Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

To answer the question, there are a lot of plastics that are suitable for use as card sleeves. None of them use Bisphenol-A as a plasticizer or monomer; that particular chemical is used primarily to make polycarbonates, which while optically clear are generally too stiff for use as flexible sheets or films (though they're great for applications requiring ...


8

There are a few situations where you want to consider sleeving your cards You want to prevent marking caused by uneven use (ever play Euchre with a normal deck of cards?) You want to prevent marking caused by tears, folds, scratches and nicks (especially in games with a lot of shuffling or playing cards repeatedly) You want to protect the value of the ...


6

Most card sleeves are made with Polypropylene (Type 5) which is unlikely to contain BPA. Plastic Containers Made with BPA Used in Food Preparation. Plastic containers have recycle codes on the bottom. Ingeneral,plastics that are marked with recycle codes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 are very unlikely to contain BPA. Some, but not all, plastics that are marked ...


6

My own experience is that, barring using a bag sealer on the sleeves, sleeving is not going to protect against direct spills nor large spills on a hard surface. On a surface that wicks moisture, an indirect spill will not get in. A direct spill (can knocked over onto cards, for example) will penetrate. I've seldom double sleeved, and will note that it's a ...


2

In the base game there is no building that interact with the materials, so, in this case, the answer is yes, you can remove them from the game safely. But in "Glory to Rome Promo Cards" set you have three buildings that do interact with the materials. Castra Praetoria, Solarium and Watch Post. For the first two cards the kind of interaction is not important ...


2

This is going to be largely based on the situation in both instances of single and double sleeve. The single sleeve will probably not protect if the open end is facing the spill and certainly will not if the spill completely surrounds the card. The double sleeve is going to be better at the directional spill but still cause you problems because it is not ...


1

Sleeves are good for games that have you shuffle a lot. Roborally, for example, shuffles a single deck of cards many times every game, and my cards were significantly worn after a year or two of playing occasionally. Similarly, if the cards just don't seem to be very durable, sleeves might be a good idea. They're usually mostly pointless for games that ...


1

As card sleeves are quite cheap, its just a matter of presonal preference. Some poeple like sleeves (I do) others dont (some of my friends). One case I could argue for sleeves is when you have a card game and plan on myabe buying an expansion later. The cards from the base set would be rugged from use, while the expansion would be pristine and shiny. It ...


1

As an alternative suggestion (considering the effort involved in effectively laminating your deck), I would suggest proxying your entire deck. A common printer can create an excellent facsimile of any card, and printing out a copy of your deck could be easier than making it vacuum-sealed. Then you'd get to play with your cards as, you know, cards. If ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible