Hot answers tagged

27

Your friend was wrong. There is no rule preventing a pawn from being promoted outside the normal move restriction rules (e.g. you can't leave your king in check).


16

I know much more about Go than chess, so I don't know how accurate my guesses about chess endgames will be, but... I think chess tends to be at its simplest in the endgame (like Go), and there is little information in the endgame about how the rest of the game progressed (unlike Go). And, there are algorithms for winning (in some cases) that generalize to a ...


14

I once, in a serious tournament, in the very last round won a game when I was down a whole queen (at one point in the game - by the time I won I had recovered the queen and much more). I had also before I eventually turned the position around to be clearly winning offered my opponent a draw, a draw which would have advanced him to a statewide individual ...


13

The rules in my copy and on the official site are quite clear: Starting with the active player and moving clockwise, each player with fewer than three path tiles draws a tile, continuing around the board until all players have three path tiles or the draw pile is empty. When new tiles become available later in the game, the first player to ...


8

Yes. Though it's rare, some games mix up what it means to win and to lose, because why not? Games typically treat everyone as either 100% winner or 100% loser, but it doesn't have to be that way. In real life, there are many situations where you don't just win or lose, and a lot of people are satisfied if they're able to maintain their situation. Some games ...


7

As TimK pointed out, the situation could be but may not be a Seki but without a diagram to show to us, it's not easy for us to guess what happened. Seki : no one die, everyone live $$cm1 $$ +---------------------------------------+ $$ | X . O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | X . O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | X X O X . . . X . . . . . . . . ...


6

There's no such concept. The following are the win conditions for the red and blue teams from the rules: A team wins if a dwarf from that team creates the connection to the treasure and the way there isn't blocked by a door of the other color. A team wins if a dwarf from the other team creates the connection to the treasure, but the way there for his or ...


6

There are no whole-board endgame databases because there are too many possible permutations in the end. Such an approach could not be handled with state-of-the-art computer systems. The good news is that endgame databases for confined, local situations do make sense and can be applied really well, the further the endgame has progressed. After you have ...


6

In general, king making is contentious. In my mind, it's best reserved for when it will allow ending a game "Now-ish" in order to either facilitate a different, more generally enjoyable game, or to allow players to leave. There are a few other conditions where I find it less than unacceptable. These basically boil down to "not letting A have a runaway ...


5

I don't know if they spend a lot of time doing point-value memorizing, but I would imagine that there is a reasonable amount of time spent studying and memorizing endgame tesuji. Counting is important to properly evaluate when the tesuji are profitable.


5

It really depends on the circumstances. Are you in a tournament? Who is your opponent? How much time do you have? What will you learn from it? I would usually keep fighting if I lost a minor piece just to learn something from fighting a losing position, unless I was in an intense tournament and needed some rest. If I was down a Queen, I probably wouldn'...


5

Simple answer: There is no such thing as "non-fully walled territory". So far as the upper left is concerned, black has exactly two points: D10 and F10. All the rest is not territory, because it's not enclosed. Sure, it's all potential territory, but it only becomes actual territory when black takes that critical L11 point to actually enclose it. So if ...


5

This isn't really a finished game. If both players passed, then all of the points around E13 would count as dame just like the ones around H8, and wouldn't be territory for Black. This wouldn't happen in a serious game, so in a beginners' game, you would notice the problem during the scoring and probably just fix it.


4

To truly meet with your criteria, there would have to be a ruleset that determines winning conditions as well as a ruleset that determines losing conditions, and some situation that does not fit either of those rulesets. The best example I can think of that comes close to what you're looking for is Saboteur (+expansion). A round of Saboteur can end in a ...


4

I am a chess arbiter and I can confirm that this rule does not exist whatsoever in the FIDE rules of chess. The only restriction to promotion is if it's an illegal move.


4

The answer by @RemcoGerlich is essentially correct. Some extra info below. For further reference see the Dutch book Drie tegen een is gemeen, that contains a mathematical proof that 3 vs. 1 kings is a draw (which predates the age of perfect knowledge endgame databases by almost a decade!). The answer depends crucially on both the board geometry and the king ...


4

3 kings vs 1 king is usually not enough for force a win, because (as you discovered), you can't catch a king that can safely stay on the main diagonal. The rules say that 1 king vs 1 king (where neither king is immediately lost) is an immediate draw; 2 kings (or a king and a piece) vs 1 king is a draw if no captures occur within five moves, three kings (or ...


3

I usually resign when every move starts to feel hopeless. However, if you are late enough in the game you can sometimes carry on to attempt a stalemate.


3

I agree - this has always bugged me about the Tsuro rules. What we've done is: Whenever a player is eliminated, if there are players who are short tiles, then starting with the player holding the dragon, go around clockwise and give each player who is short one more tile. I think that works best and spreads out the influx of new tiles on a player death. My ...


3

President, a card game (also known by many other names). The game has many variants and it can be played continuously. Each round has one winner (the president) and one loser (the scum).


2

It probably depends on the opponent. A master that is down as little two pawns without compensation would probably resign against another master. He might continue fighting if there were "extenuating" circumstances such as bishops of opposite color or a "blocked" position that makes it hard to win. In amateur play, it gets trickier. Here, the presumption is ...


2

If you do not force capture then it's very possible, trivial even, to have a stalemate. Even without though: From wikipedia: English draughts (American 8×8 checkers) has been the arena for several notable advances in game artificial intelligence. In the 1950s, Arthur Samuel created one of the first board game-playing programs of any kind. More recently, ...


2

If I don't mistake professionals learn a lot of typical local value of moves it's a way to play faster and correctly endgames I suppose.


2

Generally speaking, questions of etiquette should be decided within your group before you begin playing. If the players are all serious competitive gamers, they will try to win no matter how slim the chances are. Another big issue is the question of position: Is it better to guarantee getting second place, or try for a slim chance to win that if it fails, ...


2

You've misunderstood the scoring principle. White is, as you explained, diving the board. But that has no impact on scoring by itself. We often say, misleadingly, "divide the board in areas", but we should really say "stake out territory by surrounding it with walls". Only then can you count the score. It is a bit tricky at first, but once you grasp it, it'...


2

Some players will do anything to try to prevent them losing... From the position above, white promotes and black may as well resign. White can make a 2nd queen and give one of them up if necessary to prevent black's attack with the d and e pawns. You won't even need to do that though. If black moves Ke4 his pawn on d5 is pinned, if he plays d5-d4 you go Qf3+...


2

Magic: the Gathering has 3 end states for a player: win, lose, and draw. With certain optional rules, a game can end with some players winning, some players losing, and some players drawing. In particular, the Limited Range of Influence Option has a clause that says If the effect of a spell or ability states that the game is a draw, the game is a draw ...


2

This situation is called Seki. Scoring depends on the ruleset you're using.


1

Winning and losing seems like a binary question. And at the core of this argument, you have to define what a win and a loss is. Usually, you're defining the win condition and not the lose condition (though, this isn't always the case, such as NetRunner, which has you lose the game if you take too much Grip damage or if you run out of a deck as the Corp). ...


1

Actually there is a game wich has that kind of ending. It is called Shadow Hunter. In the beginning people get a random card (hidden for the other players) with a character on it and a win condition associated. There are three factions : Shadows : They have to "kill" all the Hunters Hunters : They have to "kill" all the Shadows Neutral : Each one has a ...



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