A 4 player trick-taking card game where opposing partners try to either take the number of tricks they bid or prevent their opponents from doing so. When asking questions on bidding or play, please specify scoring system (Rubber, Matchpoints, IMPS, ec.), Dealer, vulnerability for both sides, full ...

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10
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5answers
3k views

When will playing Rubber Bridge vs. Duplicate Bridge affect your decisions?

In Rubber Bridge, you are trying to get more points than your opponents. In Duplicate Bridge, you are trying to get more points than the other people playing the same hand later on do. For a while I ...
2
votes
2answers
568 views

Are there “established” systems where “Five Card Majors” isn't a strict rule?

In "Standard American," I must open a major with 65432 while refraining from opening a major with AKQJ. IMHO, there are five card majors that are too weak to be opened and there four card majors that ...
7
votes
4answers
715 views

How can I practice my opening leads in bridge?

After playing bridge for several months, I feel my declarer play and bidding have improved to a beginner-intermediate level. However, I think my skill at making an opening lead is that of a novice at ...
3
votes
2answers
168 views

Opener rebid priority

I'm playing/studying SAYC. So I know that game in major comes first then notrump then game in minors. When I open with 1 Club partner responds with 1 Spade -- I have 18PTS and 4 hearts and NT ...
4
votes
3answers
328 views

Bridge bidding - how do I decide whether or not to bid 1NT with weakness in a particular suit?

If I'm inclined to bid NT with 15-17 points, but am weak in one suit, how weak can I be, and still bid 1NT, as opposed to bidding 1 club, to find out if my partner can show strength e.g. a stopper in ...
9
votes
2answers
212 views

Question on ethics or rules

I would very much like to know the correct ethical procedure for the following play. Hearts are trump. West led a small club North played a small club East played a small spade I as South played a ...
4
votes
1answer
93 views

In bridge, are “sequences” more valuable than non-sequences of similar point count?

In backgammon, for instance, sequences of "points" are more valuable than the same number of points out of sequence. That is the 6-5, or 6-5-4 points, are more valuable than the 6-4, or 6-4-2 points ...
4
votes
1answer
287 views

Is a “drop-finesse” better than a simple “drop” play with a nine card suit in bridge?

Regarding finesses for a missing queen in a key (e.g. trump suit), there is a proverb of "eight ever [always] nine never." Instead, one is supposed to play for a drop. (This, and most other proverbs ...
2
votes
2answers
107 views

In bridge, should a defender play differently with most, about half, or few of the partnership's points?

This example is from Victor Mollo's "Test Your Defense, Where the Points are Won." You are East. The bidding has been 1NT pass 3NT pass. West leads what looks to be the fourth highest spade. You hold:...
6
votes
3answers
454 views

In bridge, can “good” players get away with bidding “light”?

The conventional wisdom is that it takes 26 points to make a game. But authors such as Terence Reese have written compendiums of how they made games with 23-25 points by "outplaying" the defense; ...
2
votes
2answers
246 views

Different kinds of “two direction” finesses in bridge?

I once read in a book about a "backward" finesse. You, declarer, have AJ9, and dummy has Kxx. Ordinarily, you would finesse twice from dummy toward AJ9. Except that your left hand opponent has ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

In Bridge, Why Do People Use “Transfer Bids” Over 1 NT?

Over 1NT, some people bid two diamonds to say they have five hearts, and two hearts to say they have five spades. The 1NT person bids the desired suit, completing the transfer. Apparently the idea is ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

What Are The Key Features Of The “Fantunes” Bidding System?

Zia Mahmood's Bridge column for the Guardian newspaper today tells of two players with world titles to their names, Fulvio Fantoni and Claudio Nunes, who apparently have an intriguing bidding system: ...
4
votes
1answer
438 views

In bridge, what are exceptions to “third hand high?”

You are sitting "East" (with dummy to your right), and your partner West leads a low (presumably fourth best) card in a suit against a 3 no trump contract. When dummy plays low from "nothing," and you ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

In Bridge, Can I Ask About Previously Played Cards to the Current Trick?

In Bridge, one is allowed to look at the four cards played to the last trick (if the next round hasn't started). Can I similarly ask about cards played to the current trick? I was sitting at East, ...
3
votes
1answer
119 views

What are ways to “read” the shape of your opponents' hands early on?

Toward the end, the shape of opponents' hands can be read by "counting" (playing out two or three suits and inferring the shape of the remaining one(s)). In the beginning, one looks for more subtle ...
7
votes
2answers
16k views

What is the penalty for failing to follow suit?

Assume the mistake is unintentional, what course of action should be taken when this occurs and is discovered? If the person discovers themselves that they earlier made the mistake, is the penalty ...
14
votes
2answers
309 views

Hesitating as bluff

The contracting player leads a trump. As the next player I make an obvious hesitation before playing my singleton 10 of trumps. At the end of the hand my opponent, who did not call the director, ...
8
votes
2answers
697 views

In bridge, what are some exceptions to “second hand low?”

Most beginners are taught to play "second hand low." That is, play a low card if one is led to them, to give the partner a chance to take the trick. This is particularly to avoid situations where ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

Which way to capture a queen?

This is a problem from today's New York Post. You (South) are in a stretchy major suit contract with only 22 high card points. You have four top tricks outside the trump suit, and have just won a ...
10
votes
2answers
259 views

Can't understand the meaning of 'heart finesse'

What does the phrase heart finesse mean? It appears to be a card term: http://www.confsudbridge.org/hits/brbm0014i.aspx Think about it a little: if the heart finesse was necessary to the ...
1
vote
3answers
195 views

Are there times to pre-empt with a “strong” six trumps in bridge?

Suppose you have something like AQJxxx of clubs (and no other values). If it were any other suit than clubs, I'd open with a with a "weak two" bid. But two clubs is the STRONG two bid. Meaning that ...
3
votes
1answer
512 views

Confused with Bidding in Contract Bridge

I'm building an Android game based on Contract Bridge, where 4 players will be playing simultaneously once they are connected with the Game Server. I have no prior experience of playing any card game,...
5
votes
3answers
662 views

In bridge, are there some 13 point hands that should not be opened?

Suppose you have: (s) Jx (h)KQxx (d) KJxx (c) Kxx. That's 13 points, by the usual count. But I can think of at least two things wrong with it. First, there are no aces, meaning that the hand has ...
2
votes
1answer
176 views

In bridge, is an “uppercut” a special case of a “forcing game?”

In a standard forcing game, you the defender, may have four (or more) trumps, and ypu lead a long suit in which declarer is void in order to force him to ruff, thereby shortening his trumps to your ...
3
votes
3answers
713 views

Can a takeout doubler pass a redoubled contract?

South opened one diamond. West doubled for takeout with the following hand: s) Axxx (H) Kxx (D) Kxx (C) Qxx North redoubled. This took me (East) off the hook with something like s) xxx (H) xxx (D) ...
7
votes
2answers
391 views

What is the purpose of “underruffing” in bridge?

Sometimes declarer will lead a long suit from one hand, for a "ruffing finesse" in order to ruff with a void in the other. If the intervening opponent ruffs with say, the 9, the declarer might "...
2
votes
1answer
133 views

In Bridge, should a defender “encourage” with a "stranded honor?

In the example in Today's New York Post, the bidding went: S 1 spade, N 2 clubs, S 2 NT, N3 spades, S 4 Spades (East and West passed throughout). West led the 9 of hearts, which as between these ...
2
votes
1answer
724 views

Can “SWOT” analysis be useful in bridge

SWOT stands for (an analysis of) strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats. There are four "fields" and yes, four suits. Here's an example from this deal, which came up in today's New York Post. ...
9
votes
4answers
3k views

Do good bridge players memorize all cards played?

Certainly, they track the quantity of each suit and the high value cards, but I'm curious if good bridge players also remember, say, whether someone ducked the ace using a 7 of spades vs a 6 of spades....
1
vote
2answers
308 views

What Are the Requirements for a “Jump” Bid Opposite a Takeout Double in Bridge?

My left hand opponent opened one diamond. Partner doubled. Right hand opponent passed. I was sitting in fourth seat with eight points, and something like (s) KJxxx (h) Jxx (d) xx (c) Kxx. I "jumped"...
3
votes
1answer
152 views

Is it right to refrain from making a takeout double in borderline situations?

In today's bridge column, this example was given: North opened with one diamond. East doubled with (s) Qxx (h)AQxx (d) x (c) ATxxx. This double technically met my 14 point requirement (12 for high ...
6
votes
2answers
366 views

Doubleton Negating High-Card Points

I play bridge casually and mostly have learned from other players (and occasionally from online resources). While playing recently another player suggested that I was counting my hand's points ...
6
votes
1answer
205 views

Is it legitimate/ethical to treat the same bid from different people in different ways?

I play in a bridge "round robin" using Chicago scoring, with three other people. Call them, A, B, and C, with three different styles. A will open, say one spade with as few as ten high card points (...
5
votes
2answers
917 views

In Bridge, Is “ruffing” a good enough reason to postpone drawing trumps?

Most bridge teachers (and books) teach players to draw trumps at the first possible opportunity. The reason is that you don't want your opponents to take tricks with low trumps. (If they have the A, ...
16
votes
4answers
2k views

Is bidding in contract bridge just a matter of applying a set of rules?

Some years ago I tried to learn to play contract bridge with some friends and I never really understood the philosophy (for want of a better word) of bidding. It seemed as if we just had to learn a ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Is it better to learn to play bridge by reading about it, or just playing?

I'm an avid card player, and I have a particular love for trick-taking games (above all, Hearts and Spades). I've wanted to learn to play bridge for a long time, and I've bought two different books on ...
2
votes
3answers
514 views

Should I Use A “Negative Double” Over a Possible “Short Club” Bid And Overcall in Bridge?

Playing Standard American, partner opened 1 club. Right hand opponent overcalled 1 spade. I raised to 2 clubs with: ♠xx ♥Axxx ♦JTxx ♣Qxx Everyone passed. Partner had 13 points and a "short" three ...
3
votes
2answers
382 views

In Bridge, Is There A Way To Shorten “Reaction Time” For “Real Time” Play

I like to solve bridge problems in newspapers. When I do this, I often get the correct answer, or at least come "within sight" (e.g. get the key idea but "muff" the sequence). This process typically ...
5
votes
1answer
359 views

What is “Playing For Top or Bottom” In Bridge?

Apparently it relates to duplicate bridge. Initially, I thought it meant playing the hand in a risky way to score overtricks, and taking the chance of sacrificing a potential game. But then someone ...
8
votes
8answers
4k views

Getting started with trick-taking games (whist, euchre, bridge, pinochle, etc.) [closed]

I've heard there are a lot of different trick-taking games out there, such as whist, bridge, euchre, pinochle, oh hell, hearts etc. I've heard a lot of good things about these games, but have very ...
3
votes
2answers
215 views

In Bridge, Is it Sometimes Good to Lead an Opponent's Suit on Defense?

I was "West," that is, the opening leader. My left and right hand opponents had alternated diamond and spade bids, neither supporting the other, suggesting something like 6-1 misfits in both suits (...
6
votes
1answer
604 views

How do I Detect/Defend Against an Endplay In Bridge?

When I see declarer draw trumps, and then start to "eliminate" (ruff out) one or more plain suits, my biggest fear as a defender is of an end play. That is, the declarer will put me on lead because I'...
5
votes
3answers
740 views

In contract bridge, what are bonus points for?

I am a beginner and could not find out the application or the use of those bonus points above the line in contract(rubber) bridge. If the winner in a contract bridge is the pair that first achieves 2 ...
4
votes
1answer
158 views

In Bridge, How do I Differentiate Between My Partner's Signals on Defense?

On defense, there are attitude, suit preference, and count signals. My guess is that the play to the first trick would represent an "attitude" signal for a suit. Beyond that, how do I differentiate ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Why Do People “Pre-empt” With Seven Of A Suit In Bridge?

One advantage of a "pre-empt" is quite clear: You take two levels of bidding away from your opponents with a "three" bid. But could that be cutting off your nose to spite your face? Recently, I had ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

What Crazy Bridge Bidding Systems Actually Work In Practice?

There's been a lot of talk about bridge bidding in these parts lately. A lot of people like to play "straight down the line", to the point where they're mortally offended when you suggest something "...
1
vote
2answers
339 views

Does a Takeout Double Apply to a “Passed” Partner?

Using Standard American my left hand opponent bid one heart. Partner passed. Right hand opponent raised to two hearts. I was in the "balancing" (fourth) seat and held: (s) Axxx (h) x (d) KJxx (c) ...
10
votes
2answers
377 views

In Bridge Play, What is Meant by “Combining Your Chances?”

I was in a NT contract. After the initial rounds of play, the last few (visible) cards were something like these in two suits (call them spades and hearts): dummy: spades KJx Hearts xxx Me: Spades ...
1
vote
2answers
459 views

Why Is Two Clubs the Preferred “Strong Two” In Bridge?

I'd prefer to use two spades myself. And save two clubs for a "weak two." Moreover, I was taught that "higher bids mean higher points" (all other things being equal). Two spades is the highest suit ...