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12

The small board focuses on close fighting. You're right; it is recommended for beginners for developing fighting skill and tactics, but the strategy component is lacking--at least when compared to a 19x19 board. The big board is not just like playing 4 small board games next to each other. Through ladders and potential escape routes, the stones on one side ...


11

There are some common sizes and yes, they depend. It's not really about which side of whatever ocean you're from, but rather about what factory you make them in. For example, if you ask a factory that produces a 60x42 cm board (random values, here!), they will have these settings in their printing, cutting and folding machines. They will probably accept if ...


8

Almost all go boards are x by x, where x is an odd number (e.g. 9, 13, or 19). The point is to have the product yield an odd number of potential points. So that there would be an odd number of points in the game and a clear winner. (In the Japanese counting style of "points," it is possible for both players to have the same number, but under the Chinese ...


8

Well one point towards squares is simplicity. It is a much easier system to grok (outside of weird rules for diagonals) The most important thing to consider is what your playing field is. If you are talking about a mostly open plain with very few obstacles, then a hex field is great as it avoids the diagonal rule cleanly. However if you were going with, ...


6

To use a metaphor, what's the difference between a barroom brawl and a full-scale war? The brawl is faster and just as decisive at the end, but if you rush the front lines of an opposing army swinging a barstool, you'll probably not get very far. You need to rely on your commanders and your fellow soldiers to get you close enough that your barstool will ...


5

On an even sized board it is much easier to mirror your opponent's moves (this special tactic is known as "mane go"). Playing the tengen point on an odd sized board is a move that cannot be mirrored.


4

What is the nature of your game? Combat, commerce, both? This might shape the role of movement in your game as well. Hex-based maps makes movement slight less expensive, especially when trying to around obstacles. For example, if the player is trying to move their token from South to North, but another player's token is in their way. On a square-based ...


2

Publishers and designers who use consistent (if not standard) sized boxes (such as Queen Games, Friedmann Friese, etc) often end up with semi-standard board sizes as a side effect. If the inside of your box is 12x8" then you're going to end up with boards that are a multiple of that size, usually a 2x2 or 2x3 of folds of that size.


2

The winning strategy for such a small Hex board is shown in this basic strategy guide. Like tic-tac-toe, on a 4x4 board white will always win by opening on the main diagonal, because for every counter that black can make, there is another way for white to force the win. Once white can form a "two-bridge" by placing the second piece in a non-adjacent space ...


1

consider looking at how other games solve this problem, For example Settlers of Catan adds a "sea" around the boad which fills in the uneven edges when using full hexagons and gives a uniform diamond at the edge. Something along those lines might be the best way to resolve your problem. Alternatively you can design your overall boards such that the overflow ...


1

Just speculation: Boards with even lengths are rarely used because there is no tengen and because handicap stones cannot be placed point symmetrically in a 9x9 grid.


1

As long as the grid is even, Othello should play just fine, provided you change the staring cluster. . . . . . . B W . . B W B . . . W B . should do, with white moving first...


1

Early in my Go education I played black with a 4 stone handicap on a 13x13 board. My opponent invaded the 3,3 point in all four corners, and I played the Joseki perfectly - but lost miserably. On a 19x19 board I would have been in healthy shape with tremendous influence into the centre, as well as 4 half-sides, instead of owning a tiny area barely half ...



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