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In the shortened version: No, they cannot force you to lead from the same suit in the hand that should have led. But they can "accept" your lead from the wrong hand (or reject it). If the next player plays, that is assumed as an acceptance (whether that player was alert or not about the play out of turn). Declarer should not draw an "inference" from the ...


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From the Laws of Contract Bridge - 2014, Law 55 - Declarer's Lead Out of Turn When declarer leads out of turn from his or dummy's hand: A either defender, without consultation, may accept that lead as provided in Law 53; or B. either defender, without consultation, may require declarer to retract that lead. Then, 1. if it was a defender' turn to ...


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There is something to be said for demanding a better quality suit for pre-empting in a minor in front of partner, only so that, with a good hand, partner is better judged to place the contract in 3NT. With a major partner is more likely to place the contract in 4 of your major. If partner has, say, Kx in your minor and enough outside, he might be able to ...


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You are probably better off quoting the Laws of Contract Bridge, 2014 Authorized Edition where Laws 68 through 71 deal with the proper handling of Claims and Concessions. Some pertinent aspects of the relevant rules are reproduced below: Law 68 - Declarer's Claim or Concession of Tricks .... Declarer should not make a claim or concession if there is ...


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I just played a hand like this at my local club which has dealing machines and all, so definitely a random hand. My partner had 10 diamonds (AKQ, 7 others) and 3 singletons in each of the other suits (one being the QS). I believe he mistakenly opened with 5D because that is premptive and yet, his hand is extremely powerful. In effect, he preempted me as ...


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No, not really. When you preempt, you're trying to make it more difficult for your opponents to make a decision. Opponents have game in a suit less frequently when your suit is a major instead of a minor, but eg when you bid 3S, one of the opponents is going to have to make an immediate decision about the viability of 3NT (what do you do in second seat ...


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Your statistical analysis is completely wrong: As a preempter, your shortness in unbid major(s) increases the likelihood of opponents having an eight-card major fit. This fit doesn't have to be their longest suit, and the hand will often play for more tricks if it isn't. As a matter of systemic agreement the opponents will often choose to play in an ...


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It's basically "out of bounds" to criticize anyone in public at bridge. This applies particularly to your opponents. Nor would anyone reasonably want to do so (other than for ego purposes) because it helps the opponents play better. Any criticism is best reserved for "in private." A partner has the right to express "reservations" about your play (or ...



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