Hot answers tagged

7

Rule of 13 trumps Rule of 15. If you have 13 points you open. If you read the first few sentences of the article you linked, it says clearly you only apply that when you have 9-12 points.


5

The choice a partnership makes in this regard will influence their relative strength at Matchpoints vs IMPS. Opening wide-range pre-empts facilitate more frequent interference with the opponent's auctions, but make finding game or slam yourself more difficult. This is a clear Matchpoint strategy (as emphasizing the frequency of a winning result on the hand). ...


4

The most common answer to this problem is called Smolen, which applies when you have game-forcing values. In Smolen, you start with Stayman. If partner shows a 4-card major, proceed as normal with that suit as trumps. If partner denies a major, you bid your 4-card major at the three level. Opener now chooses a strain. With less than game-forcing values, ...


4

It happens all the time. I play standard methods with some partners and an unpopular one (Kaplan-Sheinwold, featuring a 12-14 1NT opener) with others. All my national and international successes have come playing KS. There are several possible reasons for this. Some proponents of unpopular systems would like us to believe that the system is inherently ...


4

Barry Crane (originally Barry Cohen, the Detroit Demon) dominated many aspects of North American bridge for decades playing a system of weak openings and early exits from the auction. This was the antithesis of the systems being expounded by teachers such as Culbertson and Goren, which revolved around sound openings to assist average players in making their ...


4

In general no, there is no convention to convey this information because it is not (yet) important enough to warrant co-opting a call sequence. The subsequent auction will enable the partners to first determine if an 8-card fit exists, then whether either notrump is a suitable contract, or notrump is unsuitable but only 7-card fits are available. Opener ...


4

I have a friend that preempts at the two level with defense and at the three level without. He doesn't get very good results from that treatment. In my opinion, AKQxxxx xx xx xx should be opened 3S in any seat and vulnerability. If you were 7321 instead of 7222, you could consider 1S if your partnership opens light. If you're in third seat and RHO opened, ...


4

Two separate questions: Should N have bid 3NT straight off the bat? In my opinion, yes, at any form of scoring, for the reasons you mentioned, and also to conceal information about N and S's shape from West (think about how much easier the lead is after a Stayman auction than after 1NT - 3NT). Given that N initiated a Stayman sequence, should S have ...


4

It is critical when opening in Fourth Seat to make a plus on the hand - you have passed a simple opportunity to score zero, so should have a good reason to believe opponents cannot outbid you or set you. If holding less than full values you must have both length and strength in the Major suits. This is an excellent (light) fourth-seat opening of 1S (even ...


4

Wide ranging weak 2s are so common that there is a well-known convention called Ogust for dealing with them. After a bid of 2N by responder, opener's bids at the 3 level give no information other than whether his or her hand is stronger or weaker (usually 7 vs 8 losers) and whether his or her pre-empting suit is better or worse (usually how many of the top ...


3

Yes - many pairs play that "forcing to game" actually means forcing to 3N. As always, this is up to partnership agreement.


3

First the general points - if you and partner have a fit, opponents are almost guaranteed to have a fit also. Values in the opponents' suit detract from the overall playing strength of your hand, and should be evaluated accordingly, but that does not relieve you from the obligation to share information with partner. The scoring table clearly favours major ...


3

A very popular hand evaluation technique for fourth seat openers is "Cassino count." This adds high card points and the number of spades. Typically the Rule of 15 is used -- if your high card points plus your number of spades is 15 or higher, you may open in fourth seat. This reflects Pieter's point above -- you want to go plus, so you don't want your ...


3

In addition to Opener's notrump openings, whenever Opener rebids notrump to show one of the gap-ranges in the opening notrump structure (typically after opening one of a suit or 1C/2C strong) Responder becomes Captain by virtue of a better grasp of combined partnership holdings. Likewise if Opener makes a splinter raise of Responder's response then ...


3

This is nonsensical reasoning. In any sort of team game you would be frequently doubling the opponents in to game (minus 530 or 730) for a long shot at a doubled set (of plus 100 or 200). To make matters worse, the double will just refine the ability of declarer to place defensive cards properly, which is already tuned by the 1NT opening. This is simply ...


3

The system I have played for many years is as following: 1. Opener rebids NT to show a balanced hand with a well defined point range: Responder evaluates his hand as balanced unless making a transfer bid into his own suit. These auctions are very similar to 2NT openings except with greater strength having been shown by Opener. 1a. Opener rebids 2NT with a ...


