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A lot depends on what the other bid is likely to mean, and whether other people bid beforehand (question doesn't say). For example 1H-? is different from 1D-1NT-2H-? or 1D-1H-DBL-PASS-? each of which might have a heart 4 or 5 card suit which otherwise could be bid. You might also want to consider whether to double to show values, pass and wait (you can ...


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You are essentially asking for statistics on the tactics chosen by expert players over the course of playing many games, correlated with the ease and perceived necessity of making their desired score in those games. While fascinating, i don't think you can find this out other than by asking experts directly for several reasons: stats of this kind are hard ...


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If you would like to "play" (that is, defend) in a suit that your opponents have bid, you make what is called a "trap pass." You know that you want to play in that suit, but your opponent doesn't know that for now. In essence, you have set a trap for him. Because you are doing this, you can't afford to tell your partner anything. If you and opener are "long ...


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Are you sure you want to play in that suit? Especially if your opponents open a major only if they hold a 5-card, you already know where 10 of the trumps are. Chances of a fit with your partner are slim and the length of that opponent can really hurt you. Consider remaining silent for the moment and double when they reach a manche. If you are really bent on ...


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You might want to play in that suit, but your partner is probably void and would really prefer some other suit. You've got two options here: 1) Sit in the bushes. Underbid your hand a bit, see if the opposition is willing to bid a serious contract. Double them at the last minute for a nice down score! 2) Bid your next-best suit. If there's a lot of ...


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Another advantage of ducking the first round is that it prevents the opponents from signaling to each other. Suppose you have Axx opposite Kxxxx, and you play the Ace, then the King, then another. One defender will win and his partner will discard; the discard will be a signal to help the winner know exactly what suit to play next. But if you begin right ...


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This is rather an extended comment than an answer. The TL;DR version is: there are no simple rules; you have to count your winners (and maybe also your potential losers) and make a plan for the hand first. It also depends on the bidding and on what opponents play to the first trick and what their lead and signalling conventions are. I misplayed the ...


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Much like many things in bridge, there is a rule of thumb for ducking. Assuming a 3NT contract, you can follow the Rule of Seven: Subtract from seven the total number of cards that declarer and dummy hold in the defenders' suit and duck their lead of the suit that many times. In your example (again, assuming a contract of 3NT), you should duck the ...


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In preference order your options are: If you have a singleton in Spades or Clubs with 4 or more hearts, jump in that denomination to show your support, strength, and short suit feature. This bid should be limited to 12-14 HCP, which your hand just fits into. Stronger hands with a singleton should probably take control with a cue bid. If you have 4 or more ...



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