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20

First off, taken one way this might be an unanswerable question I'm struggling with the question. It seems to be asking folks to guess on what they think the rationale might have been for scoring 4-card runs as 4-points instead of 6 (or some other number); however, since the game was invented in the 17th century its inventor is long-since dead, and absent ...


13

Having spent some time trying to work out probabilities and carrying out some research, I have come up with a few conclusions. Almost NEVER lead with a 5 or a 10. There are 16 cards that value 10 in the pack (30%), so playing a 5 gives a very high probability that the other player will get 2points for 15. Same theory for leading with a 10. Although far ...


13

That is for the Game Peg (also known as a spilikin). At the bottom of the board, you see the three straight stripes - those are for keeping track of the number of games you have won. Until you have actually won a game, your spilikin for tracking wins is stored in that third hole. Consider the following picture: it appears blue has just won the game, and is ...


12

Nobs is counted separately. It will always be one extra point if it is in your hand or in the crib. Likewise, nibs (if a jack is cut for the dealer) is always two points, and the dealer still gets to count the jack for a flush if the suit matches. Rules of Cribbage.


10

19-back is a not uncommon cribbage variant, but is often unpopular. I've seen it in some editions of Hoyle's Card Games; I've had 3 editions, read a fourth, and 2 of them had it. Unfortunately, my copies are not available to check exact wordings at the moment. Typically: If your hand scores no points in count phase, you lose 19 points. Note that this ...


8

The Cribbage Statistics page answers this question, 78 for the dealer (hand + pegged + crib) The maximum number of points that can be scored in a single deal by the dealer in a two player game is 78 (pegging + hand + crib): Non-dealer is dealt 3 3 4 4 5 J and Dealer is dealt 3 3 4 4 5 5. Non-dealer discards J 5 to the crib (as ill-advised as ...


7

No. According to the rules of cribbage: Card combinations cannot span a reset; once the total reaches 31 (or a Go has been scored) and counting has re-started at zero, cards already played cannot contribute to runs or pairs.


7

If you scroll down to "Pegging Maximal Score", they outline how the dealer can peg 30 points. I found that page from an answer to the question that you linked above... not sure how you missed that! Added: Joe O'Brien showed, that dealer can score 30 points (not 26 points as we stated before with a dealer's hand 4,4,4,7, pone's hand 4,8,10,K, and the ...


6

Short answer: There is no such rule in cribbage and your friend owes you a drink (and 120 pts in your next game) Even among variants of the game, I've never heard of this rule. The closest I could come is a variation where in order to win you must peg out exactly. But even then, Go's are allowed (and encouraged as it's amazingly difficult to get a 1 ...


6

Aces are low in cribbage. Their point value is one in pegging and in adding up to 15 during pegging, in the hand, or in the crib. The American Cribbage Congress' Rules of Cribbage define a straight as "a sequence of three or more consecutive cards", and the card order is shown with King as the highest descending normally through Ace as the lowest. I've ...


6

The first of a pair, or the middle card of a run The key strategy to take away is that in the play you're trying to trap or entice the other player into playing something that might give them points but sets you up to get more, or you're trying to increase the number of cards they can play that will enable you to respond with a scoring play. For example: ...


6

First of all, there's only one fifteen: the seven and the eight. That's two points. (Note that the sixes can't participate in 15s at all) Next, there are three runs of three: each six in turn, the seven, and the eight. That's 3*3 = nine points. Finally, there's the trio of sixes, worth six points (or equivalently, three pairs of sixes). So the final ...


5

I'm pretty sure the 'optimal' play is neither of the ones you mentioned! Keeping 4,5,6,Q counts 7, gives you essentially equal opportunity for another 2 points off of any face card (you lose out on four extra points if one of the other two Qs comes, but that's only a 1 in 7 chance), still earns you all but two of the points you'd have had from 3,4,5,6 if ...


5

So using some statistics, lets see what happens! Keeping 45QQ is the best chance if you want to keep the pair. Aces(4): +2; Twos(4): +0; Threes(3): +3; Fours(3): +2; Fives(3): +6; Sixes(3): +5; Sevens(4): +0; Eights(4): +0; Nines(4): +0; Tens(4): +2; Jacks(4): +2; Queens(2): +6; Kings(4): +2. There are 46 cards left that could be cut from, 30 of them give ...


5

You have three A's, let's call them AC, AS, AH (no diamond), and two 7's, let's say 7C and 7S. First, you have 6 points in 15s: 7C/7S/AC, 7C/7S/AS and 7C/7S/AH. You have no runs or double runs. Next, you have 6 points in Ace pairs: AC/AS, AC/AH, and AC/AH (also known as a Pair Royal). Next, you have 2 points in Seven pairs: 7C/7S. You have no flushes. You ...


5

"Go" is when the count is less than 31 and the player whose turn it is to play has no legal plays (all cards remaining would put the count over 31). That player says "Go", the other person scores one point, and then plays any remaining cards in their hand (without going over 31). The explanation at cribbage.org from rule 1.5.e.2 ... Players ...


5

It's fine to go over in standard cribbage; the game is won by the first player or partnership to reach or exceed 121 points. But remember the way things are scored: as they happen. If that three points you mention was in play, such as opponent leads a 9, you play a 5, opponent plays a 6, and you play a 7, scoring three for the run in play, then the go from ...


5

I've played literally hundreds of AI's... the strongest opponent cribbage games are all cheating. The core Issues Cribbage is focused upon 3 key priorities: maximize points in hand maximize points in play minimize risk of giving points in the crib. These boil down to two key skills: Keeping Playing Playing is governed by a fairly easily coded set ...


4

You get 1 point if your opponent cannot "go" because the count is too high The official rules of cribbage describe the general turn order of a cribbage hand. During the count phase, each player lays down a card in turn, adding to a monotonically increasing score. Upon their turn, if a player does not have a card in their hand that they can play without ...


4

According to the American Cribbage Congress rules there is no specification as to HOW you score your hand but the score must be said in a way that is understood by your opponent and that they accept the total. From http://www.cribbage.org/rules/rule9.asp Rule 9.2. Order Of Counting The counting and pegging of the hands and crib shall be done in the ...


4

Not to be trite, but the score is the score! Announcing point contributions from the various categories (runs, pairs, same suit, correct Jack, etc.) should suffice. Note: this is what you have called "shorthand". Of course, this all depends on the level of play. If I'm teaching the game to a new player, I would go as far as to count (the first example) as ...


4

This is not a common variation that I have heard of, and research on multiple cribbage sources seems to agree that Knobs (starter hand jacks) are always 1 point and heels (or flipped/dealer jacks) are 2 points. This may very well be a case of a small player group misunderstanding or altering the rules. Rules for games like cribbage can often be changed in ...


3

I'll try to answer the two first questions : What else do I need to think about/test to call this game final? Try to keep it simple. The more complicated your rules are, the less entertaining it will be. Remember this famous phrase about poker : "It takes five minutes to learn, but a lifetime to master." Generally this can be applied to every popular ...


2

Whomever calls it scores it. The rules at American Cribbage Congress do not address muggins outside of 2 player, but the wording requires that it be called before pegging it. Since, in 3 player, there is a dealer, a pone, and another pone, it's simplest to let whomever caught it score it. Further, in 30 years of playing cribbage, in both 3 and 4 hand, ...


2

No - cards from one round of play cannot be combined with cards from the next. From http://www.bicyclecards.ca/game-rules/cribbage/85.php?page_id=32 The player who called Go leads for the next series of plays, with the count starting at zero. The lead may not be combined with any cards previously played to form a scoring combination; the Go has ...


2

Indeed, I've heard much the same. Turns out, it is merely a "common" house-rule. There's no mention of any such limitation in any of the rules I've been able to find, but some people definitely play that way. It seems to me that in Crib (even more so than in many other games) it's important to know what the house rules are before you start.


2

Here is a web page that you can use to score any cribbage hand: http://www.bucktheodds.com/cribbage/score And, here is your specific hand http://www.bucktheodds.com/cribbage/score?cardsText=1D,1H,1S,7D,7S The page is really cool because it shows a list of all scoring combinations: Scoring Details 15 Count 1H,7S,7D 6 1S,7S,7D ...


1

Here is a web page that you can use to score any cribbage hand: http://www.bucktheodds.com/cribbage/score And, here is your specific hand http://www.bucktheodds.com/cribbage/score?cardsText=6S,6D,6H,7S,8D The page is really cool because it shows a list of all scoring combinations: Scoring Details 15 Count 7S,8D 2 Pairs 6H,6S,6D 6 ...


1

The non-dealer leads the play for each hand. If either player is unable to play a card without breaking 31, he calls "Go" after which the opposing player plays any other cards in his hand that are playable. The player who called "Go" then leads the next play, starting at zero. During the show, when the hands are scored, the non-dealer also leads. During ...


1

My father, a patient loving man, taught me cribbage at an early age pre teen... He would share strategies and odds, even when I was much older... I dare say that our family lived by this rule. Although I never heard of playing where it doesn't apply to the crib... then again never met anyone that even knew of the rule or way of playing (excluding family of ...



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