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15

You have several options if you want to collect a large set of generic components so that you can throw your own prototype together. Thrift Store games you buy just for the components If you frequent thrift stores regularly, you can pick up cheap games ($2-$4 usually) specifially just to harvest the components from them. Some good examples from the list ...


14

From the manufacturing standpoint, a few thousand years ago it was easier to produce stones that were convex on both sides. Before the Tang dynasty, because of this, all the stones were convex on both sides (just like ishi stones). During the Ming dynasty, crafting skills progressed and stones could be shaped with 1 flat side and 1 convex (good for ...


13

Board Game Bits has little wooden disks in various sizes. You could get some cheap plastic pirate coins you can get at pirate stores. This might help spice things up also. There is also a company out of Australia, Campaign Coins, that specializes in coinage useful for games and LARPs. They're prices are a little steep at $7 for ten coins, but they have a ...


12

Here's what I did, and they don't look bad. Used a towel to pat dry the tiles. Used my fingers to press out the wrinkles and squish the expanding cardboard back together. Laid them down between two towels, put a textbook on top, and pressed down to get some more water out. Pressed out the wrinkles and squish cardboard together again. Laid them down between ...


11

This is a common complaint. The sliders are just too big. Solutions that have worked for others include: Using an alternative print-out, with washers for tracking Wrapping each side of the character card with sticky tape, for thickness Laminating the cards Applying some PVA glue inside the sliders, and letting it dry before use


11

Customer Service at Rio Grande Games will replace pieces for a fee upon request. I ended up with a set second hand that was missing a tile, and they sent it to me. I'm not sure how cost effective it would be if a lot of tiles are damaged though, compared to getting a new set.


5

Manners dictate the clumsy culprit should buy you a new set. Beyond that, you can laminate the tiles. That said, you have to see this from a cost-to-benefit perspective. Unless this particular set is dear to you, I would buy another one. Especially since laminating the damaged tiles also means laminating all of them; you don't want to make damaged tiles ...


5

The sad answer is that the only real shot you have at saving wet die-cut cardboard counters is when they're still wet, as far as I know. If you immediately put them on a tray, or in a plastic box (if in layers, separate the layers with wax paper), and put them in a very cold freezer and leave them there for a long time (i.e. weeks or months), then the water ...


4

I use the mobile apps, they not only keep track of stats but help with the haunt scenarios. Here is the link for IOS and another for Android. I have only used the IOS one but it works well


4

As the question notes, Poker Chips in place of money is quite viable. I don't remove the money, just leave it bagged in the box. Gaming stones or poker chips can be used to track victory points as well. On some sports games, counters or standups are replaced with meeples or minis readily. I've found that meeples fit beautifully on the Crash Tackle board, ...


4

You're in luck. Fantasy Flight Games sells sets like this in a variety of colors. Another possible source is your local craft store. Not sure if they have these in your area, but Michael's and Hobby Lobby(slightly better selection) are worth checking out. There's usually an aisle devoted to wood crafts. You can usually find lots of nice inexpensive ...


4

I got real gold doubloons from The Great American Coin Co. They are about the size of a nickel, and are authentic looking, real metal coins based on the 17th century Spanish doubloon. They make the game so much more fun! http://www.greatamericancoincompany.com/c5/Shiny-Gold-Doubloon-Replicas-You-Choose-Quantity-p184.html


4

You can look at what the Cheapass games come with and what they suggest you borrow from other games. Typically they assume players have: Dice Pawns / meeples / etc Counters such as coins / beads / etc Pen and paper A stack of paper money


3

I got some really nice doubloon coins from Momcorp. They're a lot more enjoyable than the paper coins, and a pretty good deal for $29 -- you get 50 coins (40 small silver coins & 10 large gold coins). http://momcorp.com/moms-famous-antique-doubloons/


3

I have a solution that has worked out great for us. We colored coded the items from each set using colored markers on the thin white side edge of each of the hexes, board pieces, etc based on the set with which it had arrived. We used light pastel markers, the effect is not noticable during standard game play but makes it incredibly easy to group cards at ...


2

I don't know where you can find scans to download and print, but you can use BGG to help out with things: Full component list (with card names, but not full card text) 2013 Spare Parts Resource List entry for the game - He could post his wants there after seeing what is missing Image gallery for the game (15 pages of images, there might be images of the ...


2

Make copies of the map (it's expressly authorized) but you'll find most folks won't write on them. The pattern I see in both home and tournament play is that during adjudication everyone will write down the units they have down the left side of what will become their order sheet. During negotiations they'll consult their list and look at the map, often ...


2

We had good success using sticky tape, but we put it on the sliders. Specifically, we stuck a piece of single sided tape on the inside of the slider, and then trimmed the excess tape off with small scissors. We might try packing tape next time because it's a wee bit thicker. An advantage to this solution is that it doesn't mess up the character tiles.


2

I would just write down how much of what you need in each box and use that as a check list. If you remember what the pieces are called, a list is easier to make and doesn't require printing. Separating how many times of each tile goes in the Seafarers box and the base game box is a hassle. I've already put a list of components in my 5-6 player boxes for ...


1

I realize this is an older post but I found it to be a good resource and had a resource I thought was useful so I thought I'd add a little to it. Similar to the Thrift store answer, in the states we have Dollar Tree stores, where everything is one dollar. I've seen chess/checkers/dominoes/etc. all of which have a number of pawns or tokens for use. I ...


1

Another UK source, especially for any quantity, that I've used in the past is Plastics For Games Ltd. (Not used them for years so I've no idea if their service is as good as it was, but their site is still active). Note they do have a minimum order of £100.


1

To flatten the hexes themselves, stack them and bind them tightly with rubber bands in all 3 directions across the six sides. To avoid the problem of the warped hexes entirely: get a sheet of clear acrylic that is big enough to cover the whole board and border. You could cut it to fit, cut it to fit and in halves for portability, or leave it ...


1

Without parameters on shape, size, and cost, it's difficult to give a good answer. However, if it were my game and I needed 4-5 6-slot horizontal card slots, I would consider making them out of folded cardboard. With a little trial and error it should be simple to shape what you need from 7x3 (21) horizontal folds, and 3 vertical folds with 2-4 tabs to ...


1

I used an iron set to Cotten. Placed on a granite counter. Pressed back, then front. I pressed hard and straight down leaving the iron in contact for a good five seconds. Could do three to four at a time. Wiped moisture off counter with paper towel as I went along. Took a few cycles on the wettest tiles. Left flat on counter over night. The iron did ...



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