2

For opening suit bids no, emphatically not. The reason is simple mathematics in that when you open (in 1st or 2nd seat) you have no idea whether your side is looking at part score, game, or slam; and the appropriate aggressiveness towards each of these levels varies differently with vulnerability. The relative worth of game to part-score goes up with ...


2

There is Every Hand An Adventure, which is playable but not really a serious system. The goal was basically to make the most disruptive, playable, reasonably natural, ACBL-legal system possible. At least some versions of it included n-3 level overcalls on every hand with less than 12 points, a singleton or void, and an n-card suit, no individual judgement ...


2

To answer your specific question: Other than third-seat favourable vulnerability, only when you are specifically interested in a small short-term bump in your results against weak club competition, and are willing to sacrifice your overall partnership rapport and skill level in order to do so. Your argument is extremely faulty. If one is allowed to open 3 ...


2

Your question depends strongly on partnership agreements about 2C openings and followups. Evaluation as the weaker hand in the auction depends strongly on the types of hands partner might have. A reasonably common 2C agreement in the US follows these lines: 2C shows most hands with 22+ HCP, and shapely hands with 8.5+ top tricks (though e.g. AKQJxxxxx x x ...


2

When you hold a hand like this you should not think, WHAT game you should play, it's better to discover SHOULD you play a game or not! Theory gives us some clues: if your partner whispers you that he has 4 hearts - you can count losers in your hand - a bit less than 10 losers (counting by Klinger). That means, that 4hearts will never (never!!!) be ...


2

There are two important points: 1. What does your partner expects, when you open 2/3/4 spades? If my partner opens weak two, i expect a hand almost enough to open 1sp. i explain to all my students: open with reasonable suit think: "what if your partner has other major?". Do you like to miss it? KQJ9xx, xxxx, Kx, x - it's ok to open 2sp, KQxxxx, Jxxx, ...


2

(Too long for a comment) A very important rule of thumb in competitive bidding is the Law of Total Tricks. This says that, for most hands, tricks you make in your contract + tricks they make in their contract = number of trumps your partnership has + number of trumps their partnership has There is a further simplification, which says that, in most cases, ...


2

This is a matter of partnership agreement! The disadvantage of agreeing that you can jump in with 11hcp and a singleton is that opener could have a quite strong hand, and doubling gives opener the option of passing with it. This gives opponents the option of doubling your partner, and they also gain information that is useful in the play. Another ...


2

This issue was discussed on the Bridge Laws Mailing List a few months ago: Do players have to describe what they play? Cribbing from my own post there: Edgar Kaplan (the "K" in K & R) wrote to the effect that the convention card is an understanding with partner, not an undertaking to the opponents. HCP are an approximation of a hand's ...


2

Because the evaluation mechanism you have adopted is generating more variation than typical, I strongly recommend that you note its use on your (and partner's) convention card. I would also suggest typing a small summary of the mechanism to keep with your convention card for opponents to refer to. Having done this, I see no reason for any concern; you are: ...


2

In addition to the excellent answers already, I would note that there is a difference in seat for most expert players, also. First seat preempts both opponent, so will be a bit wider. Say 4-10. Second seat preempts only one opponent (and one partner), so a bit narrower. Say 6-10. Third seat is more complex as they often can open at the 1 level many 8-10 ...


1

Larry Cohen here explicitly provides, as an example of failing the Rule of Fifteen, this eleven point hand: S: 3 H: K J 5 4 D: K J 8 7 C: K 9 8 7 However, he proposes the CRIFS variant - Cohen's Rule in Fourth Seat - Whenever the Pearson Points count (HCP + # of Spades) is between 14 and 16, instead assess your opponents. If they are amongst the better ...


1

There are many ways to evaluate a hand, and you and your partner are at liberty to choose whichever you wish. But you are not entitled to insist that your opponents use the same system; if you tell them that you will open any hand with 13 points and then pass with 14 you have misled them, which is what the system is designed to prevent. You also appear to ...


1

My philosophy is that if one has reasonable expectation that partnership assets total 18 HCP or better, and that one's own holding in the opponents' suit is shorter then partner's, then one strives to enter the auction. If partner never has to consider balancing with the hope that you are short in the opponent's suit to compensate for his three little, (s)he ...



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