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11

Designer and sometimes attendee at design group BOGA DAP here. I'll share my personal experiences and preferences. As a tester, to feel good about the event: In general, I prefer the game to be taught as if you were teaching an already-published game. If you are getting a blind playtest, or testing the ability of players to learn from a rulebook, then I ...


11

I use custom SVG when designing playing cards. Inkscape uses SVG as its backend format. Coming from a web development background, I found SVG to be easier to learn than something like LaTeX. (It's just XML.) I have a single external CSS file and a Ruby script using the "builder" library to construct the SVGs from a database. If you don't want to use a ...


10

I'm an aging grog... For me, I judge a game based upon player-hours of play. At about $1 per player-hour. Same rate I've used since the late 80's... And at that rate, the $30 supplement I just got for TTR/TTRE has some way to go. 1st two plays were 4p @ 2.5h and 3p @ 3h - so far, $19 of the $30. One more large play should do it. Dominion and Intrigue got ...


9

A lot of this really applies to all games, not just single-player ones. The biggest reason for me is that computer games provide a limited interface - small screen, limited controls - and that can be painful to deal with. It's pretty much impossible, with current technology, for a computer game to provide a comfortable view of a table-sized board and ...


5

I've playtested games for a couple of friends (one at various early iterations, one in a near-finished state). What I'm looking for: Complete rules (even if they may go through more iterations). It's frustrating to have a rules question that is not answered by the booklet because it is intentionally incomplete. On the other hand, unintentional oversights ...


5

This is a very difficult question to answer, and its probably the reason that persistent, player power modifying changes are not included in most card games. one possible solution is a central online data store/mobile app This may be beyond your project, but one solution would be to implement some form of website wherein player profiles can be stored, this ...


5

Make it so that it doesn't matter if players have faked their profile. Say having a high ranked profile means that you have access to better equipment (and therefore an incentive to produce a fake profile). You could reduce the impact of this by (say) introducing a handicap for high ranked players when playing against lower ranked players. If there is a ...


3

I have been using GIMP to make all my cards. Since I make mostly print and play games, I have a single template I use with OpenOffice draw to allow the printing of 8 cards per page. After I have designed the card with GIMP, I save it as a JPEG, open the template in Draw, drag each JPEG file to it's place on the template, then save as a PDF.


3

Take a look at Magic Set Editor 2. It will let you define one or more templates for the structure of you cards. Each template can include a configurable background, classifications (such as manna color or team association) You can also define a number of editable text fields on the face of the card for title, descriptions and flavor text. Then, in ...


2

For me personally, dollar per hour calculations aren't useful. I usually peg costs to something else. Recently, I've been using Chipotle burritos. When I look at a $50 game, I determine whether I would rather have that, or 7 burritos over time. As far as being an expensive hobby, I'll quote someone from BoardGameGeek, on the MSRP of Antiquity being $125: "I ...


1

Illustrator is what I design all my cards in. Its pretty simple and easy and there are TONs of tutorials and books to learn from. It also plays well with all the other Adobe software if you need to do raster graphics or layout design, etc. Its also an industry standard in the graphic design community.


1

If you're doing basic prototyping for the game, consider using HTML/CSS. It's not as glamourous, but it can be a lot faster to move elements around to test things. You'll need something more 'shop-ish when you get to actual card elements design, but on the plus side you'll already have a template of what you want things to look like!


1

Seeing how most Video Games start at $60 for standard versions it puts it on par with the price of a designer board game. Same would be true for 2 people to go to the movies with popcorn+soda mixed in. DVDs are probably the only case where the cost to entry is lower than a board game. I tend to calculate the cost of a game vs the number of times I am ...


1

My copies of Splotter's Indonesia and Duck Dealer have long since paid for themselves, and paid for my copies of Roads & Boats and Antiquity (which haven't yet, but I anticipate they shall eventually). My general rule of thumb is that a game needs three to five fun plays in it before I really feel like it's been worth the money, even with the cheaper end ...



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