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13

I once, in a serious tournament, in the very last round won a game when I was down a whole queen (at one point in the game - by the time I won I had recovered the queen and much more). I had also before I eventually turned the position around to be clearly winning offered my opponent a draw, a draw which would have advanced him to a statewide individual ...


6

In general, king making is contentious. In my mind, it's best reserved for when it will allow ending a game "Now-ish" in order to either facilitate a different, more generally enjoyable game, or to allow players to leave. There are a few other conditions where I find it less than unacceptable. These basically boil down to "not letting A have a runaway ...


6

Didn't figure to have to dig my copy of Shark out of the garage for this site! Here are the end of game rules. The game is over as soon as a company's share price indicator reaches 15,000 on the value scale, or all of the building in a particular colour have been used, or all of the shares have been sold The bonus that is due in the ...


5

I don't know if they spend a lot of time doing point-value memorizing, but I would imagine that there is a reasonable amount of time spent studying and memorizing endgame tesuji. Counting is important to properly evaluate when the tesuji are profitable.


5

It really depends on the circumstances. Are you in a tournament? Who is your opponent? How much time do you have? What will you learn from it? I would usually keep fighting if I lost a minor piece just to learn something from fighting a losing position, unless I was in an intense tournament and needed some rest. If I was down a Queen, I probably ...


4

I agree - this has always bugged me about the Tsuro rules. What we've done is: Whenever a player is eliminated, if there are players who are short tiles, then starting with the player holding the dragon, go around clockwise and give each player who is short one more tile. I think that works best and spreads out the influx of new tiles on a player death. My ...


2

Generally speaking, questions of etiquette should be decided within your group before you begin playing. If the players are all serious competitive gamers, they will try to win no matter how slim the chances are. Another big issue is the question of position: Is it better to guarantee getting second place, or try for a slim chance to win that if it fails, ...


2

Never. The only reason you should help another player is if it increases your chances of victory during that game. Everything else is unfair against the others. If someone is clearly winning or you for any reason feel the game is just a waste of time to continue: Bring it up for discussion. If the others feel the same way you can often just agree to give ...


2

It probably depends on the opponent. A master that is down as little two pawns without compensation would probably resign against another master. He might continue fighting if there were "extenuating" circumstances such as bishops of opposite color or a "blocked" position that makes it hard to win. In amateur play, it gets trickier. Here, the presumption is ...


2

If you do not force capture then it's very possible, trivial even, to have a stalemate. Even without though: From wikipedia: English draughts (American 8×8 checkers) has been the arena for several notable advances in game artificial intelligence. In the 1950s, Arthur Samuel created one of the first board game-playing programs of any kind. More recently, ...


1

My impression is more that the emphasis is on reading (or counting) the endgame, rather than memorizing the endgame. Certainly in that process you see some positions so frequently that you basically memorize how they are going to fall out, but this isn't quite the same thing as deliberately setting out to memorize the position. This is especially the ...


1

Possibly the best book on endgames (for amateurs) was written by Tomoko Ogawa: http://www.gobooks.info/g15.html She doesn't exactly "memorize" endgame positions, but she gives a list a "typical" (and not so typical) positions, and teaches us how to COUNT them.



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