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0

May not move the trump cards to a space where there is a void to the dummies left . May not move other suits into the void space of the Trump suit . may not move any suits that are void into another space which might confuse the declarer.


1

Opening leads are difficult! Either a spade or a diamond could be right. Neither is likely to set the contract often, so it can be difficult to develop a good intuitive feel for which is best. I'd lead a diamond, since diamond strength with partner seems our most likely road to five tricks. It's also the lead least likely to blow a trick. For an empirical ...


2

If opponents have only 24-25 points the auction would likely have involved acceptance of a game invitation. Instead there was a jump to game by responder without a slam try, each opponent having 4 cards in a different major; opponents rate to have 29 points +- 3. You have 8 points in hand, giving partner 3 points +- 3. The likelihood of being able to set up ...


4

You may find the jump from Spades to Contract Bridge much larger than you expect. However the popularity of (generic) Bridge pre-dates the invention of Contract Bridge by Harold Stirling Vanderbilt in 1925. If you have a gaming group interested in advancing their card-play skills together, you might consider jumping first to one of the antecedent games from ...


5

The two games have some similarities. But they have a lot of differences too. Spades is a lot simpler, and so going from Bridge to Spades is relatively easy. Going from Spades to Bridge, well you're slightly ahead of the curve in having played a trick-based partnership game, but there is still a lot of other stuff to learn. To be honest, any general ...


1

An important and often overlooked datum for this situation is that Opening Leader has declined to lead the suit with the important Ace. Of many possible reasons for this decision, two are that he held the Ace in question, or was actually void in the suit. As both of these indicate a slightly increased probability of the interesting Ace being in his partner's ...


1

As ruds points out in his answer, the expert treatment here holding game-forcing or better values is to play Smolen Transfers. In this case the auction has gone: 1NT pass 2C pass 2D pass ? and (with * indicating the alertable transfer calls): - 2H shows game-invitational (only) values with exactly 4 spades and 5+ hearts; - 2S shows game-invitational ...


0

My preference is to lead a K from a "truncated" or "weaker" suit (as defined below) if I can, and an A from a stronger suit. A suit without an A is a "truncated suit, by definition. So if I have KQJ or KQT, I will lead the king. I will also lead the K from AK blank because the suit is "truncated" by having no lower cards. I don't fear your ruff in this ...


-1

I would test the quality of partner's hand by bidding 2 clubs (Stayman), and hope NOT to hear 2 spades. My worst fear is that partner has wasted honors in spades. If I don't hear 2 spades, partner probably has, at most AQJ in spades. Missing the K (or more) or spades, he might be missing one of the following: A of hearts, A of clubs, or the heart and club ...


1

I infer from the phrasing of your question that you are playing a 4-card Major natural system such as Goren. If that is not the case please specify what system you are playing. First, it is vital to correct your statement on the strength of the 1S response to 1H; it is not a limited strength bid of 6-9 HCP but an unlimited strength bid of 6-20+ HCP. It is ...


2

Was this hand posted on July 5, the thirtieth anniversary of Barry Crane's death. Fifth of his eleven commandments is Sevens are singletons. I lead low to the Club Ace at trick three and repeat the Spade finesse at trick four. Assuming it wins I then cash the Spade Ace at trick 5 and if all have followed to the second round of Spades claim making 5, ...


7

The reason that K is traditionally lead from AK is because there are two important circumstances where a different signal is requested from partner (rather than attitude). The Ace lead is reserved for these particular circumstances because it is very important that there be no ambiguity in these circumstances: Notrump: The Ace lead against notrump signals a ...


2

One reason to lead K from AK is that it's actually less ambiguous. Sometimes it is sensible to lead an unsupported ace to see dummy and partner's signal before deciding how to proceed with the defense. For instance, opening leader may have Ax in a side suit, trying to get a ruff if partner encourages to show the king. It's almost never right to lead from Kx ...


4

The most common answer to this problem is called Smolen, which applies when you have game-forcing values. In Smolen, you start with Stayman. If partner shows a 4-card major, proceed as normal with that suit as trumps. If partner denies a major, you bid your 4-card major at the three level. Opener now chooses a strain. With less than game-forcing values, ...


3

This is nonsensical reasoning. In any sort of team game you would be frequently doubling the opponents in to game (minus 530 or 730) for a long shot at a doubled set (of plus 100 or 200). To make matters worse, the double will just refine the ability of declarer to place defensive cards properly, which is already tuned by the 1NT opening. This is simply ...



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