Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Board Game Bits has little wooden disks in various sizes. You could get some cheap plastic pirate coins you can get at pirate stores. This might help spice things up also. There is also a company out of Australia, Campaign Coins, that specializes in coinage useful for games and LARPs. They're prices are a little steep at $7 for ten coins, but they have a ...


9

Yes, you can buy blank hex pieces. Print&Play Productions offers cardboard hex tiles in several different sizes through Boards & Bits. Chipboard Shapes - Hex 1.19" [35 pcs] $2.00 Chipboard Shapes - Hex 1.5" [20 pcs] $2.00 Chipboard Shapes - Hex 2.2" [11 pcs] $2.00 Chipboard Shapes - Hex 2.6" [22 pcs] $3.00 Chipboard Shapes - Hex 3.9" [8 pcs] ...


9

I've mentally lost track of big meeples before, so I don't see a problem with visually altering it to make it stand out. Perhaps you could borrow a hat from a set of Legos? Honestly, I'm more surprised that your gaming group is cutthroat enough to need a rule to force people to announce when using big meeples. Carcassonne is a game of perfect information ...


8

You are not visually impaired. Telling at a glance whether one thing is bigger than another, when they are not immediately next to each other, can be fairly difficult. I have never played Carcassonne with the big meeple, but I've noticed this problem in other games, such as distinguishing medium and large Icehouse pieces in certain circumstances. My ...


7

I've printed decks to playtest with friends before buying the actual cards. I just went to a local print shop. Everywhere has one. I didn't bother printing backs. I just sleeved the cards. For rigidity, I backed them with real cards or those silly advertisement cards you get in booster packs. As long as you do that for every card in the deck, it should ...


7

at least 110# card, probably not above 200# card. 110# is thicker than my playing cards, as an FYI. I've used it for quite shuffleable cards for playtest games. Once you get past 200# stock, you're into stuff too stiff for comfortable shuffling. A high rag content is good, as well, as it's more resilient than pure wood-pulp stocks. High clay content is ...


7

My first instinct was that Mark Rosewater, the head of Magic R&D and the writer of the weekly column "Making Magic" on the official site, must have written a definitive account of the Magic colour pie. And with ~50 columns a year under his belt for the past decade or so, I'm sure he's written a million things on subject, especially as the colour pie is ...


5

If you have access to a die-cutting press, as many teachers might, one can buy a hexagon press die. Google Sizzix/Westminster Bigz Dies Hexagon and you find several sizes. They make a block of 6x 3/4" and 1" hexes (suitable for counters), and one of 4x 2" hexes, and one which does 2.5" hexes. Check your local craft stores and school supply stores. The ...


5

Best is a factor of both cost and volume. If you're like most hobby board game prototypers, then you're looking for a low cost solution, and you'll be making only a handful of tiles. For this, the manual process is best. This involves buying cardboard of the appropriate weight, printing your tiles with an inkjet printer, gluing the paper to the cardboard, ...


5

SpeilMaterial has a lot of options if painting the head in silver or something isn't enough Cowboys (might have to paint yourself) & dwarfs for example.


5

Edit: It appears that the manufacturer has decided that it was economically unfeasible to release the new base cards. Todd Rowland, one of the Game Designers/Publishers, has confirmed that the base cards in the episode were made by AEG (the publisher), and will be made available later this year: No we made them, and we've made them for AL9K and Cthulhu ...


4

A simple solution if you are willing and able to spend some money: Buy another copy of the game, a foam paint brush, and a small container of white paint. Using the foam brush you can paint a nice, even, thin coat of white paint over the face of the cards and use a black permanent marker when they dry to write whatever your heart desires!


4

in the meantime you can use these printable ones :) http://boardgamegeek.com/filepage/91736/smash-up-base-mats


4

I got real gold doubloons from The Great American Coin Co. They are about the size of a nickel, and are authentic looking, real metal coins based on the 17th century Spanish doubloon. They make the game so much more fun! http://www.greatamericancoincompany.com/c5/Shiny-Gold-Doubloon-Replicas-You-Choose-Quantity-p184.html


4

I never thought of this as a problem, but always as a deliberate feature - sometimes it's possible to slip a Big Meeple into a city without drawing attention to it. "Okay, so I finish the city and I get the points, because I have two workers to your one." "Actually... you might want to look at my guy again..." I'm aware that some groups' sense of ...


4

Now i had envisioned that every floor which has 10 spaces each would have a even number of tiles regardless of them being good,bad or special but once i divided the total number of tiles which is 88 with 20 the number of floors i got 4.4. Its logically impossible to have 4.4 tiles on each floor. How can i solve this problem. Have a different number of ...


3

I would suggest that if you wanted to do something simple to make the big meeple stand out, that doesn't cost a thing, juts make a house rule to play it on it's head or some other similarly different position.


3

I got some really nice doubloon coins from Momcorp. They're a lot more enjoyable than the paper coins, and a pretty good deal for $29 -- you get 50 coins (40 small silver coins & 10 large gold coins). http://momcorp.com/moms-famous-antique-doubloons/


3

Best bet for multiple "3d" sets: 3-D Print off a master of each type, then use resin casting to make as many as you need. Or use a single type, and print circular labels that go inside a recess. As for bubble removal - an insulin syringe. that microfine needle barely leaves a mark, and can suck half a cc of air out. It's better, however, to not get ...


3

Could you not use a standard deck of cards, paste paper printouts on them, and then sleeve all the cards?


3

Quilters and schools often use die-cutters to make shaped pieces. Hexagons are one of the standard die types, and are available in a variety of sizes. Many cut multiples at once, tho the standard sized template is a 5x8" block with 1 large, or 2, 4, or 6 hexagons of smaller sizes (3", 2", 1" face to face) Search for Hexagon die cut to find more variety than ...


2

I created templates for printing on the 'Spare cards' that come with the expansion packs. I then bought Avery Crystal Clear labels (L7784)and used a laser printer to print them out. I cut them to size then applied them to the blanks and they look and feel almost identical to the Originals.


2

There are site that do the work for you like custom cards against humanity


2

Crabs Adjust Humidity is a 3rd party expansion pack, they offer packs of just blank cards which are almost identical to the original cards if you don't have enough blank cards in the expansions to write your own cards on. I have ordered about 8 of these now and just keep on expanding my own deck.


2

Try this site , they can produce a lot of material for board game and after you can even use their online store for the distribution. https://www.thegamecrafter.com/


1

A friend of mine got some Mexico pesos. They seem to work fairly good, and are fairly heavy. Different sizes as well. How you get them if you don't have a friend traveling there, I'm not sure. But I wouldn't be surprised if they aren't a cheap option for metal money. ...


1

If you're looking to get the correct thickness for the cards, ask the print shop to print them on 14-point paper, or whatever they have in stock that requires a printer drum to have a rating of just over 300 psi. Through some experimentation at my job and a bit of research, I've discovered that to be the thickness of all trading cards. If they don't have a ...


1

You could use full sheet magnetic labels. Print onto cardstock, adhere magnetic sheet to the back, cut out tiles.


1

Getting custom printing of arbitrary shapes on arbitrary materials is hard to do, even in this internet age of CafePress and print-on-demand book publishing. One thing that's easy, though, is making custom stickers: go and Google "sticker maker", and it will show you sticker-making machines. Those machines take any shape of cut-out paper, and make the back ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible