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14

In my experience, the order in which you introduce games is only of minor importance in comparison with understanding what kind of person you're dealing with and what games that type of person would like. So the key is introducing different types of games to identify the gaming personality type. Here are a few gaming personality types I've run across, and ...


10

Instead of going on to list one game after another I'll try to find some common points to help you out. I'd say there are three main factors in what might put off less hard-core gamers: Upfront intimidation (should resolve during first game) Continuous complexity (remains an issue indefinitely) "Obscure effects" (should resolve after one or two games) ...


6

Technology has helped me convert/graduate more players than any other tool that I have used. Consider Dominion: this game is very easy to play online. You click on cards that are in bold and then you click "end turn". Notice that arbitrary button-pressing will probably never lead to a victory, but that the game mechanics can be easily learned since the ...


4

When I introduce friends of mine to games, I find that the most important thing is the time cost. People are unwilling to even try games that will take up hours of their lives. As far as I'm concerned, the number one gateway game is Dominion. Others have mentioned it already, but I'll give you a couple of reasons why I love to cajole non-gamer friends to try ...


4

I find the main factor that affects game introduction is the learning curve. Even if people enjoy playing new games, they generally don't enjoy actually learning them. The longer the interval between "Hey, would you like to play a new game?" and "Okay, we're ready to play.", the less likely any novice gamer is to stick around. Even if they do survive the ...


2

Don't forget the most important thing about teaching new players games. Know the game, you're going to play, well!!! It is crucial that someone knows the rules well and can explain and answer questions fast to get some kind of flow. If you want to try a brand new game, pick it up the day before and read the rules. Maybe set the board and play around or watch ...


1

The new web-show TableTop is pretty much explicitly designed with this kind of thing in mind. As of this writing only one episode is out, covering Small World. Note that there is a little bit of cursing, but the F-bomb is bleeped, so you may want to consider pre-watching the show if you are considering using it to convince your kids to play...


1

I've found Pandemic to be a great gateway game to get people interested in board games in general. Then, once they're hooked, games like Dominion and Agricola are good because can be started simple and then gradually increased in complexity by adding more bits of the game into the mix.


1

Civilization (or Advanced Civilization). It takes at least 30 min just to explain the framework of the rules. Then more time to explain all the details of the different advanced and calamities if you want to explain those upfront. (I usually leave those until later). And it can take many hours to play a complete game. The Advanced version actually is ...


1

Axis & Allies The 30mins+ Axis & Allies takes to set up the hundreds of peices would switch most people off - even before you get into the convoluted turn process and thick rule book.


1

Agricola My first and only game of Agricola involved about 30 minutes of setup and explanation before we got going. It took a few turns to get the hang of it, and I think that's got to be on the short side of average. I have two things going for me: I'm probably more of a "hard-core" gamer than it sounds like your friends are. I've played several games ...



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