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3

Good bidders prefer to rebid in NT with any balanced or semi-balanced (ie no singleton) hand when a 4-card raise is unavailable. This quickly refines both range and distribution of the opener's hand, enabling more precise bidding by both partners. Only weak player's rush to either show 3-card support or to rebid 5-card suits. One exception to this rule is ...


3

1) Standard American (or 2/1) is almost unique among systems in considering the 3 card raise (after 1-over-1) a normal bid. It's generally not allowed in Acol, SEF, or Forum D (the standard English, French, and German systems), although one occasionally has to do it as the least bad lie (when the alternatives are bidding 1N with a bad singleton, rebidding a ...


4

Typically, with any strong hand (something like 17+) you should begin with a takeout double (if it's available — see below). In this case, your hand is even stronger than that, so you should probably cue bid hearts after almost any bid by partner: after 3S, 4C, or 4D, you have enough to insist on game with very little from partner, so cue bid 4H to ...


-1

The usual responese is known as a "big" (takeout) double. First of all, you can support play in any suit except hearts, so your double asks your partner to bid his best suit. If partner bids your "worst" suit, spades, you can correct to four diamonds. If partner bids one of the minor suits, you can go to five. Or you can "cue bid" four hearts (the opposing ...


-1

Of course, West could become the declarer if he makes the "first bid" in a new suit. But the likely result of his making the double is that he will avoid this. Unless someone else bids, South will become the declarer. West's hope is that the "someone else" will be East, and his side will play the hand. As Pieter noted, West's double is a "call," and not a ...


7

Your understanding is correct: South would be the declarer, playing a contract of two spades doubled. Doubles (and redoubles) never change who is declarer, just the scores for making or failing to make the contract.


1

At the beginning of the auction, Responder is the captain responsible for both level and strain for the partnership. If Responder then completely describes her hand, she then cedes the captaincy to opener.


4

Finesses, now as always, are worth half a trick (absent information about opponents' distributions). In IMPs scoring, it is usually appropriate to take a finesse if that is the most likely way to make your contract, and usually inappropriate to take a finesse if it risks the contract for a chance at an overtrick. Just because a contract is less likely to ...


0

Today with 20 pts, I opened 2NT with a singleton ace of hearts. My partner bid 2 diamonds, I said "transfer" and choose to bid 3 NT. The computer printout, showed we could have made 4clubs, 5 spades, and 5 NT. Didn't play to 5, but did make 4. I was the only player in that contract and the high board. My partner upon laying her hand down, only had 4 hearts, ...


1

In Chicago, or four-deal scoring, a team gets a 100 point premium for making a part score only in the fourth and final deal of the game. If a team is carrying a part score forward from a previous deal, and do not convert it into a game score by the end of the fourth deal, they do not receive a premium.


2

That particular hand should certainly be opened 1♠. 4♠ is a preempt, as has been noted; it's often a preempt-to-make, meaning a hand that you think has a decent shot at actually making 4♠, but only because of the distribution. However, if you'd make that bid with this hand, how will your partner know whether it's appropriate to bid on to slam? There is a ...


4

Until a few years ago most Victory Scales awarded negative VPs to a blitzed team. (This link makes reference to such.) However, by not being at the table on time, ready to play, your teammates are introducing a very disruptive effect on the entire tourney. Your opponents have paid to have an opponent and you have declined to show, for no good reason, and ...


3

Your hand is too strong to open four spades. You might bid like that with AKQ9873 of spades and no other honors. That's because you will be able to take seven tricks in your own hand, but have "no defense" outside of spades. Your ace will likely take one trick against a presumed singleton, but the opponents have a small slam, if partner has nothing.If ...


4

Tl;dr: No, bid 1♠. There are many different sets of bidding conventions in bridge. In the one I learned (some further information here: http://www.rpbridge.net/3j00.htm), 4♠ is a preemptive bid that signals a very long spade suit (which you have) and several points below the regular opening strength of 12 high card points. Your hand is too strong for that ...



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