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7

If the diamond quality is vastly better than the clubs, then open 1D planning on rebidding clubs; otherwise open 1C. If the club quality is vastly better than the diamonds, then open 1C and plan on rebidding 1NT if partner responds 1H; the club suit can be expected to run in such a situation, and so how much trouble can you get into in 1NT. Remember that ...


7

You bid it like you’d bid any other minimum balanced hand with no five-card major. Open one of a minor. Rebid NT, raise partner’s major, or pass partner’s 1NT as appropriate. Which minor you open is a matter of partnership agreement. The usual agreement in the US is that 1D can be on three with this shape, but there are some who prefer to have 1D always be ...


5

I'm aware of 3 general approaches to this problem. Each of these approaches has its adherents, and most people seem to think that their own answer is obviously the best approach. I'll list the 3 approaches and their major weaknesses (assuming opener has 3 spades, 1 heart, 4 diamonds, 5 clubs). Open 1C, plan to raise diamonds or spades, and rebid 1NT after ...


5

One you have decided to bid a weak Stayman, it is imperative that you pass opener's rebid. Any subsequent action of any sort by your hand categorically promises 8+ points. Consequently, you must have a hand that can tolerate any of the three acceptable responses to Stayman. It is unwise to make this bid with club tolerance for two reasons: Partner ...


5

My concerns are: That the opponents aren't in this auction yet despite a ton of distribution, and so suits are likely to be breaking badly for us; and My hand is far too strong to make a descriptive splinter call and appoint partner captain of the hand. Therefore I wish to take advantage of the opponents silence to describe my hand, so partner can make ...


5

This is a curious question. You note that the context is five card majors, four card diamond bids, and three card club bids. When you agreed to play this system you must have realized that you would occasionally pick up a 4=4=3=2 hand. What was your plan? Never mind the ones with 14 HCP, how about 12 or 13 HCP? I play 4-card diamond suits with one partner. ...


4

You presume that standards have fallen, when in fact they have risen substantially. Bidding accuracy from the local club game to the highest levels is substantially higher than 50-60 years ago. You are comparing apples to oranges with your strong 1NT example. The modern 15-17 strong NT is all High-Card Points; Goren's 16-18 NT included distribution points ...


4

In this context 2NT is an invitation to game. Your partner probably has around 11-12 points, so he doesn't know if you have enough points between you to make 3NT (you haven't bid anything that shows more points than the bare minimum needed to open). As your hand is pretty weak you should pass. If you had 14 or more points then you would bid 3NT.


4

In the hand given, you can sometimes make 3NT and never make 4H without misdefense. But change South's hand slightly to AKx JTxx Kxxx Ax and 4H has more chances than 3NT: You have 7 top tricks (3 spades, 1 heart, 2 diamonds, 1 club). At 3NT, you must develop two more tricks, and hearts seems like your best shot at that. You must hope for honor-doubleton on ...


4

I agree with Aryabhata as far as general principle. Most beginners and even intermediate players greatly overuse Ace-asking bids -- their primary purpose is to keep you out of a slam when you have the tricks but lack controls in side suits; they shouldn't be used to get into a slam when you're not sure you have the values. A decent agreement in this ...


4

Good question. One caveat to what you mention is that with every losing finesse by declarer you are potentially endplayed. If the defensive strength is predominantly in one hand, best not to double; make declarer guess whether the endplay is on or not, as he may have alternative lines that fail. Also, there are only specific circumstances in which it is ...


4

Just to add to what Peter said: You should double a contract if: It's unlikely to go down if you don't. (Lead-directing doubles) What you stand to gain if it goes down outweighs what you stand to lose if it doesn't, remembering that your double is going to help declarer. This is situation #2, and there are no hard and fast rules to apply here. You need ...


4

If your partner has as little as that, your opponents are easily making 3NT and will find it difficult to double your side for penalties (low-level doubles are almost all for takeout these days). However, if your partner has as much as xxx JTxxx AQx Kx (and your partner might well hold that much even as a passed hand), your side can make 5H and your ...


3

It is probably a matter of partnership agreement. It depends on what other sequences you have available and what they would show. For instance, do you play Texas transfers (i.e. 4D and 4H are also transfers)? There is no clear-cut answer. But, absent any discussion, without having a found fit yet (when opening bid is 1 or 2NT), I would take any jump to 4NT ...


3

4432, 5332, and 4333 shapes are all balanced, and should be bid as such. It is my sense that these days, it is common to open 1NT even with a 5-card major, although it is not universal. Pairs with weak 1NT openers are less likely to open a 5-card major with 1NT because they have a different set of methods than pairs with strong NT openers. In America these ...


