Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

You should almost always make suggestions that include one or two cards in your hand, especially after you know one or two of the real murder components. (Though this might change with the number of players. I'm used to playing with 3 or 4 people.) The end goal isn't to know who holds which cards, it's to know which cards are not held. The most efficient ...


8

I don't think your general guideline of 50% certain is accurate. When you make an accusation is more dependent upon how much your opponents know, and how likely you are going to be able to make another useful suspicion before the end of the game. BTW, there aren't that may possibilities for certainty at which you would make an accusation: 100% - Deduced ...


7

Case 1: No, you must stop movement upon entering a room. Rules for Moving - If you enter a Room, STOP MOVING. Case 2: Yes, the pool is a room. Someone contacted the designer, Rob Daviau, and he confirmed this. He also notes that using this power only happens during the move phase instead of rolling. (I.e. You cannot start a rumor in another room, then ...


4

The card game preserves all the same important features present in the board game. All the deductive elements are still present, and the core gameplay is still the same - each player has cards which they reveal as you make accusations. There are small thematic differences. Instead of the murder in the house, you are on the trail of the murderer. Room, ...


4

I am not sure if anyone has actually used math to calculate the optimal strategy. That would of course require the correct play strategy for the camera strategy to really be the "optimal". This person has a thorough explanation of a strategy including the why. http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/598248/pretty-hard-to-beat-4-player-setup


3

In general, you should probably only do so before everyone else could deduce that you have it. For example, lets say that previously you disproved Col. Mustard, Candlestick, and Study. At some later point, you could not disprove Col. Mustard, Revolver, and Study. Your opponents should know at this point you have Candlestick in your hand. If you choose to ...


1

Clue: The Card Game uses the same characters as the U.S. version of Clue: Colonel Mustard, Miss Scarlet, Professor Plum, Mr. Green, Mrs. White, and Mrs. Peacock. In some ways, it's even more fun than the board game. There's a Cluedo card game, too, but I can't personally vouch for it.


1

The player who reveals his card always learns a little less than everyone else. This is because everyone else learns that he has one of the suggested cards, but the revealer already knew that. In the normal rules, the next player to act is also more frequently the player who reveals a card. If you reversed the suggestion order, this disadvantage would go ...


1

One variant I've played is to make suggestions to a specific opponent. That opponent is then first to either show you a card or say they have no matching cards, and it then proceeds clockwise from there, until either one of your opponents shows you a card or noone does. This allows a bit more strategy in that you can tailor questions for specific ...


1

It makes a subtle difference, in that, to prove you wrong, they have to reveal a card in your proposed solution. If you (Ay) say Col M in the Kitchen with the Pipe, and the next player (Bee) has Col M, the one after (See) has Kitchen and Pipe, you don't find out that See has kitchen or pipe; you only know that Bee has the Col M card. To find out if Kitchen ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible