Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Strong Pass systems are very rare, and as a Highly Unusual method you will never encounter one outside extended team play or without notice. In extremis, adopt your Strong 1C defence by substituting a 1C call for a double of a 1C opening, and warm up the Double cards if opponents open a fert (any call besides Pass that is definitely limited) instead. ...


5

If partner's double of 3C would have been negative, double here is not for penalty. It shows a hand with shortness in the overcalled suit and tolerance for responder's bids. Your plan here is to double and correct partner's potential 3D to 3H. Partner may have passed with a hand like Qxx x AJxx KJTxx, which might make 3NT but also probably beats 3CX by 3 ...


4

It happens all the time. I play standard methods with some partners and an unpopular one (Kaplan-Sheinwold, featuring a 12-14 1NT opener) with others. All my national and international successes have come playing KS. There are several possible reasons for this. Some proponents of unpopular systems would like us to believe that the system is inherently ...


4

Barry Crane (originally Barry Cohen, the Detroit Demon) dominated many aspects of North American bridge for decades playing a system of weak openings and early exits from the auction. This was the antithesis of the systems being expounded by teachers such as Culbertson and Goren, which revolved around sound openings to assist average players in making their ...


4

In general no, there is no convention to convey this information because it is not (yet) important enough to warrant co-opting a call sequence. The subsequent auction will enable the partners to first determine if an 8-card fit exists, then whether either notrump is a suitable contract, or notrump is unsuitable but only 7-card fits are available. Opener ...


4

The most common answer to this problem is called Smolen, which applies when you have game-forcing values. In Smolen, you start with Stayman. If partner shows a 4-card major, proceed as normal with that suit as trumps. If partner denies a major, you bid your 4-card major at the three level. Opener now chooses a strain. With less than game-forcing values, ...


3

This is nonsensical reasoning. In any sort of team game you would be frequently doubling the opponents in to game (minus 530 or 730) for a long shot at a doubled set (of plus 100 or 200). To make matters worse, the double will just refine the ability of declarer to place defensive cards properly, which is already tuned by the 1NT opening. This is simply ...


3

In addition to Opener's notrump openings, whenever Opener rebids notrump to show one of the gap-ranges in the opening notrump structure (typically after opening one of a suit or 1C/2C strong) Responder becomes Captain by virtue of a better grasp of combined partnership holdings. Likewise if Opener makes a splinter raise of Responder's response then ...


3

The system I have played for many years is as following: 1. Opener rebids NT to show a balanced hand with a well defined point range: Responder evaluates his hand as balanced unless making a transfer bid into his own suit. These auctions are very similar to 2NT openings except with greater strength having been shown by Opener. 1a. Opener rebids 2NT with a ...


3

No, not really. When you preempt, you're trying to make it more difficult for your opponents to make a decision. Opponents have game in a suit less frequently when your suit is a major instead of a minor, but eg when you bid 3S, one of the opponents is going to have to make an immediate decision about the viability of 3NT (what do you do in second seat ...


3

Your statistical analysis is completely wrong: As a preempter, your shortness in unbid major(s) increases the likelihood of opponents having an eight-card major fit. This fit doesn't have to be their longest suit, and the hand will often play for more tricks if it isn't. As a matter of systemic agreement the opponents will often choose to play in an ...


2

First, I had no idea that Euchre had a point system (with regard to the value of each card in the deck). I played in college and I found that, more important than a strict strategy on how to play a certain hand, is to learn the habits of your opponents. I realize this is not novel considering card games. But with Euchre it becomes even more important, ...


2

I just played a hand like this at my local club which has dealing machines and all, so definitely a random hand. My partner had 10 diamonds (AKQ, 7 others) and 3 singletons in each of the other suits (one being the QS). I believe he mistakenly opened with 5D because that is premptive and yet, his hand is extremely powerful. In effect, he preempted me as ...


2

i would suggest you look into +1 Ogust (2H) wherein opener responds +1 = bad hand bad suit, +2 = bad hand good suit, +3 = good hand bad suit, +4 = good hand hand good suit. assuming a 5-11 weak 2, i would conclude i had a good hand & suit & respond 3D. partner then can choose between 3NT 4H & 5D. in duplicate responders 1st bid & openers 2nd ...


2

Much of the time your specific defence won't be against the strong pass itself, which is relatively easy to defend. In fact the pass itself can be a weakness of the system as your side can come in before the opponents have described their hand properly. If the pass is actually "super" strong you can defend it like a strong club (above answer). If the pass ...


2

Your question depends strongly on partnership agreements about 2C openings and followups. Evaluation as the weaker hand in the auction depends strongly on the types of hands partner might have. A reasonably common 2C agreement in the US follows these lines: 2C shows most hands with 22+ HCP, and shapely hands with 8.5+ top tricks (though e.g. AKQJxxxxx x x ...


2

There is something to be said for demanding a better quality suit for pre-empting in a minor in front of partner, only so that, with a good hand, partner is better judged to place the contract in 3NT. With a major partner is more likely to place the contract in 4 of your major. If partner has, say, Kx in your minor and enough outside, he might be able to ...


1

As ruds points out in his answer, the expert treatment here holding game-forcing or better values is to play Smolen Transfers. In this case the auction has gone: 1NT pass 2C pass 2D pass ? and (with * indicating the alertable transfer calls): - 2H shows game-invitational (only) values with exactly 4 spades and 5+ hearts; - 2S shows game-invitational ...


1

Possibly the most likely scenario for a responder to end up as a captain is when the responder does a weak take-out. i.e. Opener opens 1 of a suit, Responder says 1 of a different suit, Opener says 2 of his original suit, Responder says 2 of his original suit. Opener passes because it is clear there is no good match, and knows that Responder has chosen to ...


1

Given these assumptions: RHO's overcall is a weak jump overcall; and You and partner are laying a fairly standard 5-card major system with no agreements other than negative doubles for this auction. Then my recommendation is to make a Negative Double. My expectation is that when both majors are unbid, as here, then such a double at this level promises ...


1

If you are playing with a regular partner, you may introduce some conventions. This includes things like underbidding in front of partner and expecting them to adjust for it. Many players I see always underbid and prefer to play a bagging game rather than risk getting set. The problem is that by underbidding, you are losing out on all those 10s that you ...


1

Turn them loose with a computer simulation at first so they can get lots of hands in. Only after seeing the general structure of play will they understand what to even consider when bidding. I suggest a computer simulation as it means you don't have to spend time playing with a completely clueless person and they can learn on their own. If you situation is ...


1

In general, I prefer not to raise a one-level opening bid without the requisite number of trumps, as one tends to use the law of total tricks to decide how the level to which to compete. When partner has opened a weak 2 bid or overcalled in a pre-emptive manner, you are in control and raising with fewer trumps but a lower honour is feasible as you know you ...


1

A lot of "butt-in" interventions are there not so much in a constructive manner to try to find the best contract but to interfere with the opponents' bidding system, which is usually less equipped to deal with it. Pick up most bidding systems and it can be pages and pages of bids and responses and rebids etc, and very little on what to do if the opponents ...


1

I find only 2 disadvantages of precision. Opponents frequently interfere & sometimes psych with the only the desire to interfere. By using control count responses that take into account that interference, that interference is welcome. Thus the disadvantage becomes an advantage. Finding a Precision partner even in a very large club is a challenge. Most ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible