two diamonds (weak) with the following: (s) J3 (h) 54 (d) KJ7532 (c) A42. Partner responded two hearts. I passed with my two weak hearts, fearing a ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

bridge club alert rules internationally

Are the rules for alerting bids broadly similar at clubs throughout the world, or do they differ? Are bidding boxes used internationally? (My most specific interest is whether clubs in Switzerland ...
3
votes
2answers
157 views

Opener rebid priority

I'm playing/studying SAYC. So I know that game in major comes first then notrump then game in minors. When I open with 1 Club partner responds with 1 Spade -- I have 18PTS and 4 hearts and NT ...
3
votes
2answers
164 views

How to identify when to try a “Merriamac Coup” in bridge?

A "Merrimac Coup" in bridge usually refers to the "suicidal" lead of a king, in order to force out an opposing ace before the opponent is ready to use the ace as an entry. If that hand (usually dummy) ...
3
votes
1answer
137 views

Is it right to refrain from making a takeout double in borderline situations?

In today's bridge column, this example was given: North opened with one diamond. East doubled with (s) Qxx (h)AQxx (d) x (c) ATxxx. This double technically met my 14 point requirement (12 for high ...
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1answer
284 views

In Bridge, What is the Merit of Taking a “Double” Finesse?

Suppose I am declarer, and dummy has a "side" (non-trump) suit with AQx or AQxx, and I have xxx in my hand. I have been told NOT to finesse the Q (a 50-50 chance), except as a last resort, or late in ...
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3answers
100 views

Does the possibility of claiming tricks prevent the defense from profitting from declarer's errors?

Suppose, the declarer claims 12 tricks in a slam, but you have the opinion that declarer can make a mistake. Can you demand declarer to play it out, or does the tournament director decide how many ...
3
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2answers
159 views

How does one evaluate a hand responding to a “strong” two clubs?

When opener bids a "strong" two club, responder bids two diamonds (waiting), and the opener rebids his suit, e.g. two spades, the responder is now the "captain" of the partnership. That's because s/he ...
3
votes
1answer
158 views

Bridge: Usage of the stop card

The STOP card in bridge is used in order to help all players keep their rights, as far as thinking is concerned. However I have some questions. When do we have to use the STOP card. Should STOP be ...
3
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2answers
187 views

What is the “pause” rule for dummy play in tournament bridge?

My understanding is that in a bridge tournament, that the declarer must pause for some time (X seconds) after the dummy goes down, in order to study it, before playing to the first trick. What is ...
3
votes
2answers
429 views

Opening bids with no long suits

My partner and I play a strong NT and 5 card Majors. However, we're unsure how to open strong hands with no long suits. For example, how do we open a 4432 hand with 16-19 high card points or 20-22 ...
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2answers
280 views

Does one need to bid Stayman with a flat distribution?

This example is from a book. South opens 1NT (15-17) with: (s) AKx (h) JTxx (d) Kxx (c) Axx. North has (s) Qxx (h)Axxx (d) Axx (c) xxx and goes to 3NT. The author (George Coffin) says that North ...
3
votes
1answer
435 views

Confused with Bidding in Contract Bridge

I'm building an Android game based on Contract Bridge, where 4 players will be playing simultaneously once they are connected with the Game Server. I have no prior experience of playing any card ...
3
votes
2answers
379 views

When might a Standard American bidder “bend” the five card major rule?

"Five card majors" is the foundation of the Standard American system. Yet rules are made to be broken under special circumstances. My understanding is that some bidders will adhere to "five card ...
3
votes
1answer
112 views

What Other Bidding Approaches Are There?

My parents taught me how to play bridge. They grew up in the 1970s when Precision Club was popular and they taught me how to play strong club. When I grew up, SAYC and 2/1 were beaten into me. Now, I ...
3
votes
2answers
922 views

In bridge, what opening bid(s) should be made with a high card point in “no man's land”?

Recently, I was dealt a hand with a high card point and distribution too strong to open 1 NT but not enough to bid 2 of a suit, i.e. in "no man's land". Any advice you can provide about how I should ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

What are ways to “read” the shape of your opponents' hands early on?

Toward the end, the shape of opponents' hands can be read by "counting" (playing out two or three suits and inferring the shape of the remaining one(s)). In the beginning, one looks for more subtle ...
3
votes
2answers
201 views

In Bridge, Is it Sometimes Good to Lead an Opponent's Suit on Defense?

I was "West," that is, the opening leader. My left and right hand opponents had alternated diamond and spade bids, neither supporting the other, suggesting something like 6-1 misfits in both suits ...
3
votes
2answers
161 views

Grand slam bidding with high card points hand

What is my opening bid with a 24 high card point hand, so that I don't get 3 passes and end up short of slam? AKQJx AKx Ax KQJ, I think. One year players. So rare to see this hand. Partner had 11 ...
3
votes
2answers
257 views

In bridge, if a 1 NT bidder is doubled, is it right to “redouble for rescue?”

Suppose South opens with 1 NT (15-17). After two passes, East doubles, showing possession of most of the remaining 23-25 high card points not held by South. 1NT P P Dbl South has a flat 4-3-3-3 ...
3
votes
1answer
256 views

In bridge, how do you tell when to use holdup versus blocking plays?

You are the declarer at a 3NT contract (1NT, 3NT, no opposing bids). West leads what appears to be a five card suit, and you have Axx in dummy. Your main concern is that East can get the setting ...
3
votes
0answers
122 views

Richard Pavliceks mystery

Richard Pavlicek made a great bridge site. Here http://www.rpbridge.net/7f55.htm The mystery is this: Is there a bridge hand where North/South can make a grandslam in any suit, but not even ...
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votes
6answers
5k views

In Bridge, what are “proper” responses to a “strong” 2 club bid?

Bidding Standard American, and opening a "strong" two clubs (typically 22 HCPs and a six card suit), I like to hear responses of 2 diamonds (0-8 points, no more than game interest), or 2NT (9+ plus ...
2
votes
2answers
473 views

Are there “established” systems where “Five Card Majors” isn't a strict rule?

In "Standard American," I must open a major with 65432 while refraining from opening a major with AKQJ. IMHO, there are five card majors that are too weak to be opened and there four card majors that ...
2
votes
3answers
107 views

Bridge: Opening lead from AK - why K instead of A

Many books, including Goren, recommend leading K from both a AK (or AKQ) and also a KQ. Why an ambiguous lead like this? Why not A from AK and K from KQ? Consider a trump contract. Partner ...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

In bridge, should a defender play differently with most, about half, or few of the partnership's points?

This example is from Victor Mollo's "Test Your Defense, Where the Points are Won." You are East. The bidding has been 1NT pass 3NT pass. West leads what looks to be the fourth highest spade. You ...
2
votes
4answers
139 views

Can you raise a one bid with only two “filler” honors in a suit?

Suppose partner bids one of a (five card) major. Normally you need three of the suit to raise. But expert Marty Bergen has opined that if your suit has four honors, you can bid it as if were one card ...
2
votes
3answers
174 views

Is there a reasonable suit preference signal on this lead?

The contract is 3 NT, and the bidding has been a straightforward, 1NT, pass, 3NT, all pass. West leads the king of diamonds from AKTxx. The defenders have agreed that this means three honors, ...
2
votes
2answers
215 views

Leading from the wrong (nondummy) hand in bridge

While playing bridge you were supposed to lead from the dummy's hand, but you pulled a card from your hand by mistake. After putting it back in your hand, do you have to play the same suit when you ...
2
votes
2answers
251 views

Are there times NOT to bid 1NT with 15 high card points and a balanced hand?

This refers to a strong (15-17) 1NT with hand shapes of 4-3-3-3, 4-4-3-2, or 5-3-3-2. With "flat" hand like (s) Kxx (h) Kxx (d) KJx (c) KQxx, I would refrain from bidding 1NT, after deducting one ...
2
votes
3answers
373 views

Responding to a simple overcall (SAYC)

LHO opened with 1C – Partner overcalled with 1S – (I have 6 pts, 4 Spades) → Do I respond with 2S? P.S. rho pass. EDIT : what my gripe with this is, that according to textbooks, you respond to ...
2
votes
4answers
251 views

In bridge, does it make sense to “tighten” or 'loosen" up on bidding depending on vulnerability?

For instance, the minimum standard seems to be about 12 points to open with a five card suit, or 13 points with a four card minor. That makes sense with equal vulnerability (both vulnerable or both ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

In bridge, are the two “equal vulnerabilities” basically equal?

To me, "equal vulnerability" means both sides vulnerable or both not. In sacrificing against a major suit game, "down two" means -500 when vulnerable versus -300 when not. This compares against ...
2
votes
3answers
370 views

When should a bridge defender return the second, rather than fourth highest card in suit?

Against a bidding sequence of 1NT, 3NT, partner, West, opens with what looks like the fourth highest of a suit. Dummy goes down with two small cards in the suit. I have four to the king in the suit, ...
2
votes
2answers
69 views

What are bidding sequences in which the responder is likely to be the “captain” of the partnership?

I can think of two: The first one is when the opener bids no trump. Then the responder knows that the opener has a "balanced" hand, and 15-17 high card points for 1NT, 20-21 for 2NT, etc. Another ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

Bridge the 3 card 7 club bid

chair one opened 1 spade I was chair two and said 3 clubs, saying , I have 7 clubs and a outside ace and not 13 pts to open? She says I would have to open 4 clubs for it to mean that, Who's right, of ...
2
votes
1answer
105 views

In SAYC, what does doubling a 2-level weak jump overcall mean?

In SAYC, what does doubling a 2-level weak jump overcall mean? For example, the bidding sequence: 1♣ - 2♠ - double. Is it a negative double, a penalty double, a show of spade control, or something ...
2
votes
3answers
310 views

In bridge, how much support do you need to raise a responder?

Suppose I bid one of a (short) minor. Partner responds one of a major (one-over-one), showing at least four cards in the suit. What do I need to raise his major to two? Some books say I need four ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

Origin of Puppet Stayman

There are many variations, but I presume there was an initial original version of puppet stayman. Does anyone know who came up with it, and why it is named as such? (A google search has been ...
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votes
4answers
282 views

Should I respond to 1 NT in a suit or NT holding 17 HCP and a void?

My partner opened a "strong" one NT. I am holding: ♠ void ♥ KJxx ♦ AKQxxx ♣ KJx What should I bid?
2
votes
3answers
200 views

How do you decide which way to finesse for an ace?

This is from the New York Post, which is to say that it is a "problem." You are declarer (South) in a 3 no trump contract. You get a "friendly" lead in a suit where you have three winners (two in ...
2
votes
1answer
181 views

Has the value of a five-card suit in no trump contracts been demonstrated?

Going through old bridge books (by e.g., George Coffin), I was struck by the fact that some 3NT contracts made easily with "only" 24-25 and a good five card suit, while if both declarer and dummy had ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Playing duplicate bridge against players from some event

I am organizing a Bridge club in my workplace and I want it to be Duplicate Bridge one, but currently sometimes we don't get 8 people to join the meeting (I hope, in the future the club will grow). ...
2
votes
2answers
132 views

Cold contract in bridge

A cold contract usually means that a contract, which makes on most reasonable lines, as the cards lie. You hear people say, "He managed to find a line to go down in a cold contract". (Note: the ...
2
votes
3answers
454 views

Should I Use A “Negative Double” Over a Possible “Short Club” Bid And Overcall in Bridge?

Playing Standard American, partner opened 1 club. Right hand opponent overcalled 1 spade. I raised to 2 clubs with: ♠xx ♥Axxx ♦JTxx ♣Qxx Everyone passed. Partner had 13 points and a "short" three ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Claiming honours in rubber bridge

When playing rubber bridge, can the declarer still claim after the hand is over but the next hand has not been dealt?
2
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3answers
93 views

Double after a pre-empt?

A bridge player opens with a pre-emptive bid of 3 or 4 of a suit and the opponent doubles. Is this bid assumed to be for take out?
2
votes
1answer
169 views

Can one show that a majority of bridge hands could have been successfully defended?

In noting the importance of defense in overall bridge scores, a bridge teacher opined that half or more contracts were either defeated or could have been. I was wondering if available records of the ...
2
votes
2answers
221 views

Different kinds of “two direction” finesses in bridge?

I once read in a book about a "backward" finesse. You, declarer, have AJ9, and dummy has Kxx. Ordinarily, you would finesse twice from dummy toward AJ9. Except that your left hand opponent has ...
2
votes
1answer
610 views

Can “SWOT” analysis be useful in bridge

SWOT stands for (an analysis of) strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats. There are four "fields" and yes, four suits. Here's an example from this deal, which came up in today's New York Post. ...