Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

Your friend was wrong. There is no rule preventing a pawn from being promoted outside the normal move restriction rules (e.g. you can't leave your king in check).


14

I once, in a serious tournament, in the very last round won a game when I was down a whole queen (at one point in the game - by the time I won I had recovered the queen and much more). I had also before I eventually turned the position around to be clearly winning offered my opponent a draw, a draw which would have advanced him to a statewide individual ...


8

The rules in my copy and on the official site are quite clear: Starting with the active player and moving clockwise, each player with fewer than three path tiles draws a tile, continuing around the board until all players have three path tiles or the draw pile is empty. When new tiles become available later in the game, the first player to ...


6

There's no such concept. The following are the win conditions for the red and blue teams from the rules: A team wins if a dwarf from that team creates the connection to the treasure and the way there isn't blocked by a door of the other color. A team wins if a dwarf from the other team creates the connection to the treasure, but the way there for his or ...


6

In general, king making is contentious. In my mind, it's best reserved for when it will allow ending a game "Now-ish" in order to either facilitate a different, more generally enjoyable game, or to allow players to leave. There are a few other conditions where I find it less than unacceptable. These basically boil down to "not letting A have a runaway ...


6

Didn't figure to have to dig my copy of Shark out of the garage for this site! Here are the end of game rules. The game is over as soon as a company's share price indicator reaches 15,000 on the value scale, or all of the building in a particular colour have been used, or all of the shares have been sold The bonus that is due in the ...


5

I don't know if they spend a lot of time doing point-value memorizing, but I would imagine that there is a reasonable amount of time spent studying and memorizing endgame tesuji. Counting is important to properly evaluate when the tesuji are profitable.


5

It really depends on the circumstances. Are you in a tournament? Who is your opponent? How much time do you have? What will you learn from it? I would usually keep fighting if I lost a minor piece just to learn something from fighting a losing position, unless I was in an intense tournament and needed some rest. If I was down a Queen, I probably ...


3

I agree - this has always bugged me about the Tsuro rules. What we've done is: Whenever a player is eliminated, if there are players who are short tiles, then starting with the player holding the dragon, go around clockwise and give each player who is short one more tile. I think that works best and spreads out the influx of new tiles on a player death. My ...


3

3 kings vs 1 king is usually not enough for force a win, because (as you discovered), you can't catch a king that can safely stay on the main diagonal. The rules say that 1 king vs 1 king (where neither king is immediately lost) is an immediate draw; 2 kings (or a king and a piece) vs 1 king is a draw if no captures occur within five moves, three kings (or ...


3

I usually resign when every move starts to feel hopeless. However, if you are late enough in the game you can sometimes carry on to attempt a stalemate.


2

You've misunderstood the scoring principle. White is, as you explained, diving the board. But that has no impact on scoring by itself. We often say, misleadingly, "divide the board in areas", but we should really say "stake out territory by surrounding it with walls". Only then can you count the score. It is a bit tricky at first, but once you grasp it, ...


2

The answer by @RemcoGerlich is essentially correct. Some extra info below. For further reference see the Dutch book Drie tegen een is gemeen, that contains a mathematical proof that 3 vs. 1 kings is a draw (which predates the age of perfect knowledge endgame databases by almost a decade!). The answer depends crucially on both the board geometry and the king ...


2

If I don't mistake professionals learn a lot of typical local value of moves it's a way to play faster and correctly endgames I suppose.


2

It probably depends on the opponent. A master that is down as little two pawns without compensation would probably resign against another master. He might continue fighting if there were "extenuating" circumstances such as bishops of opposite color or a "blocked" position that makes it hard to win. In amateur play, it gets trickier. Here, the presumption is ...


2

If you do not force capture then it's very possible, trivial even, to have a stalemate. Even without though: From wikipedia: English draughts (American 8×8 checkers) has been the arena for several notable advances in game artificial intelligence. In the 1950s, Arthur Samuel created one of the first board game-playing programs of any kind. More recently, ...


2

Generally speaking, questions of etiquette should be decided within your group before you begin playing. If the players are all serious competitive gamers, they will try to win no matter how slim the chances are. Another big issue is the question of position: Is it better to guarantee getting second place, or try for a slim chance to win that if it fails, ...


2

Never. The only reason you should help another player is if it increases your chances of victory during that game. Everything else is unfair against the others. If someone is clearly winning or you for any reason feel the game is just a waste of time to continue: Bring it up for discussion. If the others feel the same way you can often just agree to give ...


1

Some players will do anything to try to prevent them losing... From the position above, white promotes and black may as well resign. White can make a 2nd queen and give one of them up if necessary to prevent black's attack with the d and e pawns. You won't even need to do that though. If black moves Ke4 his pawn on d5 is pinned, if he plays d5-d4 you go ...


1

My impression is more that the emphasis is on reading (or counting) the endgame, rather than memorizing the endgame. Certainly in that process you see some positions so frequently that you basically memorize how they are going to fall out, but this isn't quite the same thing as deliberately setting out to memorize the position. This is especially the ...


1

Possibly the best book on endgames (for amateurs) was written by Tomoko Ogawa: http://www.gobooks.info/g15.html She doesn't exactly "memorize" endgame positions, but she gives a list a "typical" (and not so typical) positions, and teaches us how to COUNT them.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible