Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

26

Okay, I'll give it a shot. First, what they have in common: Static Cards: They are all static (meaning not CCG) card games. Some (Dominion and Thunderstone) have expansions, but none of them require collecting or hunting down 'rare' cards to make the game better. Victory Points: They all use a Victory Point system to determine the winner. This is called ...


25

Opening hand: Leyline of the Void Helm of Obedience 2 Dark Rituals 1 Swamp Turn 1: Start with Leyline of the Void on the battlefield. Play a Swamp, then a Dark Ritual. Use one black mana to play another Dark Ritual. You will now have BBBBB in your pool. Play the Helm of Obedience and activate it for 1 mana. Your opponent's entire deck will be milled out ...


24

It does seem, from your description of your play style, that you do have a problem in consistently misinterpreting what things help people win Magic games. Let's have a look at some of the things you say you like, and that you underestimate: LIKES Lifegain - with a few rare exceptions, lifegain cards are TERRIBLE - they do nothing to help you win the ...


18

There are two basic reasons to use a tutor: 1) You have a card that you want more than 4 of, but there is no similar substitute available. 2) To be able to have a 'toolbox' of 1-of answers to different types of threats. So what is the card in your deck that you wish you could have more than 4 of? What are possible substitutes for it in the format you're ...


18

Short answer Yes. You should take cards out to keep a 60 card deck size. Medium answer Yes. It's always legal to play more than 60 cards. But when you design a deck, you don't - you keep it to 60 as much as possible. When you sideboard, you're redesigning your deck on the fly - and the same reasons that you kept it to 60 cards in the first place still ...


16

Activating the Grindstone when you have a Painter's Servant in play will mill an opponent's entire library in a single shot. The scarecrow turns all cards that aren't in play a single shared color; the Grindstone mills two cards from your opponent — and if those cards share at least one color, it recurs.


16

I'm assuming you mean the "big three" Legendary Eldrazi -- Emrakul, the Aeons Torn, Ulamog, the Infinite Gyre, and Kozilek, Butcher of Truth. If you want any Eldrazi, like a Pathrazer of Ulamog, you can always use reanimation spells. These three, however, have the persnickety clause: When {card name} is put into a graveyard from anywhere, its owner ...


15

The text file found on the page you linked to with Commander info has a better description of the rules that clears this up. The important parts: A card can't be included in your deck if any mana symbol in its mana cost or rules text is a color not in your commander's color identity. A card also can't be included in your deck if it has a ...


13

On color Green: The obvious choice in your situation is Full Moon's Rise. It buffs all your werewolves while it's in play and you can sacrifice it to save all of them from a Ratchet Bomb. Another direction is Withstand Death, but this only provides the means to save creatures on an individual basis and is a sideboard card at best. Asceticism gives ...


12

To cite a famous example, this is actually how the Tolarian Academy decks of Urza-block standard and extended worked. Here's a sample decklist, played by Tommi Hovi to win PT Rome (the first major tournament at which this sort of deck was legal): 4 Ancient Tomb 3 City of Brass 4 Tolarian Academy 4 Tundra 4 Volcanic Island 3 Abeyance 3 Intuition 4 ...


11

Building an inexpensive blue deck means concentrating on one of the strategies it does well at common, which could mean "mill" (causing your opponent to draw out his or her deck), cheap flyers, card drawing, or creature denial (cards like Unsummon or Sleep). These strategies tend to dovetail nicely with merfolk. Merfolk themselves have a "strategy," as there ...


11

You should be able to build a reasonable deck of any colour for casual play using just standard commons. It won't be particularly exciting, but as long as you have a reasonably large fraction of creatures, go easy on the enchantments, and choose cards to follow the mana curve (i.e. some low cost, some high cost, most in-between), you'll be fine. I'm not ...


11

Conventional wisdom is to run around 40% lands in Limited. This means around 12-13 lands for a 30-card deck, and 17-18 lands for a 40-card deck. Respectively, decks will typically to run 12/17 lands if running a typical two-color, standard-curve deck and 13/18 lands (if running a three-color or color-heavy cards). Mana fixing is always very imporant - ...


11

Cards in hand are options. Having more cards in hand gives you more options. Having the right cards in hand gives you better options. Card filtering (of which scry cards are a subset) is good any time you want a specific card. Your intuition about combo decks is correct, but it doesn't stop there. Consider a control deck that uses a mixture of ...


11

As an unscientific method for quickly throwing lands into a draft deck, I could up the number of coloured mana symbols in the casting costs of my cards, and use the results as a ratio to choose my lands. So, if my deck has 20 white mana symbols and 10 blue mana symbols, and I need to select 17 lands, I'd typically be thinking about 11 Plains and 6 Islands. ...


