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11

There was one very famous game, Spielmann vs. Tartakower, where Black kept his king in the center instead of castling, moved it forward on the 15th move, and again on the 21st move to reinforce his other pieces. Note, however, that these moves were made in the middle game, and not the opening. This game is actually unusual, because as another poster pointed ...


8

Castling is always an option - it is never forced upon a player. It is however a very commonly taken option as it: places the king in an easily defended position moves the rook towards the centre of the board where it is easily developed and does all that in one move, improving the player's tempo


7

You can promote a pawn to any piece (other than a Pawn or King), regardless of how many of that piece is on the board. In theory, you could have nine Queens by the end of the game (unlikely, of course). Piece availability is not a concern, either. An upside-down rook (if available) is the recommended stand-in for a queen, though you may have to improvise ...


7

There is no ELO rating in go. And even no official international rating at all. A common question in go forums is "how does my rating in [whatever country or online server] compare with [other country or online server]". The European Go Federation is maintaining an international rating system where Ke Jie is rated 2956. goratings.org is an individual ...


6

One of the following is true: There is a dominant strategy for White. There is a dominant strategy for Black. There are strategies for both players that guarantee they don't lose, i.e. perfect play results in a draw (e.g. as in Tic-Tac-Toe). No one knows which is true. Most experts guess that perfect play leads to a draw, and a few believe White can ...


6

This is a bad idea in the early game. You already mentioned the greatest issue. Your king is open to attack. Not only attack but it makes it easier to land absolute pins, forks, and skewers which will cost pieces. If we could keep it safe, it's not useful. The king cannot directly attack a piece. It needs to spend two moves, one to get aside a piece ...


6

No, you may not ever move your king into a position in which it is threatened ("in check"). If you did, your opponent could just immediately capture your king, and you would lose. Reference from the FIDE Laws of Chess: 3.9. ... No piece can be moved that will either expose the king of the same colour to check or leave that king in check.


6

Per the wikipedia page for castling, it appears that castling arose in response to the growth in the power of the bishop and queen move sets. The line that is most interesting is a reference to the Gottingen Manuscript: In the Göttingen manuscript (c. 1500) and a game published by Luis Ramírez de Lucena in 1498, castling consisted of two moves: first the ...


5

Fool's mate is the quickest way to mate, not win. Technically the fastest way to win is for your opponent to resign on the first move or for them to lose on time (e.g. not show up but their clock is running).


5

One important reason to check a king is to prevent him from castling later by forcing him to move. The reason is that a king that has already moved (and remains in the center) cannot later "castle" his way into relative safety on the side. Nor can a king castle while in check, so this prevents him from castling for at least that move. There are two other ...


4

You can solve any such problem by pretending the rules of check and checkmate don't exist, and instead you just lose when your king is captured. In your case, if you take the pawn, black will take your king and you will lose. The rule of check becomes unnecessary since all it says is you can't make a move that allows your opponent to win immediately, and ...


4

Ok, going for official rules here : When a player, having the move, plays a pawn to the rank furthest from its starting position, he must exchange that pawn as part of the same move for a new queen, rook, bishop or knight of the same colour on the intended square of arrival. This is called the square of ‘promotion’. The player's choice is not ...


3

This is very rare. Such a attack with the king in the middlegame (forget about the opening) is known as a "king walk", or a "winning king walk" if it wins. There has been a lot of discussion on this in the past in Dutch, so searching for "winnende wandelkoning" gives some examples. The most famous example is Short - Timman, Tilburg 1991. Black was so ...


3

Not only do bridge players retain their abilities to a later age than Chess and Go players, they don't even attain their peak ability until an age, around forty or so, when they have decidedly passed their peak in Go and Chess. Bob Hamman, born 1938, was ranked 7th in the world by the World Bridge Federation as of October, 2012, at the age of 74. His ...


3

The ELO system, as it was originally designed, has a mean of 1500 and a standard deviation of 400 points. The central limit theorem defines how many people can exist by this model depending on their distance from the mean. For example, a rating of 3100 is 4 standard deviations from the mean (1500 + 4 x 400 = 3100). According the central limit theorem there ...


3

There are three determining factors for how high the highest Elo rating for a given game will be: Internal aspects of the rating system: First an foremost how the ratings are initialised. If you start out with everybody getting a rating of 2000, the numbers will stay higher than if everybody gets 1800. But also K-factor (how strong ratings fluctuate) and ...


2

A "third" handicap other than material or time is a "propositional" game. An example is that you lose (or cannot win) if you have lost all your pawns before administering checkmate, no matter what else happens. That proposition would lead you to play out your pawns more conservatively at the beginning of the game, and perhaps not use pawn storms. Other ...


2

Try something new. A new opening, or relying overmuch on an unusual piece. This works best when the junior opponent knows how to play and is getting the hang of your usual opening, but you are still better. Try something wild and new, it might be a disaster, it might actually work, either way you might both learn something. PS - Especially fun in ...


2

There are a few handicap ideas I use: Material Advantage Time Advantage Swapping colors midway through the game Material Advantage: Depends on the difference in skill of the two players. For beginners playing against moderately good players, you can take off whole pieces such as Queens, or Knights (since Knights are notoriously good against beginners ...


2

There is no obvious answer from what research I have done. It was very likely added simply to make the game more interesting. The en passant rule was then added to make it harder to use the two space rule to avoid getting captured.


2

The reason is history. At some point in history (between 1200 and 1500 AD in Europe when the old game of Shatranj evolved into Modern Chess), there was a lots of experimenting with different rules in chess, and the double move of the pawn made the game more dynamic and pleasant for the Chess players, therefore it stayed.


2

If you have two games each of which ranks players using the ELO rating system, then the game with higher rankings is generally viewed as "more complex" than the game with lower rankings. In the sense that there are more discrete levels of learning to mastery. It is not clear to me which ranking systems are being used in your statement, but for the ...


2

I don't have an understanding of Go ratings, but I think you are comparing apples with oranges, i.e. Go elo ratings are not meant to be compared to Chess elo ratings. This quote is from comparison of go rank with chess rating It's not really possible. You could use the European GoR system to give a rough comparison, but the problem is that it's not ...


2

At first this seemed very infeasible to me. You would need a 3 second timer for every piece. You need a way to prevent simultaneous claims of single board spaces. After giving it some thought, I came up with a possible implementation. You would need a board with a socket for each square. When a piece is inserted into this socket, it is held in place by ...


1

I don't know anything about Bridge, I played a bit Chess and am a regular Go player. That being said, I completely agree with Arghya's answer and want to add some details from my perspective. I think that Go is evolving through time. As chess. These games have Complete Information (see Wikipedia's article about Game Theory) and still are not difficult to ...


1

Taking the pawn places your king in check, under threat from the opponent king. As white, you have no way of creating check on your opponent, let alone mate. White loses.


1

The thing is : some chess programs have a way to compute if the player have made a brilliant move or a blunder. The program I use (Fritz 12) does it with post-game analysis sometimes, so you have to have quite a powerful engine if you want to have this kind of annotations. But I think it's more a front-end kind of stuff : you won't see the engine doing this ...


1

No - there isn't a way to auto-annotate for all moves. Strong players often disagree on how to annotate moves using these symbols, particularly when the move is a non-forcing, non-tactical move. I'm not a programmer by any means, but your approach of looking at changes in the effective score is how engines point out blunders, e.g. a significant drop is ...


1

The best training for playing chess is the game itself. But if you want to "dumb down" the game, then remove the two sets of knights. Those are the pieces with "special" moves that are relatively hard to understand. The other pieces all move on straight lines and/or diagonals. There's really no need to play with simplified rules. There are only five ...


1

Bullet: one minute per player for all moves Blitz: 5 minutes per player for all moves Quickplay: 20, 30 or 40 minutes per player for all moves Quick tournament: 1 hour 30 mins to reach move 35, then 30 mins to finish (per player) FIDE tournament: 1 hour 30 minutes to reach move 40, then 30 mins to finish, plus 30 seconds per move (per player) Slow ...



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