3

1) Yes, there are systems that that open these ugly 11 counts (Repeat after me: Subtract a point for 4-3-3-3 distribution!), but they are (a) strong club systems that limit an opening bid to 15 or so HCP; (b) systems with a weak NT; or (c) systems with a strong club AND a weak NT. N.B. The average playing potential, in both NT and a suit contract, is almost ...


3

There's a few reasons to take a bid here. The bidding has gone 1C-1S-P. This indicates that RHO likely has fewer than 6 HCP. Let's consider a few different scenarios. If partner has only 8 HCP, LHO has an extremely strong hand. You would like to force LHO to take a second bid at 2NT or above, rather than at the one level. 2SX is likely to be fairly ...


3

The SAYC card specifies strong jump shifts by responder after a 1H opener, further explaining that it invites a slam. This suggests a 17-19 HCP range with 5+ cards and a good honor holding in the bid suit (though I warn you that point-count is insufficient to evaluate many slam invitational hands, and e.g. AKJxxxx Axx Kx x is a 15-count that suggests a ...


3

The preference for takeout doubles particularly with regard to competitive auctions like 1,2 and 3 is due to the likelihood of having either a straight out penalty hand or one that wishes to play in another suit- the latter is judged to far more likely. You could also end up playing in no-trumps when opponents could make or just go down not enough doubled to ...


3

An Alternative Method Most players will learn when to bid by feel, but for those who are not yet at that point or prefer something more concrete, you can assign a score to your hand, in order to determine whether you should bid. Some players use a 3-2-1 point system, with the bowers worth 3 points each, face trumps worth 2 points each, and low trumps or ...


3

While I agree with Aryabhata about the given hand, it is possible in more-or-less standard bidding to bid opponents' suit naturally. For instance, consider the auction 1C-X-1H-2H. In this case, partner promises either heart support or a very strong hand. Responder only promises a 4-card heart suit and not much in terms of values (responder may have 5 hearts, ...


3

In Standard American bidding (and 2/1 game forcing for that matter), after partner's 1H opening, 1S promises at least 4 spades. After 1H-1S, partner's mostly likely calls are 1NT (5332 shape with no more than 14 HCP), 2 of a minor (5-4 or better in the bid suits, may have anything short of a game force in terms of values), 2H (6+ hearts, probably less than ...


3

“legal” is a meaningless question without knowing where you are, and, in many regions, some methods are only legal at higher levels of play. Some of the more common uncommon system types (systems may also fit into more than one category): Canapé: opening the shorter of your two suits. (How they bid one-suited and balanced hands varies.) This was used a ...


3

I will start by saying that a 26-27 hcp requirement for games is old-fashioned in the extreme. I most often see a recommendation of 25 hcp for 3NT or 4M games, and occasionally see that shaded to 24 hcp. Along those lines, I raise a 15-17 1NT to game with nearly any 9-count. Probably more useful than upgrading 5332 hands is downgrading 4333 hands. Many ...


2

Very few experts advocate, or use, the Rule of 20 as a primary guideline on bidding. Rather, it is used as a secondary measure to assist judgement on close calls, and to aid in discriminating between otherwise similar hands when making a call decision. The reason for this is that it is rather indiscriminate, and lacks the precision and accuracy of other ...


2

Acol and standard Goren are two well-known systems that use 4 card majors. A main reason for the popularity of five card majors at the present time is the popularity of IMP contests. Five card majors is superior for slam bidding, which is emphasized in IMPS, while four cad majors is superior at matchpoints. However the team games are the most prestigious ...


2

Now that this is open again: Opposite a strong 1 NT, I bid 3D if it is natural, or I transfer to diamonds if that is available. If partner denies support for diamonds I bid 6D. If he shows support for diamonds I investigate 7D with what-ever methods are available to me. Consider where partner's 16 points are. An "unfortunate" hand from partner would be ...


2

A non-jump rebid by opener of 1NT or 2NT shows a balanced 12-14 HCP hand (sometimes with a singleton in responder's suit). A single-jump rebid of 2NT or 3NT by opener shows the 18-19 HCP balanced hand. Partner's jump-shift in spades shows a very good hand, and a very good suit; you should always reveal 3-card support promptly, when you have it, by raising ...


2

The ACBL booklet (quick reference) on SAYC can be found here: http://www.acbl.org/documentlibrary/play/sayc_book.pdf. According to that (page 3), NT rebids by opener at the lowest available level show a minimum hand. (Of course, that probably does not apply when responder initially bids 1NT). Based on your edit, it looks like you have some confusion ...



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