11

Fetchlands + duals is a formula used by almost all the top decks in every format that allows them. The main advantage is monumental consistency. Verdant Catacombs, for instance, can fetch any of the following original dual lands: Badlands (Swamp / Mountain) Bayou (Swamp / Forest) Savannah (Forest / Plains) Scrubland (Plains / Swamp) Taiga (Mountain / ...


10

Creatures are what makes you win and what makes you lose games in Limited. Therefore I would consider the baseline types of spells for Limited not only creatures, but creatures + creature removals. Creatures with evasion are powerful in Limited, so sometimes the only solution to a sticky situation is a targeted removal. So, assuming a 23-17 distribution, ...


10

Usually, my draft decks tend to aim for 16-17, 6-7 other spells, and 17 lands. Generally, if you end up with 19-20+ creatures your deck is going to be aggressive but insufficiently versatile. If you end up with 11 or fewer creatures your deck may have lots of "answers" but a shortage of ways to actually win the game. As ever, striking a balance is key. ...


10

If you play a common deck or a deck with a common theme it's easier for your opponent make correct decisions. Say I've played against your "Goblin deck" a lot of times. I know what are your most dangerous threats, what creatures I want to kill, what spells I want to counter, how long I should wait before I play my sweeper, what your kill range is, and so ...


10

There are tons of options: Attrition or Blood Rites, while requiring to pay mana, would kill your opponents creatures (or the opponent himself in the case of the rites). If you need something that doesn't require mana to activate you could try Bloodthrone Vampire, Carrion Feeder or Devouring Swarm. Hell's Caretaker can be an interesting choice, because it ...


9

Have you ever seen any of the decks that were popular a few years ago circa Coldsnap, that centred around the Martyr of Sands/Proclamation of Rebirth engine? If you're going to gain a lot of life, then a combo that can realistically get you 10-20 life every turn is what you need to be looking at. A lot of decks - any deck that wants to win by beating down ...


9

In Commander, it's typical for decks of all colors to run "mana rocks" -- artifacts that generate mana. Some of the popular ones are: Sol Ring, Mind Stone, Thran Dynamo, Darksteel Ingot, Worn Powerstone, Dreamstone Hedron, Mana Vault, Mana Crypt. Some of these help with mana-fixing, others just produce colorless mana; the former is often helpful in a ...


9

The card has a lot of uses, similarly to fetch lands and cantrip spells. Generally: It lets you play less actual lands (like in 1-land Belcher Decks). It lets you find the right land (when you are using dual lands). It's a free way to shuffle your deck. It's a free way to increase storm count. It filters your deck making it slightly smaller. By using free ...


9

I assume you are talking about a Black/Red Vampire Standard deck with Curse of Stalked Prey as the card that generates the counters. Hex Parasite is probably a bad idea, as it will completely hog your mana supply. You have to pay mana to remove counters which he put on basically for free. You may be able to eat the counters, but the creatures will still ...


8

You could try playing more spot removal (such as Condemn or Path to Exile) instead of mass removal. Typically aggro-control decks have problems if you succesfully remove their first threats. This way the control deck won't die in the early turns and will be in a good position to win the game, because it has a better late game. The reason behind spot removal ...


8

General Strategies: It is a terrible matchup indeed. Your deck wins on the late game (except for possible reanimation auto-wins with Iona and Elesh) and the inevitability of Emrakul makes that impossible. Anything that invalidates one of the threats of the deck will just be wasting time until Emrakul comes down, so I would try to attack the core of the ...


8

Tynam's answer covers the general case very well: the minimal deck size is optimal, and there are very few good reasons to deviate from that. Nonetheless, here are some examples of corner cases where you may legitimately want to deviate from making one-for-one substitutions when you sideboard. Storm-style combo decks Unlike a more "traditional" two- or ...


8

Start by accepting that your deck won't be as straight-up competitive as it could be without Mox Opal — it's a staple, and cutting staples, especially for budget reasons, inevitably involves giving away some percentage points here or there. Maybe you can gain some improvements in unusual matchups, though. What does Mox Opal do for you? Consider what ...


7

I'm one of the guys working on DominionSim (although the googlecode version isn't up to date*) and we're trying to implement all the cards/rules, not just build for one test case. That said, we still have a ways to go implementing cards. The way DominionSim in particular works: it's written in C# to test a specific behavior you write a Strategy class ...


7

I admit I don't have much experience in actually doing this, so I have no idea how well any of these actually work and can't make any guarantees myself. But I'm sure there are others who can, and these are probably some great starting points: dominion simulator python framework similar project vdom java simulator A sourceforge project Dominionsim is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible