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12

In Solving Quantum Tic-Tac-Toe, Ishizeki and Matsuura use a computer to search the game space to find solutions, but don't specifically speak to strategy. However, there are a few strategies we can glean from their results: Go for a half-point victory, not a full point victory. In their search they found the first player, X, cannot guarantee a win by being ...


12

Note: This answer below is using 1st Edition scoring rules (Cities only scored once). Although parts of the analysis are valuable to calculating the highest score possible (36 Scoring opportunities, try to score with Meeples that have a high point value per the 36 turns, the highest score of 278 is not correct. I will have to do further analysis to determine ...


9

As Hackworth notes, testing all possible layouts is obviously infeasible. However, it might be possible to get a decent upper bound on the points. I think we can safely assume that meeples will not be a scarce resource when playing in this way (since we can choose to complete the map in any order, it should not be difficult to ensure we always have meeples ...


8

Is there an optimal way of placing the tiles in order to maximize one player's score? Yes With a finite amount of tiles, a finite number of legal placements for any tile at any point in the game, and a finite amount of meeple plays after placing a tile, it should be obvious that there are a finite number of possible games. Every game has a definite ...


6

I suspect that you're right that in principle and possibly even in practice an optimal AI could be built for this game to determine who can win from the starting position, though it would likely take more computing power than you're likely to have readily available. The best approach for brute-force solving a game like this is something close to what ...


4

The maximum theoretical score is 338. I previously answered the question for 1st Edition rules (cities only scored once by farmers), so here is my second stab at this question. First, it should be rather clear to everyone that since there are only 72 tiles and one is the starting tile, that the maximum number of scoring opportunities is 36 if you go first. ...


2

The winning strategy for such a small Hex board is shown in this basic strategy guide. Like tic-tac-toe, on a 4x4 board white will always win by opening on the main diagonal, because for every counter that black can make, there is another way for white to force the win. Once white can form a "two-bridge" by placing the second piece in a non-adjacent space ...


1

My co-worker found what I believe is a winning strategy for the first player, but now I find earlier evidence by others as well. This is for the original version of the game, where you can send your opponent to an already won field and he has to place his mark there. It seems that the question is still open for the updated version where he can then choose ...


1

Sort of. A computer could brute force the optimal move each round based upon the decisions made by the opponent. You could even construct a matrix(huge) of all possible moves for a game. But there is no single path of one players choices that would guarantee a win. Your opponent can make choices that counter your choices effectively and give them the ...



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