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1

You played the right way. Basically, the turn continues until 1) all the defending forces are destroyed, or 2) all the attacking forces are destroyed or 3) the attacker elects to retreat. The defender cannot retreat. The exception is submarines, which can submerge (and retreat) if they get the right rolls. Earlier on, you might have taken at least one ...


1

Your own air units don't move with carriers. They start the turn airborne in the sea zone. If they want to be in the same sea as the moved carrier, they have to move there. So, if you don't want them in the battle, just leave them in their original sea zone until the battle is over. If the carrier survives, land them during the non-combat phase. If the ...


1

84 doesn't necessarily mean completely dominant. It can also mean overstretched. I've played games where the Axis was getting pressured by an inevitable European invasion and just managed to claim 84 points with some unsustainable Pacific overreach by the Japanese (grabbing Alaska or Panama, when the US would slam those forces within 2 turns). Another ...


1

This would be an interesting variation. I'm thinking you would have to remove all 3 IPC from Brazil. The timing of when IPCs are delivered has a huge effect. Early IPCs allow the Germans to build up faster and drive Russia back, put a nice force into Africa quickly, or replace one of their lost fighters that they usually lose 1st turn. Even so, losing 3 IPC/...


2

You can play this variant at http://gamesbyemail.com/Games/WW2 in which one option is to have Russia unable to attack until attacked. Having played 1 game this way, I believe it gives too much power to the Axis. The Germans can focus on Africa and can hold E. Europe and Ukraine for several turns, while Japan pulls all forces from the Russian northeast front ...


0

Yes, the AA can fire back. That's because in reality, the firing is "simultaneous." The defender's losses are removed as they are hit in order to keep them "separate" for removal. But the fact of the matter is that the whole defensive complement fires on the turn, including the units taken as casualties. After all the defenders fire, the attacker's ...



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