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16

Spades. I think Spades is the easiest starting point, because is (1) easy and (2) the point is winning tricks, making it more consistent with the logic of other games. IMHO, spades shares more in common with the other games. Hearts has the reverse logic -- you are generally trying to LOSE tricks, not win them. If you start with spades, you spend your ...


16

To best understand the answer to this question, it helps to understand the purpose of bidding and bidding systems. Bidding is an attempt by two partners to predict the number of tricks their combined hands can win in the play. The purpose of bidding is for each partnership to ascertain which contract, whether made or defeated and whether bid by them or by ...


14

Wikipedia says that any bridge bidding system is a well-defined form of legal table talk: Each bidding system ascribes a meaning to every possible call by each member of a partnership, and presents a codified language which allows the players to exchange information about their card holdings. That would seem to imply that there is no skill involved at ...


14

East reneged (played an out-of-suit card when they had a card of the correct suit), but fixed the error before the next trick; since they're the defender, two things happen: East's small spade is left face up on the table in front of East. It's a "major penalty" card, and must be played by East as soon as it is legal to do so, on some future trick. ...


12

"Deception" is a weird concept in bridge. Just like in every game, there are forms that are ethical and forms that are not. Falsecarding, as in your example, is perfectly fine. Your opponent failed to count trumps correctly, and paid the price. A similar, and perfectly valid strategy, is to play a high card instead of a low card when losing a trick as ...


12

I'm going to go for a "so simple it's possibly insulting" answer here. Hopefully it won't actually be taken amiss! Bridge is a complicated game. There's a lot to take in, and in many ways there is no end to the amount of obsessive fine-tuning you can do to your system. A beginning player who has just brought a fat Bridge tome and read bits and pieces of ...


12

Bridge players hate guessing. Allowing non-disclosure will basically turn the game into a pointless guessing game, with luck (and to some extent, the bidding system) becoming the predominant factor, rather than skill. This will surely drive away the good players, and all that will be left will be self proclaimed bidding theorists... Just because you cannot ...


11

I know I am a bit late, but there is a lot more to Bidding than just applying a set of rules. There is this aspect of bidding called 'judgement' which does not depend on the bidding system you use, and this is where the skill and experience of better players shows. In fact, top players would claim that the system is immaterial (implying that it is judgement ...


11

I am no bridge historian, but wouldn't the underlying answer have to do with the underlying "path dependence?" This is a standard: Most people in Britain use weak 1 NT, so people in Britain first learn weak 1 NT. Conversely, most people in the US use strong 1 NT, so most people in USA first learn strong 1 NT. The main idea of path dependence is that there ...


11

In an ACBL tournament, yes, your play is improper.. In fact, hesitating in this situation is specifically called out as unacceptable. From the Laws of Duplicate Bridge, in the section under Proprieties: (emphasis mine) "A player may not attempt to mislead an opponent by means of remark or gesture, through the haste or hesitancy of a call or play (as in ...


10

I understand how duplicate bridge works, but I'm still missing one small conceptual part of the scoring, being the outcome when a deal is passed out. Is the score for that hand just assumed to be 0 for both sides Yes. Why would there be an exception? Passing out the hand is a perfectly valid way to play it. making it identical to a hand that ...


10

Here are some situations where underruffing might be required. 1) Execute a Throw In Consider the following situation, where spades are trump and south is the declarer. The lead is with West and he leads a diamond. - xxx - - - KQT - - AKQ - - - AJ9 - - - South holding the AJ9 of trumps ...


10

Well, the proper followup is what you have agreed upon. The 'normal' responses to a transfer allow you to bid the major at the 2 level (usual completion of the transfer) or bid the major at the 3 level, which shows a maximum hand and 4 cards in the major in question (called super-accept). Assuming your agreement is the above, bidding 2NT with doubleton in ...


10

Assuming you are playing some simple form of standard american, yes your thinking was wrong on both hands. Usually the responder is supposed to "bid up the line", giving preference to majors in case she has a 6-9 point hand. With the first hand, you can either bid 1D or 1S. The reason to bid 1S instead of 1D is that the auction 1C-1D-1H-1S might have a ...


