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0

Although not strictly a new topology, I often play where the regular bound board is present, but on top of that draw n lines diagonally through points, connecting them. Through having a bottom left to top right, and a top left to bottom right diagonal go through the centre point. Through having 3 to 5 of these pairs of lines, they significantly change the ...


2

You've misunderstood the scoring principle. White is, as you explained, diving the board. But that has no impact on scoring by itself. We often say, misleadingly, "divide the board in areas", but we should really say "stake out territory by surrounding it with walls". Only then can you count the score. It is a bit tricky at first, but once you grasp it, ...


1

I have never seen Black 5 in any joseki book, but I'm sure I've seen it in my games. Probably a typical amateur mistake :) However, I have no idea why it would be bad - it looks like a reasonable move to me, given the right circumstances. I will first comment on the sequence you gave, then I will show which alternatives I would consider, and finally I'll ...


0

In your shoes, I'd play e16 (atari), Black pulls out to d17, White, e17, threatening to capture two stones, Black c17, you f15 to "capture" the Black stone on f16. But that assumes that the top is the most important part of the board. If, in fact, the left side is more important, the way you outline is better.


1

You need something like three kos to do this. But let's say that there are two players, X and Y. Player X takes the first ko. Player Y takes a second ko as a "ko threat." Player X takes a third ko in response. Player Y re-takes the first ko. Etc. The ko rule serves to prevent repetition between one or two kos. But if there are enough kos so that you can ...


5

Ko only prevents a player from making a move that would have the effect of returning the board to the position that it was in just before his opponent's last move only. So the only thing you ever need to keep track of is what the board was like just before your opponent made his last move; you cannot move such that it would recreate that position. All the ...


0

There are several rating systems, for most players their KGS rating and EGF rating will be different, and it can be different from national rating systems (e.g. it is often assumed that French and British ratings for the same player are 2 stones different). So, in a sense, your question cannot be answered unless you specify the rating system you want to be ...


0

the high approach is not for territory, but always a special approach due to a particular scenario of the whole board. One purpose of high approach is to attack. Refer to http://eidogo.com/#2LRby3iCq , the 3rd game of the Kamakura jubango between Go Seigen and Minoru Kitani. White 12 is the high approach. The idea is to cut the black 1 (4-4) from black 11. ...



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