Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

If the "board game map" is subject to copyright restrictions, then it is protected for 70 years in the USA. As a general rule, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. For an anonymous work, a pseudonymous work, or a work made for hire, the copyright endures for a term of ...


6

Fundamentally, the OGL exists to (1) allow D&D 3.0 supplements to be made by 3rd parties and (2) to ensure the 3.0 Dev Team could take their mechanics with them if they got fired. (1) can be seen in the explosion of material in 2000-2002.(2) can be seen clearly in Pathfinder and Arcana Unearthed. While mechanics can't be copyrighted, and the US Patent ...


4

As previously pointed out, just because a copyright holder has stopped producing a game doesn't mean they stop owning it. GW still own the rights (unless they have sold them; you could write and ask them if this is more than curiosity). Games are usually covered by copyright in the rules, characters and concepts though there may be patents on mechanics; ...


3

The in/out of print status has no bearing on ownership of copyright for a work. Since you modified the question to be about the UK, the governing authority is the Intellectual Property Office. IANAL, this does not constitute legal advice. The term of protection or duration of copyright varies depending on the type of copyright work. The term of ...


3

Currently in the US its 90 to 120 years or life of the author plus 70. US lawmakers keep extending the copyright so that Mickey Mouse doesn't go into the public domain. So anything printed in your life time won't be available in the public domain for a long time if you live in the US. The copyright owners can release it earlier, but you'd have to contact ...


3

This is meant as a response to Chad, but the comment field wouldn't hold it all: @Chad I am not a lawyer, but I have done a bit of reading on copyright and this does not seem right to me. It would be hard (not impossible) to patent a traditional board game, though some modern ones can involve some patented technology. While it is strictly true that game ...


2

In France, something drawn usually falls under the `droits d'auteur' (author rights) laws which protect one's creation 70 years after his death.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible