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2

For the time being we would assume you are playing a Green system similar to SAYC. There are mainly 3 ways of responding to a natural / semi-natural (2+) non-forcing 1C opening: Up-the-line: You bid your 5-card suits if you have one. Otherwise you simply bid your lowest 4-card suit. Under this method, a 1D opening does NOT deny holding a 4-card Major - ...


-1

That's more or less the general rule, although I would amend your question in two ways. The first is that the point range starts at 6-7, and is unlimited to the upside. The second is that it shows no five card majors (assuming that you are playing five card majors). If you are playing some version of four card majors, it means that you have no biddable ...


1

The key here is that while a Heart continuation may turn out poorly (namely when poor partner was dealt specifically Qx), it will far more often be either safe or best. Further, a switch to either Spades or a minor suit is neither suggested by the appearance of Dummy, nor the slightest bit appetizing. It was a clear error for West to make switch at trick ...


4

East doesn't know West has 5 hearts. If west had only AKxx and east had JTx, then continuing hearts would set up the third round for declarer. So discouraging from JTx, Jxx, or even JTxx (if opening leader could have AKx) is correct. On this hand West should definitely continue hearts. It is safe, and given West's holdings in the minors, it's very unlikely ...


2

The standard agreement is that the Q from East would show either QJ(x)(x) (or a singleton), so East would play the 5 from Q5. Given West, dummy, and the bidding, it's quite possible that East has something like JTxx (or KT9x) in trump, which means a ruff might just use up a natural trump trick, so East may very well discourage with any doubleton. Even if ...


3

Not only do bridge players retain their abilities to a later age than Chess and Go players, they don't even attain their peak ability until an age, around forty or so, when they have decidedly passed their peak in Go and Chess. Bob Hamman, born 1938, was ranked 7th in the world by the World Bridge Federation as of October, 2012, at the age of 74. His ...


1

I don't know anything about Bridge, I played a bit Chess and am a regular Go player. That being said, I completely agree with Arghya's answer and want to add some details from my perspective. I think that Go is evolving through time. As chess. These games have Complete Information (see Wikipedia's article about Game Theory) and still are not difficult to ...


3

From the ACBL Rules: Law 62.D is first applied: On the 12th trick, a revoke, even if established, must be corrected if discovered before all four hands have been returned to the board. In Switzerland we have the same ruling for a trick 12 Revoke. So the revoke will be fully corrected without penalty and the hand is one down.



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