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6

As was indicated by @JaysonSmith, a king can always be jumped by another king. This holds for any variant of draughts/checkers. The privileges that a king obtains differ by variant, however. backward movement: in all variants, kings can move backward, but men cannot. backward capture: in all variants, kings can jump backward, but men cannot for ...


5

It depends on if you are playing with mandatory capture rules or not. If you are playing with mandatory capture and they make a move instead of capturing a piece then you should tell them because they would be required to make the capture instead of another move. If you are not playing with mandatory capture then it doesn't matter but you can still tell them ...


5

This depends on the variation you're playing. A lot of variations allow capturing backwards with regular pieces (called men). The English variation is probably the most common that doesn't allow backwards capturing. By the international rules, capturing backwards is allowed (and mandatory if it results in the largest capture group). There's an extensive ...


4

(Warning: Clicking on the rulebook link below will download a Word document.) From the American Checkers Federation's official rulebook (emphasis mine): 1.16 When a man reaches the farthest row forward (known as the “king-row” or “crown-head”) it becomes a king, and this completes the turn of play. The man can be crowned by either player ( ) by placing ...


4

That is an optional rule called the Huffing Rule. Capturing pieces is compulsory. It is both players responsibility to make sure that is enforced.


3

Yes, a kinged-piece can certainly jump another kinged-piece. In fact, having a kinged-piece does NOT make it invulnerable to being 'jump'. This means that even a NON-kinged-piece can jump a kinged-piece. The only advantage to kinging a piece is that it is able to move both Forward and Backward. A non-kinged-piece can be severely limited in jumping due to ...


3

For American checkers on an 8x8 board, it is possible to get 24 kings on the board from the initial position. Here is a Java applet with a proof game of 211 moves. For International draughts on a 10x10 board, it is possible to get 40 kings on the board from the initial position. Here is a Java applet with a proof game of 389 moves.


3

No, on an 8x8 board and the regular American checkers rules, you can capture at most 9 out of the 12 pieces: The white king can capture here the sequence (in chess notation) h8 x f6 x h4 x f2 x d4 x b6 x d8 x f6 x d4 x b2 Note that the white king passes the squares f6 and d4 multiple times, which is allowed (what is not allowed, is jumping the same ...


3

Checkers is defintely not just tactics! While checkers is not in the same strategic league as chess, there are clear strategic concepts. For example, controlling the long diagonal is somewhat similar to the idea of controlling the centre in chess. Another example is playing to open one side, for the purposes of crowning pieces. This is analogous to the idea ...


2

No, the game does not become unplayable. Years ago, I regularly played without the forced capture rule, and found the experience enjoyable. There is also have the Huffing Rule variant, where the capture is not forced, but by not taking the capture you lose that piece after your turn.


2

If your opponent is remarkably cooperative, you could, theoretically, get 12 kings on the board for your color. Your opponent needs to open paths for you to get their back row in such a manner that you either do not get captured or can capture him on the way in. I've had as many 8 in a game a couple times playing against a very not good opponent.



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