A 4 player trick-taking card game where opposing partners try to either take the number of tricks they bid or prevent their opponents from doing so.

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11
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2answers
467 views

Is there a good casual online place to practice/learn bridge?

I know that Pogo.com (which powers Yahoo Games) has a long running online bridge game and that there are a handful of places for serious tournament/MasterPoint level bridge players online (though most ...
13
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4answers
1k views

Why are beginning to intermediate bridge players told to delay learning how to bid certain types of unusual hands?

When learning modern bidding (Standard American 5 card majors in my case), I noticed that the system's bidding techniques and common conventions described good ways of getting to a reasonable contract ...
7
votes
3answers
190 views

Can one ask for a “time out” to study the hand in bridge?

"West" (the opening leader) has to lead before seeing the dummy. Both declarer (South) and partner (East) ought to study the dummy before playing. But often they do not. Suppose South wins the trick, ...
6
votes
2answers
212 views

In Bridge, what is the punishment for misclaiming tricks?

Down to the last two rounds in rubber bridge. Declarer claims remaining tricks only to discover that he has miscounted. He claims the two tricks with Q-10; however, opponent holds the J and ...
4
votes
3answers
401 views

In bridge, are there some 13 point hands that should not be opened?

Suppose you have: (s) Jx (h)KQxx (d) KJxx (c) Kxx. That's 13 points, by the usual count. But I can think of at least two things wrong with it. First, there are no aces, meaning that the hand has ...
2
votes
2answers
438 views

Are there “established” systems where “Five Card Majors” isn't a strict rule?

In "Standard American," I must open a major with 65432 while refraining from opening a major with AKQJ. IMHO, there are five card majors that are too weak to be opened and there four card majors that ...
30
votes
9answers
2k views

Why is the strong 1NT so prevalent in Bridge?

Bridge is widely considered to be the queen of card games on both sides of the Atlantic. However, there's one huge difference between the way that (most) Americans and (most) Britons play. In ...
2
votes
2answers
144 views

How do you decide which way to finesse for an ace?

This is from the New York Post, which is to say that it is a "problem." You are declarer (South) in a 3 no trump contract. You get a "friendly" lead in a suit where you have three winners (two in ...
10
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2answers
517 views

In bridge which bids need alerting?

When playing bridge which bids need to be pointed out/alerted?
9
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2answers
253 views

In Bridge Play, What is Meant by “Combining Your Chances?”

I was in a NT contract. After the initial rounds of play, the last few (visible) cards were something like these in two suits (call them spades and hearts): dummy: spades KJx Hearts xxx Me: Spades ...
7
votes
8answers
2k views

Getting started with trick-taking games (whist, euchre, bridge, pinochle, etc.) [closed]

I've heard there are a lot of different trick-taking games out there, such as whist, bridge, euchre, pinochle, oh hell, hearts etc. I've heard a lot of good things about these games, but have very ...
5
votes
1answer
803 views

What is (Larry Cohen's) the “Law of Total Tricks” In Bridge?

Based on my (imperfect) understanding of the "law," it means that my partnership should bid up to the same level as the number of trumps. For instance, with four trumps over my partner's five card ...
4
votes
3answers
519 views

Is Duplicate Bridge (standard Matchpoints) a game of pure skill?

I'm inclined to say "no" because because each of the following could be considered lucky: A finesse can be tried 2 different ways and your partnership selects the one that works You play a routine, ...
4
votes
8answers
2k views

How should hands that are EXTREMELY strong in one suit (10+ cards) be bid?

I'm a bit of a bridge noob, but I'm kind of puzzled about this. Say I have a hand that is ridiculously strong in one suit, say at least 10 cards with all 4 honors (I'll use spades for the example ...
3
votes
1answer
128 views

Is it right to refrain from making a takeout double in borderline situations?

In today's bridge column, this example was given: North opened with one diamond. East doubled with (s) Qxx (h)AQxx (d) x (c) ATxxx. This double technically met my 14 point requirement (12 for high ...
3
votes
2answers
294 views

In Bridge, Is There A Way To Shorten “Reaction Time” For “Real Time” Play

I like to solve bridge problems in newspapers. When I do this, I often get the correct answer, or at least come "within sight" (e.g. get the key idea but "muff" the sequence). This process typically ...
3
votes
5answers
391 views

In Bridge, Do You Count Defensive Points In the Opponents' Suit When Making a Takeout Double?

Left hand opponent opened 1 heart. Partner doubled for takeout. Right hand opponent passed. I "had to" bid 2 clubs with something like (S) xxx (H) xx (D) Jxxx (C) Jxxx. We were doubled for penalties, ...
2
votes
3answers
208 views

In bridge, do people go through cycles of under- and -over bidding?

In the board game Go, there are two basic styles, high and low. "High" is all the rage for about ten years, until people have forgotten how to play "low." Then "low" gets "rediscovered," and people ...
1
vote
1answer
149 views

Did a bridge column make errors in discussing a hand?

This is from yesterday's New York Post. North-South are playing at four spades. Vulnerable, they had bid 1 spade, 2 spades, 4 spades, no opposing bids. Here's the hand: North (s) AQ9 ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

In bridge, does it make sense to “shade” one's bidding standards with a part score?

For instance, most players today bid five card majors, because that's (probably) the best way to get to a major suit game of ten tricks. But suppose my team has a part score of 40. That means that ...