10

2 sections to my answer: How to get up and running in 20 minutes Next steps to progress from the 20 minute version to solid Bridge beginner How to get up and running in 20 minutes It's simply not possible to play the full game of bridge itself after 20 minutes in a way that satisfies or even makes any sense. However, one can make use of a Gateway game ...


10

If you routinely take 2-3 seconds before each play of the cards, that is ethical. If you usually play cards more quickly, but take a pause when you have a problem, that is ethical. If, on the other hand, you usually play cards more quickly, take a pause when you have a problem, and sometimes take a pause when you don't have a problem to throw declarer off, ...


9

There are two main advantages I see to the strong 1 NT: When your partner is very weak, the strong 1NT is far more likely to make (and far less likely to be doubled) than the weak 1NT. Though 15-17 is much rarer than 12-14, when it does occur it is very easy to put the contract in the right place with the strong hand as declarer. Hiding the partnership's ...


9

If you are looking for free online site, I would strongly recommend BridgeBase Online, or BBO for short. You can create an account by just specifying a username and password and either login using the web browser or using their downloadable windows version of the software. BBO has a lot of features, like partnership bidding rooms, GIB robots (which you ...


9

A much more important reason is to allow the responder to describe their hand more fully. A 1NT opening bid describes both shape and point count and so it's usually up to responder to then set the contract - the 1NT opener will typically not bid again. However, responder with points for a 2NT raise and a five card major is in a quandary. Bidding 2NT may mean ...


9

The rule of honors applies to any side. So if you are defending hearts holding AKQJ of hearts, you get the requisite number of points. It really does not matter that there is a bonus for this. In the long run, the luck factor will even out. As to why this is there: Most of initial bridge (i.e. auction bridge) terms and rules (like rubber is two games etc) ...


9

I wholly agree with thesun's answer, particularly "you must squeeze every ounce of potential out of your cards". But since you've posed particular queries at the end of your question: Part-scores are the most obvious difference. If you have strong Hearts, but not strong enough for slam, a Rubber player looks at the scoresheet; with 60 points below the ...


9

Great question! The basic idea is that by playing the card you are known to hold, you do not give declarer any extra information and might mislead declarer about the length of your holding in that suit (the falsecarding bit). (btw, your example about west leading Q and you playing K from Kx not to disclose your A is not completely right. If East has the A, ...


9

I've always understood the general rule to be: open with a weaker hand than usual in third seat, but with a stronger hand than usual in fourth seat. As such, no, it seems like probably a bad idea to pre-empt in the fourth seat, for a couple of reasons. It seems to miss the point of pre-empting entirely. Usually, a pre-emptive bid is meant to deprive the ...


9

Ducking can be used for multiple purposes (not necessarily all on same hand, of course). Some uses of ducking Entry creation: This IMO is the primary use. Sometimes you duck in your side suit to make sure you have enough entries to establish the suit and cash it. Notice that the primary use of hold-up is to prevent opponents from having entries to cash a ...


9

"It takes 26 points to make a game" is clearly a rule of thumb, not a hard rule. Anyone who has played more than a few hands of Bridge should be able to see that, sometimes, light hands combined with intelligent play make a contract; and, sometimes, a solid point count is brought down by a bad lie of cards or a clever defence. I don't think any of this is ...


8

When you open a five card major, you're not promising anything about the strength of your suit, you are simply telling your partner that you have five cards in that suit. Remember that you do not win tricks only on strength, you win them on length as well. Even if you open a raggedy five card suit, and end up playing in it after getting you're partner's ...


8

The short answer is - use whatever your partner and you are comfortable with using. The long answer is - the penalty double at the one or two levels rarely works out the way you think. Either their partner will switch to a different suit (where you may not want to double for penalties again), they will SOS redouble for takeout (again to a suit that you may ...


8

Nearly all American experts would not make a takeout double here, and my impression is that most Europeans would not as well. Having 3 cards in their suit is a flaw when deciding to try and declare the hand rather than defend, and points outside their suits do matter: with only 9 points outside of their suit, your offense-to-defense ratio is low. If opener ...


8

It sounds like you're playing a less formal game, so I don't see a problem with asking the question. In a more formal setting each card would remain in front of the player that played it so the question wouldn't be necessary and most likely an irregularity.



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