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3

I will start by saying that a 26-27 hcp requirement for games is old-fashioned in the extreme. I most often see a recommendation of 25 hcp for 3NT or 4M games, and occasionally see that shaded to 24 hcp. Along those lines, I raise a 15-17 1NT to game with nearly any 9-count. Probably more useful than upgrading 5332 hands is downgrading 4333 hands. Many ...


0

The principle is actually quite simple. Everyone time a new suit is lead, you can "see" a new set of cards. In the question, you can see 27 cards after the opening lead, and since it's from your opponent's "best" suit, probably eight or nine cards above your 26, after one or two rounds of play. That's 34-35. Suppose you win the second trick and lead a new ...


1

For the sake of a concrete list of plays, I'll give one (with the leader listed). E DJ C2 DK D2 S C3 C9 CT S2 N D3 DT C5 DA S C6 CJ CQ S3 N CA S4 C7 CK N DQ DJ H3 HJ N D8 S5 H4 SJ N D7 S6 H5 SQ N D6 H2 H6 HQ N D5 H7 S7 HK N D4 H8 S8 SK N C8 H9 S9 HA N C4 HT ST SA In real life, North would show their hand after trick 4 and say something like: "I claim the ...


1

Not sure what your question is. Are you looking for a repository where hands are played to the last trick? There are plenty of repositories (check out the Vugraph archive on BBO), but in majority of the hands, you will never see the whole hand played out, but you will see some list of plays. Bridge players hate wasting time on the obvious, and for that ...


0

This is an example of a "cooked" deal. The defender, West, has three AK's and various assorted other values, and yet can't take a single trick because all his cards are badly positioned in the worst possible way. As a result, the hero makes a highly dubious 7 club bid, and a dubious redouble, and gets away with it! Most bridge hands in movies and stories ...


4

Usually play in double-dummy problems (that is problems with all hands visible) is left as an exercise to the reader. The play in this problem depends on the opening lead. If the opening lead is not a diamond, it is ruffed in hand. A diamond is ruffed in dummy and a club played toward hand, where it is won as cheaply as possible. Another diamond is ruffed ...


1

You basically have it right, that some people are willing open good 4-card majors with weakish hands, particularly in 3rd chair, as it is more preemptive than opening a minor, and Drury allows you to stay low. In my experience, there is no consensus on how frequently to do this in third chair. Only once have I ever seen a player playing 5 card majors open ...


-1

One spade over one heart may indicate transfer to 1NT by opener as one spade may have weak hand with minimum 3 carder weak Spade. After 1NT rebid it is passed so that strong hand does not become dummy


2

First, note that playing 4-card majors an opening of 1 Heart or 1 Spade is about 80% likely to be on a five card or longer suit. Thus players of a 4-card major system are already almost playing five-card majors. Bridge theorists and players for the past century have determined that even this slight difference in probability (80% vs 100% for a f+ card bid ...


0

Although in most systems the 'system' bid is one spade, in some systems, a case can also be made for rebidding 1NT in an effort to escape into two diamonds. Eg when playing 2/1, after 1H 1NT, opener will often rebid 2C, and now 2D by you would show a weak hand with long Diamonds. If opener rebids 2D you can pass or raise depending on exactly how strong your ...


-1

With 6-9 high card points, your main choices are to raise hearts (if you have three), bid one spade (if you have four), or bid 1NT if your hand is suitable (not an option with your lopsided hand). You may not bid two diamonds or anything else at the level of two, because a "2 over 1" bid shows 10-12 points and an "invitational" hand (to game in a suit or ...



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