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3

One way to remove a first-player advantage (in general for any open-information game) is to let one player make a proposed first move. Then the other player can choose to play as either side. This is similar to splitting a cake by letting one person cut and one person choose. The first player cannot take too obviously powerful a first move, or the second ...


3

This sounds like a great game for younger kids - but it must play so fast that I wouldn't even worry about handicapping for first player. Simply play First and First sets of two games, each player going first once, and play for total tricks. In practice any advantage less than half a trick will require playing several games anyways, in order for the ...


4

That is touched upon in the official History of Scrabble by Hasbro, the owner of Scrabble. Legend has it Butts studied the front page of “The New York Times” to make his calculations for the letter distribution in the game. This skilled, cryptographic analysis of our language formed the basis of the original tile distribution, which has remained constant ...


3

The scrabble tile frequencies were almost certainly tweaked based on playtesting as well as letter frequency. The fact that there are only 4 's' tiles was probably intended to decrease the probability of getting the most useful letter to make the game less about simply pluralizing things. Words with Friends tweaked the frequencies further- they added an ...


7

This question would probably receive a better answer on Woodworking SE. According to Wikipedia, as well as Canadian Woodworking, this is called a Dovetail key, Dutchman joint, or Butterfly joint. Another common name for it is a Bowtie joint/key. Below is the picture shown on Wikipedia: Dovetail keys are used to hold together two boards or one board that ...


7

For wooden train tracks, this is sometimes called a double-male connector. I've also seen it used without the double prefix. I got the image from this page.


1

I think the mechanic you came up with doesn't work well for 1 dice per player. Basically you're taking the luck of the dice roll, and adding another luck factor. You can cancel this out by allowing the use of more dice. What if the gems you collect can be used to purchase more dice? You should take a look at the way resource collection is managed in Stone ...


6

Your game is a CCG. What you do with the cards - the actual mechanics of the game - is irrelevant here. A game's "type" is metadata. It's defined, roughly speaking, by the central piece of "equipment" needed to play it: a board, a table, minis, role playing, dice, an AV system, or, in your case, cards. Subtype, if any, usually describes the central ...


2

Just my opinion, and not meant to be perfect, so take it for what you will... table top I think of this as a game playable around a table. The table is typically 'kitchen table' or 'dining room table' sized. Players are typically, though not always seated during play. Any moving about the table is incidental to the game. For example, there's a table top ...


2

It looks like "wheel" and "dial" (or "game dial") are other names for this. I found a couple BGG threads with some suggestions: How do you make a game dial? Plastic grommets for cardboard wheels (ala BSG) The main things you could search for are: (paper) binding screws/screw posts/chicago screws (there's a site called Chicago Screws that sells them, but ...


1

Depending on how sturdy these need to be you could try attaching the pieces together with a brass brad. Granted it will not work for terribly long before it gets worn out, but if it's just for prototyping it should be sufficient.


1

This may be too niche of an "answer" but I occasionally go to a Beer & Board Games event at a local pub where people in the group bring their games and it's like there's a mini board game library running for the night. Anyhow, sometimes someone shows up with a "prototype" game and advertises that he's developing his board game and would like to play ...


0

This answer is going to repeat the answer to the question you cited, but add emphasis on one point: Running simulations is the key. You do what Adam's answer said: trying out random combinations and just reducing the results to some numbers you can compare. The relevance to your question is this: these simulations are, by definition, general. The method ...



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