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6

Per the wikipedia page for castling, it appears that castling arose in response to the growth in the power of the bishop and queen move sets. The line that is most interesting is a reference to the Gottingen Manuscript: In the Göttingen manuscript (c. 1500) and a game published by Luis Ramírez de Lucena in 1498, castling consisted of two moves: first the ...


5

One important reason to check a king is to prevent him from castling later by forcing him to move. The reason is that a king that has already moved (and remains in the center) cannot later "castle" his way into relative safety on the side. Nor can a king castle while in check, so this prevents him from castling for at least that move. There are two other ...


-1

En passant captures are allowed only against a pawn that has advanced two spaces on its first move. A unit that marched at "double time" like this would probably rest after half the journey, then resume its march to the destination. This is true when your pawn is on the "fifth" rank (e.g. you have a black pawn on d5), and an adjacent pawn has moved from say, ...


2

At first this seemed very infeasible to me. You would need a 3 second timer for every piece. You need a way to prevent simultaneous claims of single board spaces. After giving it some thought, I came up with a possible implementation. You would need a board with a socket for each square. When a piece is inserted into this socket, it is held in place by ...



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