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14

Statistically, I think the Axis get the short end. I tried finding some web site specifically discussing stats on various countries, but came up empty, so you'll have to settle for qualitative data from me at least. I havn't played this game in years, but I always like playing Russia. I would say Russia is the best in terms of fun to play, but it's not ...


13

Answering the question with AAMC bid statistics Others have explained why the Axis have a significant disadvantage in the 2nd Edition rules. I'll attempt to provide hard evidence and quantify this advantage. The popular play-by-email (PBEM) site Axis and Allies Members Club (which I have no affiliation with and which I hadn't logged onto in years until I ...


12

It looks as if your friend has read too much history and not enough of the rulebook. Russia did have a de facto truce with the Japanese, and I'm sure Stalin would have loved it if the US and Japan had pounded each other into shreds while the Red Army was busy. But Stalin, whatever else he may have been, was a good game player: the troops he transferred ...


10

I think there are three basic strategies for the UK: Focus on India - with this approach, the UK cedes Africa to Germany. On the first turn, the UK builds a factory in India and uses its transport to move its two troops in Egypt to India, as well as the Egyptian tank and Syrian infantry into Persia (to move into India next turn). The fighters that start in ...


9

Ok, so I asked a question over at math.stackexchange.com to get some advise on how to analyze the various weapon development options (see How to analyze risk vs. reward for spending on research and development work). Mike Spivey suggested using a decision tree, which I had some familiarity with from past classes in probability and statistics. In short, the ...


9

My suggestion is very similar to Scott's, but with subtle variations to make it less burdensome to play in person. This isn't a rule, just a suggestion: Play with someone you trust. There's going to be hidden information, and if you think the other player is going to cheat you're going to be paranoid about looking for malfeasance and not have fun. Two ...


8

Have the US send over fighters and bombers to Russia as soon as possible. This is the fastest way of reinforcing the front, as russia is able to 'confiscate' allied units in their ground. Have England concentrate mostly on keeping the seas clean early in the game.


8

Check out the Axis & Allies Combat Simulator/Calculator. You can choose which variant of the game you're playing (Original, Revised Edition, etc.), how many simulations to run, and a number of other options. (There's even a iPhone and Android versions!) The combat simulator then tells you the average IPC loss for both sides and the average winning ...


7

At the start of the game, the Allies have a significant advantage over the Axis due a variety of reasons, including: Their combined economic power The fact that there are three Allies playing against two Axis US's economic strength and the fact that its richest territories are virtually safe from attack due to their distance from the European and Asian ...


6

At a basic level, I weigh the 3 IPC payment and the opportunity cost of the units I used to invade it against the benefit to be gained. That's pretty generic so some examples might help: As Japan, I often find myself invading Panama in the mid- to late-game because my navy has nothing else useful to do. If America doesn't have any tanks in Western US, ...


5

At the tactical level, the AI for A&A is a minmax on a zero-sum game tree with some fuzziness. We have a structure that represents game state (board and pieces), the relative score of each player for that state (value of troops and land income), and a set of transitions (i.e. moves) from that state to new states. Transitions can weighted by probability ...


5

The problem with the Kwabang attack is it can give the UK a decent foothold in Asia, as well as denying Japan some early IPC, and it really screws with Japan's starting strategies. Part of me wants to say, "Just ignore Kwangtung, go after Hawaii, and start grinding out transports and armor turn 2 for a mainland attack", but I think the Kwangtung attack ...


5

The dynamics of the game are based on the following: 1) In "real life," Germany would have beaten Britain and Russia if the latter two did not receive American help. 2) Overwhelming American power (almost that of Britain, Germany and Russia put together) meant that the Allies would be heavy favorites once America joined the war. 3) In the game, America has a ...


5

Beef up the front. Move in all units from Caucasus to Ukraine, and all armor divisions from the East into Belarussia. Put aeroplanes, infantry, artillery, and maybe even AA guns in Belarussia, some in Leningrad, and a small force in Archangel. Thus the Germans may attack the front and be anihalated, while you just bring up more inf. Then began the long march ...


5

Axis & Allies Chess Rules Okay, I finally found the link to the website with the original A&A Chess rules. To be honest I didn't play this variant much, but it seemed apropos to the original post about luckless games so I mentioned it. From my limited experience I can concur with the inventor's comments: although it looks identical to normal A&A ...


5

Sounds like an interesting variant that would be much more fun to play online rather than in person, since in person necessitates the need of a mediator and requires the two players to be physically separated so as not to see the other's board. Although I have a slight suggestion - rather than having all enemy territories as unknowns, each side should see ...


5

Would you try to conclude such an agreement with the other party if you were playing Japan? Russia? If I was playing Japan, no, I'd not want such an agreement. If I was Russia, then yes. Russia's sole aim in the early game is to build up a wall of infantry in Karelia to stop Germany from expanding her borders and to buy time until her allies can start ...


5

In answer to your subquestion of "why does it make sense to leave one infantry in a territory you're retreating from?" The core of the analysis around this hinges on the assumption that you will be trading back and forth over the contested territory with small numbers of units- that you have a large, constantly growing stack in A, your opponent has a large, ...


5

The rulebook clearly covers this situation. On page 17 under Step 8: Capture Territory If you win a combat as the attacker in a territory, and you have one or more surviving land units there, you take control of it. Sea units cannot take control of a territory.... Air units can never capture a territory.


5

No, you cannot use industrial complexes you captured or purchased this turn. You must have missed it, top of page 22. Phase 5: Mobilize New Units Move the newly purchased units from the mobilization zone on the game board to eligible spaces you have controlled since the start of your turn, with the following exceptions (below). You cannot use ...


5

Here's the snippet of map we're talking about: There are three spaces of interest here: England (a land zone) The water surrounding England (a sea zone) Western Europe (a land zone) These are three separate spaces, and must be passed through in turn; Western Europe is not adjacent to England. You can't just jump from Western Europe to England, you ...


4

Take India / Fortress Manchuria My response to this strategy is based on the 2nd edition map and is fairly simple. Move everything from Burma into India. This move have two purposes: first, it ensures you can hold India from a 2 inf + 1 fighter counter attack from Sinkiang and prevent the UK Indian factory; second, it leaves Burma enticingly open--you ...


4

I'm not sure the best way to answer this question, but I'm going to propose a running list starting with A&A 2nd edition as the baseline and then listing each progressive revision below it with all the changes from the previous version--just like software release notes. Since I don't own all the versions I'm making this answer a community wiki. Please ...


4

Moderate Difficulty I assume you're talking about A&A Revised or perhaps the 50th edition rules. I mention this because both are slightly more complicated in terms of rules than now obsolete 2nd edition (i.e. the new editions have more units and more special rules). That said, the following observations should apply across all versions, with the newer ...


4

Pacific Dominance For each turn that Japan controls all of the Pacific islands at the end of a full turn they are rewarded with a free transport or submarine to be placed at a factory of their choice at the start of their turn. (This would require Japanese control of Hawaii, Midway, Australia, and New Zealand.) Germans in the Atlantic Similar to the Sink ...


4

I can't imagine an instance where a US factory in Brazil makes much sense. Let's look at the supposed advantages one by one: It can produce THREE units per turn - Yes, but the troops are not in a strategic position. The only territories to which you could move the units and not move your transports out the way is to: French West Africa; French Equatorial ...


4

What Is the Preferred Strategy For the US in Axis and Allies? You answered your own question - the simple "shuck-shuck" strategy devised by Don Rae. The reason it works is because infantry are cheap and defend at 2, but only attack at 1. Therefore you can build an impenetrable infantry force that can withstand a large German offensive push and keep ...


4

Over at this question about A&A variants I suggesting changing heavy bombers such that each bomber is worth two dice, choose the higher value. For attacking this means the probability of successful attack increases 33 percent: from 0.67 (4/6) to 0.89 (1 - 2/6^2). For strategic bombing the expected value of IPCs would goes up by 28 percent. So my rule ...


4

If "good" players don't like factories and intermediate players do, are factories necessary to the game? I'd classify myself an intermediate player and would say that the only country that really has any business building factories is Japan, and then not until the late game. The most common early game factory builds are usually mistakes, at least when ...



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