Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Bridge players hate guessing. Allowing non-disclosure will basically turn the game into a pointless guessing game, with luck (and to some extent, the bidding system) becoming the predominant factor, rather than skill. This will surely drive away the good players, and all that will be left will be self proclaimed bidding theorists... Just because you cannot ...


9

I understand how duplicate bridge works, but I'm still missing one small conceptual part of the scoring, being the outcome when a deal is passed out. Is the score for that hand just assumed to be 0 for both sides Yes. Why would there be an exception? Passing out the hand is a perfectly valid way to play it. making it identical to a hand that ...


8

Here is a summary of the relevant rules that @Pieter Geerkens linked to. I am leaving out some of the more sophisticated points, for example, the fact that an artificial/conventional pass call is treated as a bid for the purposes of these rules. The guiding principle is not to punish the out-of-turn bidder, but to make it impossible for the offending team to ...


7

Even with the same experts playing North-South, there will be luck involved. For instance When you have a pure guess in a two way finesse for a Q or distribution etc. When you have a guess during bidding (sacrifice or not etc) System wins/losses. When you overbid/underbid/play incorrectly and hit a lucky lie of the cards. Same hand could be played ...


6

I have played extensively in clubs in the US and Switzerland, and occasionally in other countries. Bidding boxes are now in almost universal use. Alert rules vary by country, and are substantially different from what you are used to in the ACBL. Fortunately most are simpler than the ACBL's. The club directors I met in Switzerland spoke excellent English -- I ...


6

Imagine the opportunities for abuse. Without a disclosure rule, partners can make up any system they want and thereby communicate in illegal ways. There's really no difference to the other players between "qble and Monica's private bidding system that we won't disclose" and conducting the conversation in Swahili; either way it's obfuscating information ...


5

In tournaments, certainly, a passed hand is treated like any other; both pairs get a zero score. But in some (NB not all) of those clubs where the hands are dealt at the first table rather than set up by the TD, it is the convention to re-deal a hand that is passed out the first time, on the grounds that it's likely to be passed out every time, and so give ...


3

There was formerly a product called Doop (which as far as I can tell is no longer printed) that used a similar idea. They would provide hand records from old regional tournaments along with the scores produced for those hands. It would operate like so: Each player is given a deck of cards and the list of hands for their seat (so e.g. North gets a list of ...


3

Playing with random partners on BBO is pretty frustrating. You will find a lot of "advanced" players playing "SAYC" who: make minimal offshape takeout doubles make minimal (off or on)-shape takeout doubles, then freebid interpret your jumps in competitive auctions as strong "weak 2 bid" = "I have a six card suit and a bad hand" "penalty double" = "I am sad ...


2

In reality a passed out deal on the first round should not be reshuffled and redealt. The reason it is done is that people pay table-money to play in a tournament and want to play the requisite number of boards with card-play as well as bidding. Therefore people feel "ripped off" if a board gets passed out. In a duplicate pairs contest, a board that is ...


2

Simple answer- No system- its an open community. If high level players like JEC don't need to specify a system why would anyone else. Partial answer- Most English speaking bridge players are American so can assume they play some sort of Standard American- they assume you are psychic so you know what they play.


2

I would expand on Aryabhata's answer by noting a fundamental fallacy in the question: the assumption that correct play by a given system always results in the same action on a given hand. There are many reasons - psychological, strategic, and game-theoretic - why in many situations the correct play is not constant. One of the most common answers given by ...


1

If I was directing I would rule under Law 12-A-2 (Normal Play of the Board Impossible): Average-plus to your opponents, average-minus to you and you partner. I would further rule under Law 90-B-5 (Improperly Touching Another Player's Cards) a further 10% penalty to both pairs. It is your Partner's duty to obey the Rules of the game, which she flagrantly ...


1

Here are the relevant rules for the various scenarios under your questions: LAW 30 - PASS OUT OF ROTATION When a player has passed out of rotation and the call is canceled, the option in Law 29A not having been exercised, the following provisions apply (if the pass is artificial, see C below): A. Before Any Player Has Bid When a player has passed out of ...


1

Of course there is still an element of luck in Bridge for the reasons laid out. In pairs competitions there is the luck of the "field", i.e. what your opponents do against you when they arrive at your table. If they do all the right things, your prospects are limited. However they are still there. The skill is in making the most of your own prospects on a ...


1

If a hand is passed out, every team that passes it out gets a 0 raw score. These players will also get the same matchpoint score as other teams sitting in the same seats (East-West, or North-South) with a 0 score. There is the likelihood that SOME pair(s) will play out the deal. Then they will get a higher or lower matchpoint score than average, depending ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible