A 4 player trick-taking card game where opposing partners try to either take the number of tricks they bid or prevent their opponents from doing so.

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What is the meaning of “count your losers” at no trump, and “count your winners” for a trump contract?

Are no trump bidders taught to "count your losers" because their 25-26 points represents enough material for nine tricks so that they should "play not to lose" (i.e. to prevent their opponents from ...
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132 views

In bridge, should you be more careful with takeout doubles over one spade?

With a hand like (s) Axxx (h) KQxx (d) Kxxx (c) x, I would gladly make a takeout double over one club. That's because my partner would have a choice of three suits to bid at the one level. Change the ...
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108 views

In bridge, should East consider “overtaking” his partner's lead if able?

One example is if West leads a Q (top of a sequence) against a NT contract, and East plays K from Kx to unblock. If allowed to hold the trick, East would lead back the x. My understanding is that ...
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105 views

Which way to capture a queen?

This is a problem from today's New York Post. You (South) are in a stretchy major suit contract with only 22 high card points. You have four top tricks outside the trump suit, and have just won a ...
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101 views

When might a Standard American bidder “bend” the five card major rule?

"Five card majors" is the foundation of the Standard American system. Yet rules are made to be broken under special circumstances. My understanding is that some bidders will adhere to "five card ...
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63 views

In bridge, does it make sense to “shade” one's bidding standards with a part score?

For instance, most players today bid five card majors, because that's (probably) the best way to get to a major suit game of ten tricks. But suppose my team has a part score of 40. That means that ...
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95 views

Interpreting bidding by partners

RHO: 1C --> LHO: 1S --> RHO: 2D Does this mean 4-4 in clubs/diamonds, or 5-4 in clubs diamonds. Is it a reverse? (e.g.18+ pts?). Assuming opponents play SAYC.
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Bridge: Matchpoints vs IMPs: Different game?

There are at least two main types of tournament scoring: matchpoints (MPs) and IMPs. It is often said that these two are "different" games, claiming that the strategy you use is completely different. ...
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315 views

What to bid in this situation (xx-Kx-AQTxx-AQxx, 1D-1S-2C-2D…)? (System: Simple SAYC)

I open 1D -- Partner 1S -- I bid 2C (my holding was xx-Kx-AQTxx-AQxx) -- Partner bids 2D -- What do I bid, and why? (since I have to respond when partner keeps changing suit and no NT has been yet ...
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In bridge, does a declarer “need to” locate all 52 cards during the play of a trump contract?

This was recommended by author Terence Reese (and several members of the site). But I was taught differently, at least as declarer. That is, I was taught to count "trumps and honors." So, if you are ...
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Is A Good time Make a “Penalty” Double When Your Defensive Tricks Exceed Your “Allowance”?

Most contracts are predicated on the supposition that the defenders will win some tricks. If game can be made with "26 points and eight trumps," this leaves 14 points and five trumps to the defenders ...
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Analyzing bidding sequence

My left opponent opened 1S - Right-side opponent responded 2H (I understood: 11+, 4+ card heart suit, shortness in spades) - L.O. responded 2S - R.O. responded 3D (has shortness of spades). R.O. : 4 ...