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44

Significantly. The thing about 2d6 is that you've got a range of numbers that have a certain probability of them showing up. When you're rolling 2d6, your available numbers are 2-12. You're dropping off the number 1. Also, you have an escelating scale of percentage probability. 2's and 12's will happen 2.77% of the time (each). 3's and 11's will happen ...


30

Opposite sides add up to 21 on a d20 for the same reason that opposite sides add up to 7 on a d6: if there's a manufacturing or design defect, and the die ends up slightly flatter than intended, then the average result of the die will not change. Consider a d6 that ends up a bit flat: two sides opposite each other will both have an increased chance of being ...


18

First thing is, that it would make the numbers more or less unimportant, since they all have the same probability now (that of 4 or 10 before). This means good building spots are nothing you have to fight for anymore. Settlements will be more spread out from the beginning, because a starting settlement with a 2 or 12 is no problem anymore. So there will be ...


15

Could it be one of Rory's Story Cubes ? After looking closely at those photos, I'm going to say definitively, why yes. Yes it could: In the top photo, the front right die has an [L] and a fire facing the camera. In the bottom photo, the die in the top right of the box art depicts a single die with a magnet, sheep, and footprint on three sides. SQB ...


11

I assume that we are speaking about a D20 that makes some attempt to roll fairly, such as the ones used in D&D. This is different from the aptly named "spindown" D20 which is numbered in a simple spiral. Why do opposing faces add up to 21? According to Everything2.com's article on D20, opposing sides add up to 21 so that the numbers most distant from ...


10

Whatever non-expert game you play (Monopoly, snakes and ladders, etc.), rolling a 6 is good, rolling a 1 is bad. So I'd say "You win if you roll a 4 or more" is the most intuitive way to speak to a non-gamer.


9

Could it be you have Dragon Dice? Looks like this particular photo includes D8 not D10.


8

The die belongs to the 2013 version of Taboo, which added the new "game-changer die". You can see it in the picture below along with the other components of the game: As a game variation, you can roll the die before each round and have a chance to play with an alternate rule T: Play with standard Taboo rules Roman Column: You must be perfectly still, ...


7

A comment from the publisher on their Kickstarter page answers your question perfectly: This is their answer, but I'm also seeing complaints about unevenly shaped dice. If this is the case for your game, you should try to get your dice replaced. If you can't get your dice replaced, make sure you don't put duplicates on opposing faces. You want dissimilar ...


7

I may be misinformed, however my understanding of the situation is that this is a result of trying to normalize the value of each region on the d20. The best comparison is between an MTG spindown (where the numbers count down from 20-1 in sequence spiraling around the d20) and a regular d20. A spindown has all the high values clustered at one end, and the ...


6

In my house, we only ever play with a d12. We combine it with a number of different house rules. I don't like sleeping on the couch, so my house doesn't use the robber. Instead on a 7, you simply grab any one card from the bank. You can use it for a robber if you want to though, for sure. But once we started with the d12, we never went back to 2d6. On a 1, ...


5

As previously mentioned, someone made cards to replace the dice. The following cards are in his deck: (Ignoring "city" he added to every card) 6x Road, Plains, Hills 3x Road, Plains, Mountain 3x Road, River 3x River, Forest 3x River, Swamp So it's safe to say the following represent the face of the dice: Road, Plains, Hills Road, Plains, Hills Road, ...


4

Yes. The latest copy of the rules is actually much clearer than the version that came in my set. Here's the quote, with the same emphasis as the rulebook, but parenthetical bits removed: When a die is secured on a Spell card, it remains there until any player chooses to use it to complete a task, removes it from the spell to roll it, or until ...


4

Yes. In your example, technically speaking, you are really performing another round of rolling - rolling zero dice - and then resolving the final task. The die you have secured in your spell is a usable part of your dice pool, thus allowing you to meet the requirements of the adventure task even though you didn't physically roll any dice. Remember that ...


4

As long as the die isn't poorly manufactured, the propablility to roll any given side is close (for a perfect die - identical) to 1/6. The actual placement of faces changes nothing.


4

I'm assuming you've read the Wikipedia article, and followed some of those links. If not, read it first. Yahtzee has been deeply studied by a few people. The best known current techniques involve brute force computations over the entire state space. The state space (the set of all possible games) can be structured to be small enough that every location ...


4

Hello and welcome to the world of modern board games. The mechanism you are talking about is a common mechanism for a number of board games. You are correct that Arkham Horror uses this exact mechanism. Other games use a similar mechanism: Summoner Wars - uses a 6 sided die for combat but here you typically hit on a 3+ Eclipse - uses a 6 sided die for ...


3

The more dice you use to generate a single random value, the closer each random value will be to a certain average. You can see this happening in Catan: rolling two dice results in a lot more sevens than twos. If you do this with 4 dice, almost everything will be centered around the 14th coordinate. If you don't mind some normalization, you could use 2d12 ...


3

With 2-3 sets, you could play Button Men, a Cheapass Game about capturing dice. Lots of entirely free characters available.


3

There are several methods. instead of tiles, cards. Less cost to produce.Benefit: cheapdrawback: usually not square. a pile of larger geomorphs with just the rooms, not the contents thereof; cards by room typeBenefit: sturdy board chunks, highly flexible modedrawback: rooms fall into well known patterns movable chunks of wall on a gridded boardBenefit: ...


3

The tradition of numbering a d6 with 1 opposite 6, etc. goes back to the Ancient Greeks, if not before. As far as I know, the original reasoning behind that numbering isn't really known. It is, however, a way to improve fairness for a slightly flattened die, as noted above. Other defects such as voids could cause a particular region of a die to ...


3

Another reason might be that originally 6-sided dice used little holes to mark the numbers. The material removed to create a 6 is more than that to create a 1. As such, the different sides of a die had different weights. To balance the weight across all three directions of the die, opposing numbers were chosen to balance out the different directions. The ...


2

Yes. Dice that are secured with a spell are regarded as focused, and can be used at any time (by any player, including you) to fulfill a task's requirement(s). You don't need to roll again.


2

I'd suggest you look into existing games of a similar nature and explore what they've done. You'll see what does and doesn't work, and how well it works. That should help you decide on a good mechanic for your game. HeroQuest Descent Dungeon!


2

Pick up a bag of Chessex Blank d4s. (It's product number CHX29301, ask your Favorite Local Game Store). Grab a Dremel or Power Sander and take off the points. Then sharpie (or carve) the numbers in by hand. That's going to be your cheap route, unless someone decides to kickstart a project like this. Certainly cheaper than buying 3d printed versions.


1

How about http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/34947/dice-the-evolution ? I've never tried it but you only need to print out 1 page of paper to give it a shot :)


1

I found a pattern that is consistent with all equilateral die. If n=number of sides of the dice and k=a number chosen on the die, then the number directly parallel to k = n-k+1; however this doesn't work for non-equilateral dice like the d10. I still don't know what the relation between k and the numbers adjacent to k is yet.


1

I wonder if these are the ten-siders in question (faces, battleaxes, wings)... This is a Dragon Dice expansion of some kind, though I couldn't tell you which monsters these particular dice represent...


1

If your game has a DM role, I'd consider looking at the sort of "predetermined map" with slowly revealed information, with games such as HeroQuest and Descent being examples. If your game has no DM and randomly generated maps, I'd look at a game such as Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft for some ideas (this one in particular is similar to your ...


1

We've used the d12 several times, and I enjoy the change of pace. When using the d12, we've always treated the one as equivalent to the seven. That seemed like the most obvious choice. The idea of picking up a development card is intriguing. We have the event card expansion that is intended to replace dice. It's goal is to keep the probability curve ...



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