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15

Option B, but not for the reason you think. You have made two errors: When you take insurance, you may insure only up to half of your original bet, turning what would ordinarily be a loss into a push at 2:1. In this case, if your wager was $200, you could insure for up to $100. Once insurance is "closed," the dealer checks to see whether he or she has a ...


8

First off Ace value is either 1 or 11 (this is why face+ace is a blackjack) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackjack Second you choose what it is worth, but most places will assume you want 11 unless it will bust you So in your hand you can choose between 12,22,22,32


6

After doing a lot more research and sometimes even stumbling across answers for this while looking up other topics, I found a few good reasons why someone would use a suit aware system. I had way better results found when looking up the more well-known Red Seven counting system rather than the KISS II and KISS III methods which are not as commonly known as ...


6

The dealer has several options when exercising his duties. His employer wants him to generate as much revenue as possible, which means: Dealing as many hands as possible Giving the players a fun experience, along with some tiny hope that they could get an edge naturally Detecting advantage players (card counters) and using counter measures to thwart them, ...


4

You shouldn't have much trouble at all finding a chart.. What you are looking for is known as Basic Strategy Replace any double/split with a hit, surrender with fold if your simulation does not allow it. Edit: As Hymie pointed out in the comments, splits are not always a hit.. in fact many splits you would stand on. A close approximation would be to use ...


4

The answer is almost certainly no. Card counting is used primarily to determine how much to bet - a standard strategy might look like: -1 or smaller: find a better table -1 to +1: bet table minimum (still in casino's favor but worth waiting around) +1 or higher: start betting big (the game has tilted in your favor) Now I haven't run the simulations, but ...


3

The hand is always scored to give the best possible value for the player, such that they have the highest score they can get without going bust. The player never chooses the values or the score; it is decided by the rule and the cards on the table. A+A+X will always be valued as 12+X, unless this would bust, in which case it must be valued as 12 (since the ...


2

From Wikipedia: $2.50 chips are mostly used for blackjacktables, since a "natural" (a 21 on the first two cards dealt to a player) typically pays 3:2 and most wagers are in increments of $5. However, the Tropicana Casino and Borgatain Atlantic City, New Jersey, and others, have used $2.50 (pink) chips in $7.50 to $15 and $10 to $20 poker games. They ...


1

Each ace has it's value determined separately. If you somehow drew 4 aces, you could have 4, 14, 24, 34, or 44 as the value of your hand.


1

Why not make the software self learning? There are several strategies. Code them all (preferably parameterized). Now start a sequence of simulations and compare the results for each strategy. You can then drop the worst and add adaptations of the winners. Then continue. Until you are satisfied by the result. For the final product, use some of the winning ...


1

The big problem I see right off the bat is that just counting the two card hands wouldn't give you an understanding of the cards left in the shoe, it would be too imprecise: Here's the 2 card hands you could (ever) possibly stand on: 12 (vs some dealer up cards) 13 (vs some dealer up cards) 14 (vs some dealer up cards) 15 (vs some dealer up cards) 16 (vs ...


1

The disadvantage of your system is that it is imprecise, as discussed below; the advantage is that it is a "nonstandard" method of card counting, and you may get less "heat" from the casino. But I think you're onto something here. First, there are 20 10- and 11- valued cards (counting aces) in the deck, and 32 other cards, in a ratio of nearly 2 to 3. ...



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