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7

You bid it like you’d bid any other minimum balanced hand with no five-card major. Open one of a minor. Rebid NT, raise partner’s major, or pass partner’s 1NT as appropriate. Which minor you open is a matter of partnership agreement. The usual agreement in the US is that 1D can be on three with this shape, but there are some who prefer to have 1D always be ...


6

I can't speak for most experts, but I can speak for myself. I never downgrade a balanced 15-count. I occasionally upgrade a balanced 14-count, and I know several good players who do it more frequently (and announce "a good 14-17" when their partners open). Likewise, I never downgrade an 18-count into a 1NT opener, but occasionally upgrade a 17-count into a ...


5

My concerns are: That the opponents aren't in this auction yet despite a ton of distribution, and so suits are likely to be breaking badly for us; and My hand is far too strong to make a descriptive splinter call and appoint partner captain of the hand. Therefore I wish to take advantage of the opponents silence to describe my hand, so partner can make ...


5

One you have decided to bid a weak Stayman, it is imperative that you pass opener's rebid. Any subsequent action of any sort by your hand categorically promises 8+ points. Consequently, you must have a hand that can tolerate any of the three acceptable responses to Stayman. It is unwise to make this bid with club tolerance for two reasons: Partner ...


5

This is a curious question. You note that the context is five card majors, four card diamond bids, and three card club bids. When you agreed to play this system you must have realized that you would occasionally pick up a 4=4=3=2 hand. What was your plan? Never mind the ones with 14 HCP, how about 12 or 13 HCP? I play 4-card diamond suits with one partner. ...


4

In this context 2NT is an invitation to game. Your partner probably has around 11-12 points, so he doesn't know if you have enough points between you to make 3NT (you haven't bid anything that shows more points than the bare minimum needed to open). As your hand is pretty weak you should pass. If you had 14 or more points then you would bid 3NT.


4

I agree with Aryabhata as far as general principle. Most beginners and even intermediate players greatly overuse Ace-asking bids -- their primary purpose is to keep you out of a slam when you have the tricks but lack controls in side suits; they shouldn't be used to get into a slam when you're not sure you have the values. A decent agreement in this ...


4

Just to add to what Peter said: You should double a contract if: It's unlikely to go down if you don't. (Lead-directing doubles) What you stand to gain if it goes down outweighs what you stand to lose if it doesn't, remembering that your double is going to help declarer. This is situation #2, and there are no hard and fast rules to apply here. You need ...


4

Good question. One caveat to what you mention is that with every losing finesse by declarer you are potentially endplayed. If the defensive strength is predominantly in one hand, best not to double; make declarer guess whether the endplay is on or not, as he may have alternative lines that fail. Also, there are only specific circumstances in which it is ...


4

If your partner has as little as that, your opponents are easily making 3NT and will find it difficult to double your side for penalties (low-level doubles are almost all for takeout these days). However, if your partner has as much as xxx JTxxx AQx Kx (and your partner might well hold that much even as a passed hand), your side can make 5H and your ...


4

“legal” is a meaningless question without knowing where you are, and, in many regions, some methods are only legal at higher levels of play. Some of the more common uncommon system types (systems may also fit into more than one category): Canapé: opening the shorter of your two suits. (How they bid one-suited and balanced hands varies.) This was used a ...


4

There's no one correct answer for a situation like this. It's a judgement call. I would have passed, for two reasons. One is that the club overcall means my CK is less likely to be useful. The other is that I was understrength for 1NT to begin with. The hand counts to 15 HCP, but it's worth somewhat less due to the lack of aces and the unprotected SQ. This ...


3

In Standard American bidding (and 2/1 game forcing for that matter), after partner's 1H opening, 1S promises at least 4 spades. After 1H-1S, partner's mostly likely calls are 1NT (5332 shape with no more than 14 HCP), 2 of a minor (5-4 or better in the bid suits, may have anything short of a game force in terms of values), 2H (6+ hearts, probably less than ...


3

It is probably a matter of partnership agreement. It depends on what other sequences you have available and what they would show. For instance, do you play Texas transfers (i.e. 4D and 4H are also transfers)? There is no clear-cut answer. But, absent any discussion, without having a found fit yet (when opening bid is 1 or 2NT), I would take any jump to 4NT ...


3

4432, 5332, and 4333 shapes are all balanced, and should be bid as such. It is my sense that these days, it is common to open 1NT even with a 5-card major, although it is not universal. Pairs with weak 1NT openers are less likely to open a 5-card major with 1NT because they have a different set of methods than pairs with strong NT openers. In America these ...


3

While I agree with Aryabhata about the given hand, it is possible in more-or-less standard bidding to bid opponents' suit naturally. For instance, consider the auction 1C-X-1H-2H. In this case, partner promises either heart support or a very strong hand. Responder only promises a 4-card heart suit and not much in terms of values (responder may have 5 hearts, ...


3

The preference for takeout doubles particularly with regard to competitive auctions like 1,2 and 3 is due to the likelihood of having either a straight out penalty hand or one that wishes to play in another suit- the latter is judged to far more likely. You could also end up playing in no-trumps when opponents could make or just go down not enough doubled to ...


3

An Alternative Method Most players will learn when to bid by feel, but for those who are not yet at that point or prefer something more concrete, you can assign a score to your hand, in order to determine whether you should bid. Some players use a 3-2-1 point system, with the bowers worth 3 points each, face trumps worth 2 points each, and low trumps or ...


3

Against weaker players than yourselves, the opposite is more likely to pay off. Traditionally, strong rubber bridge players deliberately sandbag with a part score, inviting the opponents to save against the game bid and then doubling for penalties. One or two such penalties easily replaces the (possibly) lost rubber bonus, and any others are bonus. A side ...


3

I will start by saying that a 26-27 hcp requirement for games is old-fashioned in the extreme. I most often see a recommendation of 25 hcp for 3NT or 4M games, and occasionally see that shaded to 24 hcp. Along those lines, I raise a 15-17 1NT to game with nearly any 9-count. Probably more useful than upgrading 5332 hands is downgrading 4333 hands. Many ...


3

Your opening style seems fine, but responder should prefer to bid 1 heart or 1 spade holding four cards in the major to go along with support in your minor. That is, after you have opened 1C, partner should respond 1H holding x xxxx xxx AKxxx There are a number of reasons for this; perhaps the most important is that making ten tricks in a major-suit ...


2

My duplicate bridge teacher suggested a 2D response as either negative or "waiting" in order to see what suit(s) the opener rebid. That might keep the responder from winning the bid and exposing the stronger hand as dummy.


2

As already pointed out, 4432 hands are balanced and must be bid as such: With 16-19 HCP open a minor (1D if they are 44, 1C if they are 33, else the longest) and rebid 2NT. With 20-21 HCP open 2NT. With 22+ open 2C and rebid 2NT. For 12-14 pt. 4441 hands: singleton heart or spade: open 1D and either raise partner's suit or rebid 2C. singleton ...


2

Assuming that you play 4th Suit Forcing (and possibly artificial), then partner has denied game-forcing values by choosing not to bid 2H. This means that the 2NT bid is invitational, and you should pass to show your minimum. A hand only a bit better that could consider continuing to 3NT is KT9x-Kx-Tx-AQT9x. Now the extra T's and 9's significantly raises the ...


2

This is a matter of partnership understanding and taste more than systemic; most natural bidding systems may be played either way. First, you would never make strong raises of partner's major (splinter, jump to 3M or 4M, etc) with only 3-card support. This is exclusively for the auction 1m-1M-2M. 4-3 fits are much less fun to play at the 4-level than the ...


2

On this particular hand, North rates to have 3 spades, 5 hearts, and no minor-suit shortness to go along with minimum game-forcing values. If North's hand is xxx KJxxx Kx KQx, then you can safely exit a heart every time you're on lead, likely taking one or two hearts, two spades, and a diamond (Note that this is a hand that stretched to make game, and even ...


2

There is a convention called "exclusion blackwood" (some call it "voidwood"). This way you can ask for aces, excluding one suit. This call can be made by bidding your void suit, in a level above your fit suit, provided that a fit has been found. In your example, all bids (4s,5c,5d) are exclusion blackwood. Partner can respond in steps, just like steps on ...


2

The things your partner need most to know about are your spade void and strong diamonds. So I would bid three diamonds [changed from spades], to show my stopper in that suit. If partner has "nothing" to say, he'll bid hearts, but more likely, he'll bid four clubs to show his ace in that suit. Then you can bid four spades [changed from diamonds] to show ...


2

You need only four spades to respond one spade. When your partner opens, you are expected to try to keep the bidding open if possible. That's why you need only four of a major to respond, and as little six points (although you may have a lot more). The fact that you have four spades is valuable information. Your bid (in a new suit) is forcing, meaning that ...


2

Your 2C was nonforcing; partner could have passed 2C but instead showed a preference for your first suit with 2D. This is to play. Depending on your responding style, partner could have as little as KTxxx xxxx xx xx or as much as KQxx Qxx Jxx xxx In any case, you don't have quite enough to take another bid and should pass. To bid again, you should have ...



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