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1

I just played a hand like this at my local club which has dealing machines and all, so definitely a random hand. My partner had 10 diamonds (AKQ, 7 others) and 3 singletons in each of the other suits (one being the QS). I believe he mistakenly opened with 5D because that is premptive and yet, his hand is extremely powerful. In effect, he preempted me as ...


3

No, not really. When you preempt, you're trying to make it more difficult for your opponents to make a decision. Opponents have game in a suit less frequently when your suit is a major instead of a minor, but eg when you bid 3S, one of the opponents is going to have to make an immediate decision about the viability of 3NT (what do you do in second seat ...


3

Your statistical analysis is completely wrong: As a preempter, your shortness in unbid major(s) increases the likelihood of opponents having an eight-card major fit. This fit doesn't have to be their longest suit, and the hand will often play for more tricks if it isn't. As a matter of systemic agreement the opponents will often choose to play in an ...


0

This site has point system. It seems well thought out. Not only does it give, points for the bower, but also the up-card, which is very important when bidding. Euchre Point System


-1

This is kind of a "restricted choice" question. Because the assumption is that you removed QJ from the trump suit, dealt declarer five trumps at random (plus the values for a one spade bid), and then asked, would declarer rather see that QJ in the dummy or three little ones. (I've eliminated the possibility of declarer seeing either Q or J in his own hand.) ...


1

In general, I prefer not to raise a one-level opening bid without the requisite number of trumps, as one tends to use the law of total tricks to decide how the level to which to compete. When partner has opened a weak 2 bid or overcalled in a pre-emptive manner, you are in control and raising with fewer trumps but a lower honour is feasible as you know you ...


1

Turn them loose with a computer simulation at first so they can get lots of hands in. Only after seeing the general structure of play will they understand what to even consider when bidding. I suggest a computer simulation as it means you don't have to spend time playing with a completely clueless person and they can learn on their own. If you situation is ...



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