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Similarly to InDesign, you can use Adobe Photoshop to generate a file for each different card. Set up the template the way you prefer, most important being the colour profile (ISO Coated v2 300% (ECI) is highly recommended if you're planning to print it professionally or even for services like Printerstudio) Give names to your layers Set up the Excel or ...


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I use Inkscape with the countersheet extension https://github.com/lifelike/countersheetsextension. The extension will take a csv file and use some basic pattern matching to allow images and text to be defined per card. Here's a getting started video http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xcf20p_intro-to-inkscape-boardgame-extensi_creation My only tip would be ...


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With a little setup work, Adobe InDesign can be a great tool for iterating on card designs. My process looks something like this: Setup an XLS or Numbers file with all the data for my cards. Different columns for different stats, text, card names, etc. By having it in a spreadsheet, you can do a lot of analysis on the stats, and it makes it easy to ...


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I am designing a game (already in public testing) in which everything is about the order of the cards in the deck. Of course, it isn't a MtG or YGO copy. It would not work in those systems for the reasons K.L. said. In my game, players start with a set number of 'characters' and a deck of 10 cards per character. Each card card represent actions that a ...


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I personally use a XML/XSLT/CSS approach: All my cards are simple xml files with the stat and text Then i transform them to a html file with the card structure using an XSLT style-sheet Then i add all the visual design with css The result is then converted to a png file I use a python scrip to for this, the lxml library converts the xml to the html and ...


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While it sounds game-specific, Magic Set Editor is a good tool for this. http://magicseteditor.sourceforge.net/ If you don't like any of the magic card frames (or Yugi-Oh or the couple of others it has) you can create your own - it just takes a little digging around to find out how to do so. I often just use one of the magic card frames, though. It has a ...


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The Dominion comparison is very apt. Most TCGs have minimum deck sizes but no maximums for this very reason. The power of the average card you have access to is the limiting factor. In most games of Dominion buying copper dilutes your deck, even though it is money. Combining a point buy with a minimum deck size would "solve" that problem, but unless you ...



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